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Ronulus Roman 

<sN s o, v 


80th Year No. 27 


A Panax Publication 


405 Main St.. Be' <V, " 

Z W 


Wednesday, July 5, 1972 


Phone WH M275 


2 Sections 26 Pages 


15 Cents 


No new i a. needed 
in city’s ’73 budget 


Ity IIENRY CANTIN budget after June 27 a public latively approved by the city is $12.50 mills ($12.50) per and service budget of 

A 1972-73 general operating citizens’ objSs pr7sent^ ™We have received the wJSlIlSn "SSfLSX? f 2 ® 37 - 000 as against 3.141.286 — ~ ~ 

fund budget of 56 451 546 has ii iho hnnrino , reteivea me valuation, stale equalized, last year when Romu us 

beon approved' hr In theTbsence of Mayor rccommendal.ons." This includes 5 50 mills for assumed maintenance and 

Romulus City Council. The Hvle J Carmichael dueto d city operation, three mills for road repair previously per- 

city s fiscal year began unavoidable pe^a^ „,e el, Vs current ,evy 

••n“.i s »b„d 8 „ .h«h* re j»a < sissrs siarsrswsss A»"iajsT«« , un r K'r ■.***■ 

not call for any increase in the il wanted to hear the views nrnnertv valuation !it1» pcnditure includes $2,687,071 department heads will receive 

city's current property tax and recommendation so the equalized ‘ ' $2 310 095 ^as? year- °a local an am '“ al sala !'y boost of $500 

annua? "wage and" salfrv in' ma i nr ""* hc P r "P'**d budge. The budge, represents an and major street budget o{ constellSg Vthrw 

creak's for^departnfenf^ea'ds R^Try ^"‘ll^The SlxVndiU^s of W , n n? US*?” ***?*' $3 $'-’? ™d 'he deputy city clerk, will " 

a-jd non union employes matter for the public hearing in the 1971-72 fiscal year. budget.' ‘$2«>4,97S compared 1 to fr^Mrs^'^^^^mch 8 ^! 

The council approved the was a proposed budget ten- The total property tax levy $299.700 last year, and a water subject to U-ITpay Bowd 

approval . These employes 
1 9 mo f,avc received 5 5 p° r cenl pay 

i (irdClC !.'mn?ow. l !° Wed un,on ‘ covered THHKK WHO CARE— Three mothers. Wick Hoads, raised *62. Tlie three among 

P - members of the Women’s Auxiliary of Ihe •ulu-rs who care for the Little Leaguers are 

\ 1 1 v cnntra „, K'«»«lus Youth Baseball Association, helped I from left l Mrs. Virginia Brilz. Mrs. Jan 

arew coveting 40to35citv emDloves ’ a,sr f, "" K f '” ,he "hit"" and Mrs. Marie Wedvkex. 

was 1 approved byVh’c council in Tl " *> ’ '"‘ ,d ,as ' K,lda > at -Romulus Roman photos 

# April y Int council m M ;il ,j ll s .M al a t| u> „ siation al Wayne and 

1] Tilt ft Mayor Carmichael, is his ' 

""" v kj report to Ihe council, said. 

The annual spring parade . “ l WOu,d ,ike 10 commend 
sp^msored and supervised by ^' rs * dll ‘ cd y council for its 
the Romulus Javcees on June vcr y timely budget 
25 attracted 2o’ units and a deliberations this year, 
large crowd Secondly, I would like to point 

The parade began at ° ul ,hat 1 fwl as does the city 
Kennedy Park in Romulus, council lhat 5.5 mills are 
proceeded east along Goddard adequate lo meet the needs of 
Road to Wayne Road tljen 

nordi of Wayne Road to the The ma > or d,d not attend 

carnival site, which was part an> ' nl T bud ^ e! ses sions 

of the annual spring festival condutled by members of the 
and parade council. The council, in ESFmMSK:'. 

schc-duling its budget sessions. 

In the parade were units of ^ . nnl * nv ' te t^ayor to 
the Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts P^jtcipate 
and Brownies. The Romulus ™ e ma >° r . his report to 
Baseball Association included ,h(> , c ° linc,, ‘ made recom- 
several of its teams. mendatjons and suggestions. 

• • O; her highlights of the ^' d * n P arl: 

. pu.adewe.e the Ginger Brca.l .,« w , , he a(1 . 

jR ' ' siTu » Gnbile of fin Aute .’ 1 : R ’”’ ‘ r 6 1 1 ' n > 

,W. SJt 13 j ?’■ •* , i-iwc-. is somewhat »f a 

, - : « [ rearrangement of th, funds^v 

v \iZ ? . ■ . ^ P? r . ad ® by the Waltz present >V allocated by the citv ’ 

t Cenienmal Parade Com- council}' We intend to show 

rn ee that there is a definite need inf 

LIBRARY SERVES BIRTHDAY CAKE - teatu.es of the eeiebration. Partaking of the ter ^ . J'\?o«2p. 8 Klta?*.! 2 * a ss'lChm u^s M^SWvia Dubuly withal 

ce,cbra ? ed ,t8 f, " t llbran’s birthday cake are (from left) Fred House ** The parade officials h Th ( ere ** a f need ,n s ® veral II'»“ulus Youth Baseball Association who assists I arrv Ilonpe (See slot v on’ page 3) 

" t, " > ’’*■ - 1 — R-mu.u. unman ph.io ?.rfsr";r. •* rr~ 

City workers limited ~ w ~~ ~~ ~ SSSS * (olMulu8 clt Y council 
to 5.5 per cent hikes Romulus csT^JrS delers U * R ‘ bud S et 

, citizens and its own employes. Formal approval oi a inform Mayor Hvle J Car- The budget is ud abou 

d . StUflPIlt there is a need to provide an proposed 1972-73 operating michael of this fact S 2 n non from the m-ovim.c i<> 

co^rTn hf CUy • empl °i yee * S l , ate - County and Municipal The city council and union ‘ iddi | ional department to budget for Romulus' Urban Mavm- (at michael was n-f>nth permd dueUi increase' 

annrm-lt h n C i 0nt «. C v ' arker 1 f- called for pay and agreed to have the federal • f j handle the personnel function Renewal Department has absent from the council in wage P and salary hikes giver 

Pen nRifnr^i °2 ? alar - v hikes * 13 per cent the board determine what, if any. OfC/CCrf " f ' he C W been deferred session due To "^avoidable cilyemployw under tKtv 

m 55 e^ni 1 nr a ih e ,m i lted >' ear and si * per cent in higher Increase could be •» U The budget eliminated all Council President Jimmie personal commitments ' union corn fact X 

inH wa» f tl e lhe second and third year. The allowed. Cynthia Washington a KEA employes hired by the Raspberry, al the council’s The urban renewal George Wil’helmi urban 

?he d ItotS ‘cSS? “the \ov ea ,f S are retroactive ,0 % . sophomore at Romius High '!! y an !’l m T r 'X prop ” se . d f'f mee " ng H ,? department’s proposed budget renewaf director, said thaf he 

Internal Revenue Sen-iee ha« rtf m V cijininunication from the School will be going to the h J} H , . \ cl J! s ba he proposed budget had calls for estimated total ex- bad submitted a budget to all 

announced 6nUe ^ Of the mereases approved.- IRS to City Attorney Peter E. National Future Homemakers S dep fr a " d not been received by the c ty pr-ndauros of $123,405 from members of the council. He 

5.5 P er cent became im- 0 Rnurke, who represented of America Convention in Los ^'abllshment of a personnel council He instructed City April l to June, 1973 - a 15- said the budget was ten- 

Tl... . . . m .® dia,e| y .effective in line the city during the period of Angeles. , epar,, ?}! nl were also Clerk Leonard J Folmar t0 month period. latively approved before 

Jal Si'Cto Cu h s eg p U i del r S r tf0r,hby c0 . n ' rac ,' ne r ,iaUo f ns ; sta f ted: Cynthia has been chosen ^mma.ed council’s ok^ nf a contract 

Teamaters. the U.S. Pay Board. On the basis of the facts from a number of girls and Tlu- council approved by the TT • 1 • T with Local 214 of the Team- 

hat you have presented, we boys in Michigan to represent budget by a 5 to l vote. nll*PaKln HI*nOTflin s,crs ' s,a,e - c 0 “ n, y and 

Tf — find no justification for their state. Councilman William M -B--B.-*--"- ^ JVJ.U. IJJ. Cllll municipal workers. 

HnYlff/) granting an exception under She has participated with Oakley voted against the 

Section 201 U of the Economic theFHAof her school, advised budget, while Councilman • 1 lie also reported that hehad 

Stabilization Guidelines by Mrs. Lovette, home Ellis T. Pennington was ab- U.00C1S lTlOrC lOlTS submitted in April to council 

fm Consequently, your ap* economics teacher. sent. ^ ^ members and the mayor a 

/|/V>FI f £ ,cali ,° n I s denied ' and tbe At the conference, students „„ fll . „ , , „ . _ tw revised budget, which in- 

^ #|/ ^ fj Romulus Teamsters Local 214 from all over the country will m M . Help! Help! HeipJ says Earl Lamb, chairman for the eluded wage and salary hikes 

. t w are Smiled to a 5.5 per cent learn of FHA events and how Meeting Jo , b Placement and Hire-A-Kid programs. given to city employes. 

The inability to locate house time and expense, the city pay increase. to make their FHA clubs ® . Wehaveloadsof qualified applicants for all kinds of work . , f .. . . . . 

numbers immediately in some council was told y “However, if you do not better. nhnTkcmfl but we re short of jobs,'* said Lamb. Approval of the budget by 

areas of the City of Romulus agree with the findings, and During her visit, she will go Lamb issued a plea to employers Monday for any kind of it 10 \ S Housing and Urban 

by law enforcement personnel Councilman Fred Junior wish to appeal, you must reply to Hollywood studios A regular meeting of the )° bs for Romulus residents who have filed for work through Development (HUD; awaits 
is causing lost “valuable” Block reported to city council within 10 days and submit any Disneyland and other in' Romulus City Council will be center. final approval by the city 

last week the problems that additional information you teresting places held at 8 pm tonight (Wed- -Wp Q A , urn c °iH lcl ‘ Wl,he,n Ji said. 

Class SSSJSKSaJ.'sa buS, 'i S V5£S"K 

ijiass b... ^L.s.b.d.ua,,., m,. .. T . h d.™."d c, ™S e a».1 If", u , rb *' 

openings '»EZZ °— . 

• be done lo compel city l>n council not receiving the 

remain residents to have their house -m~ *W A / -k * - _ budget was apparently 

Wfl * numbers placed in con- m M M * M_ ■ /■ • * m — • 9 W • ~W referring lo the fact that the 

Openings remain available spicuous locations to make it ■ # W /I /| "W Q "W~ Vt'V ~M ~W% fk ~W~~B proposed revised budget had 

in the cultural and social easier for police and other city X A M 1/1 WM, m,WM M m M M M M M M M not t H >en formally presented to 

summer program,. sponsored agencies to locale house ad- w w the council by the mayor, it 

by Ihe Romulus Community dresses. W was staled 

Workers, at the Neighborhood »> PAM WATT \" area newspa|ier had department had directed lo a ’first progress report" in staling il had not been his 

Action Center. Councilman James C. PCHA hoard members last charged that a memo from the attorney general nine the beginning of an inqutrv place lo release it in board J 

The openings are in classes ™ a ar P°'ntod out that night expressed dismay that a 'M'hur G Rochon, examiner months ago into the PCHA which Ecorse members llKlcX 

for crocheting, modern dance a J c rec l ulre d to see letter from the state auditor’s ,n ' h ‘‘ ,r > e ‘? sur >' department. According lo Smith, there city officials and then PCHA Smith explained Ihe memo ... ... . . 

and music. , a ^ ei j’ house numbers are office to the state attorney ° A,, y- Gen FYank J was "not a single charge of officials had requested to members last night Classified ads B4-B11 

J-Xr^rTo^ ^" ,heycanbeseen »ed ,a f h eW r jd ,,X^A\VT^ n 

hLi r .MZI c President Jimmie 'tu^'u^ were the fttfW 5 ^ 

raW ' nRan SVSIS | ^&y C Xr,S.SnS! "'Z^gldT Ward Smith o &S5 ^ d had been s.ratghtened ^ 

Classes will be held Monday urging residents to make sure 1 counsel - about the manner in Ipl» il rimn^l fnr iho hncr*;i*i procedures. Huuils who helped the at Obituaries B9 

har:r^o,dT« 

P m. d, storied facts. ,,ues.,ons the treasury memo, because il was termed letter as confidential. (Continued on Page A-3) W^men snews ZZZULm 





Page A* 2 


A PANAX PUBLICATION 


Wednesday, July 5, 1972 


Van Buren sets 
zoning meeting 


The Van Buren Township 
Board of Zoning Appeals will 
hold a special meeting at 8 
p.m Julv 10 in the township 
board room, 4G425 Tvler Rd 
The following items will be 
up for decision of the board of 
zoning appeals 

Rmve Sign Co., 1400 Kene 
St.. Detroit, permission to 
erect a sign in the township; 
Highland Construction Co., 
18620 W 10 mile Rd., South- 
field. request for approval for 


construction trailer site 
during a construction project 
in the township 
Stanley Geldys, 9055 Morton 
Taylor Rd , Belleville, per- 
mission to store equipment 
incidental to demolition 
business in a residential area 
of the township; and Shelter 
Systems, Inc., 21840 W. Nine 
Mile Rd . Southfield, request 
for special approval for a 
temporary construction 
trailer on the site of a con- 
struction project. 


0 lMi 

WHY 

■Mt ft 

vv III 

NOT BUY FRESH 

QUALITY PRODUCE? 



FARMER GEORGE'S MARKET 

16280 MARTINSVILLE RD., bellevilie 

BETWEEN SAVAGE & BEMIS 

OPEN 9 A.M.-8 P.M. 697-0872 



Mrs. Chaney 
cites busing 
in House bid 


CYCLE SAFETY DISCUSSION — Van Buren Township’s 
summer recreation program sponsored a cycle safety 
program at the Belleville Senior High School last Thursday. 
Both AAA and Michigan State Police representatives were 
there. Among students hearing some safe driving tips are 
(from left, on cycles) Chip Ailstead. Cal Walls. Mickey 


Warren and William Loyd, director of the summer recreation 
program. Standing is Steve White (center) of the AAA and 
State Police Officer Roger Kirkpatrick (right). The boys in 
the background also are students in the class. 

—Enterprise — Roman photo 


IPublic Meetings 1 


The following Is ’he schedule 
of *ar . ojs government and 

-,ch; cl ooarps duOUc meetings in 
bom *ne Belleville Enterprise 
ano Romulus Reman circulation 
area 

VAN BUREN 

TOWNSHIP BOARD Second 
and fourth Tuesday of every 
rr'.nfh in the Township Hall at 8 
p m 

PLANNING COMMISSION 
The first Wednesday of every 
rr or *n »f the Township Hall ai 
8 00pm 

BOAPD OF APPEALS The 
second Monday of every month 
m the Township Hall a> I pm 

Tr< /an Buren Sewer and 
Wate r Commission The first 
Monday of every month at tne 
township hall at I p rr. 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 
The second Monday of every 
month .n the Administration 
Bu Iding alt pm 

ROMULUS 

CiTV COUNCIL FIRST 
Tuesday and second Thursday 
ana Fourth Tuesday of each 
mon'n at the Municipal 
Bu.ia ro, mil S Wayne Rd.. al 

8pm 

. t.asniNG COMMISSION 
T: e Third Monday of every 
■ ontf, «t me Municipal 
Btiilp.ng. S W-^yne Rd . at 
• pm 

v r * a E •• T I ON 
COMMISSION Tre second 
*v;*soay o* every month m the 
City Hall at 8 p.m 

ROMULUS COMMUNITY 
RELATIONS COMMISSION 
Tne Fourth Monday of each 
month at 7 p m at the Municipal 
Bonding tint $ Wayne Rd 

BOARD OF APPEALS The 
second Wednesday of every 
rrcrfh in the new Ctly Hall a? 

7 30 pm 


PUBLIC HOUSING 
COMMISSION The third 
Wednesday of every month af 
the Housing Commission 
Bu'ld>ng 5907 Chamberlain St . 
at 6 30 p m 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 
The second and fourth Monday 
of every month at the Board of 
Education office. 34520 Grant 
Rd at 7 30 p.m 

HURON 

TOWNSHIP BOARD The 
second and fourth Wednesday of 
every month in the Township 
Hall at 8 p m 

PLANNING COMMISSION 
The last Monday of every month 
In the Township Hall at 7 30 p m 

BOARD OF APPEALS The 
first Monday ol every month In 
the Township Hall at 8 p m 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 
The third Monday of every 
month at the Hannan Road 
School al 8 p m 

SUMPTER 

TOWNSHIP BOARO The 
first and third Tuesday of every 
month in the Township Hall at 8 
pm 

PLANNING COMMISSION 
The first Tuesday ol every 
month n the Township Hall al 
7 00 P M 


HOUSING 
The first 
ry month at h>e 
at 8 p.m. 

EVILLE 
CITY COUNCIL Thefirstano 
third Mondavi of every month In 
the Municipal Building at 8 p m 

PLANNING COMMISSION 
The second Tuesday of every 
month m the Municipal Building 
ai 8 pm 





Cycle 
turnout 
is small 


Van Buren Township Police 
Chief John Willet Sr. was 
“disappointed” at the turnout 
at a cycle safety program 
conducted at the Belleville 
Senior High School last 
Thursday evening. 

Approximately 40 young 
persons attended. 

The program, entitled 
“Cycling Safety and Laws,” 
included a 45-minute film 
produced by Honda of 
America and talks by Steve 
While of the AAA and 
Michigan State Police Officer 
Roger Kirkpatrick. 

The cycle safety program 
was sponsored by the Van 
Buren Township recreation 
department being conducted 
under the direction of William 
L/>yd. 

Willet stated that, with the 
large number of motdrcycle 
and mini-bike owners in the 
township, lie expected a larger 
attendance at the cycle safety 
program sessions. 

i 

lie said that those who did 
not attend missed a “good" 
safety film on cycle operation 
and driving and “excellent 
talks” by members of the AAA 
and Michigan State Police. 




NOTICE 

LAST DAY TO REGISTER FOR 
PRIMARY ELECTION 


TO BE HELD ON 


TUESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1972. 


To the qualified electors of the City of Belleville, State of Michigan : 


£ NOTICE is hereby given that in conformity with the ‘‘Michigan Election Law” I, the 
£ undersigned Deputy City Clerk will upon any day except a legal holiday, the day of any 
x regular or special election or primary election receive for registration, the name of any 
& legal voter in said City not already registered, who may apply to me personally or 
| (authorized substitute) for such registration providing however, that I can receive no 
:£ names for registration during the time intervening between the fifth Friday prior to any 
:£ regular, special or official primary election and the day of such election. 

£• Notice is hereby given that I will be at the City of Belleville City Hall, 6 Main St. Belleville, 


on 


Friday July 7, 1972 


as provided for inspection 168 498 of the Michigan State Election L. ws 
from 8 am to 8 p.m. 

For the purpose of reviewing the REGISTRATION AND REGISTERING SUCH of the 
qualified electors in said City as shall properly apply therefore. 

JEAN BAUMDRAHER, 
DEPUTY CITY CLERK 


Nelson adds duties 
for Sybron company 


Sybron Corporation of New 
York, parent company of Kerr 
Manufacturing Co of 28200 
Wick Rd.. Romulus, has an- 
nounced the appointment of 
four group executives in its 
Health Products Group 

The new group executives 
and their respective areas of 
responsibility are Roy J. 
Conway, group executive- 
health services; William D. 
McGrath, group executive- 
hospital services; Russell E 
Nelson, group executive- 
dental sundries, and Joseph 
Stemler. group executive- 
professional equipment. 

In announcing the ap- 
pointments. Robert M. Kerr, 
Jr., groups vice president- 
health products, said., “The 
new' organization recognizes 
the unique characteristics of 
our four primary health 
businesses and — by linking 
similar operations together — 
slAjld enhance worldwide 
pBduct development and 
m*keting activities.” 

All divisions in the Health 
Products Group will condnue 
to operate as profit centers 
with their current presidents 
and functional managers. 
Division presidents will report 
to their respective group 
executives who in turn will 
report to the group vice 
president -health products 

The divisions in the health 
services section include 
Heritage Dental Laboratories, 
Inc., with headquarters in 
Seattle. Washington, and 
limited Dental Supply Cor- 
poration. a Canadian com- 
pany with headquarters in 
Toronto. Heritage 
headquarters are being 
moved to Romulus, effective 
Sept. 1. 

Operations in the hospital 
equipment section include 
Castle; Liebel-Flarsheim 
Company, Cincinnati, Ohio; 
Hard Company, Buffalo, New 


RUSSELL E. NELSON 

York ; and Drayton Castle 
Limited. England. 

The dental sundries section 
includes Kerr; Miner Dental 
Products, Emeryville, 
California; and Kerr Europe 
S.p.A.. Italy. 

The professional equipment 
group includes Ritter; Karl 
BaischK G.. Germany : Ritter 
A.G . Germany; and Ritter de 
Mexico S. A de C.V., Mexico. 

In addition to their 
responsibilities as group 
executives, the four will 
continue ir. their current 
division position — Conway 
as executive vice president of 
Heritage Dental Laboratories, 
Seattle, Washington: 
McGrath as president of 
Castle Company. Rochester. 
New York; Nelson as 
president of Kerr Manufac- 
turing Company, Romulus; 
and Stemler as president of 
Ritter Company, Rochester 

S > hr t» u C o r p o r a t o n 
manufactures and sells on a 
worldwide basis a diversified 
line of equipment and supplies 
in four principal product 
areas professional health 
products for physicians, 
dentists, hospitals and 
laboratories; instrumentation 


s> stems and equipment; 
process equipment and water 
and waste treatment equip- 
ment; and specialty 
chemicals. 

Sales in 1971 were $355 
million. Health products 
accounted for $145 million, or 
41 per cent, of total sales 

Nelson has served as 
president of Kerr since 1966 
Brfore that he was vice 
president -finance for six 
vears He joined Kerr in 1939, 
was named office manager in 
1945. chief accountant in 1948. 
controller in 1951 and 
treasurer in 1953. 

\ graduate of Walsh 
College, he participated in the 
executive development 
program at the Graduate 
School of Business Ad- 
ministration at the University 
of Michigan. 

lie is a member <£«&e 
Governing Board os^he 
American Dental Trade 
Association. Engineering 
Society of Detroit, Tax 
Executives Institute. National 
Association of Accountants 
and Economic Club of Detroit. 
He is also a member and past 
president of the Walsh College 
Alumni Association and a 
director of the Michigan State 
Chamber of Commerce. 

He and his wife, who are the 
parents of three children, 
reside in Plymouth. 


Mrs. Nancy Chaney, 32, of 
5882 Daniels, Taylor, head of 
the Citizens Against Busing in 
America (CAB), is seeking 
election for the state 
representative post in the 38th 
District. 

Mrs. Chaney, a Democrat, 
will compete in the Aug. 8 
primary election against 
incumbent State Rep. Edward 
E. Mahalak of Romulus, who 
is seeking his fifth term, and 
Elmer Parraghi, former 
supervisor of Sumpter 
Township. 

The only Republican run- 
ning for the post is Joanne B. 
Elliott of Flat Rock. 

Mrs. Chaney and her 
husband. Ronald, employed 
by the Great Lakes Steel 
Corp , are the parents of two 
daughters, Rhonda, 9, and 
Barbara, 11. 

In commenting on her 
candidacy, Mrs. Chaney said 
Rep. Mahalak “hasn’t come 
out against busing. Our group 
has said that it will do 
everything it can to get 
politicians, who haven’t 
responded to the people’s 
views, out of office.” 

“More than 85 per cent of 
the voters in the 38th District 
are opposed to busing,” said 

Hoffman 
to seek 
2nd term 

Garence J. Hoffman Jr., 34, 
of 45100 Dunn Rd.. Sumpter 
Township, former towmship 
olerk. is seeking re-election to 
another two-year term in the 
Aug 8 primary election. 

Hoffman, first elected to the 
township board in 1968 when 
he ran for a four-year term as 
trustee, was elected clerk in 
1970. 

Before taking the oath as 
clerk, Hoffman had to resign 
his trustee’s post on the board. 

In last w-eek’s issue, it was 
inadvertently reported that 
Hoffman w’as seeking his first 
term as clerk and that he had 
been previously appointed to 
fill a vacancy on the township 
hoard. 

Hoffman, married and the 
father of two children, has 
been a resident of the com- 
munity for the last 27 years. 
He also served as township 
constable. He is employed by 
*he Ford Motor Co. 

Hoffman, along with other 
members of the township 
hoard, were ousted in a 
special recall election held on 
May 16. 


Professional rodeo 
set over weekend 


ALL NEWLY REAAODELED 

FINE FOOD 

• BREAKFAST starling al 7 a.m. •FISH FRY on Friday 

• BUSINESSMEN'S LUNCH •PIZZA - Phone 753-9088 

TIMMY'S TABU 

FAMILY RESTAURANT 

37229 HURON RIVER DR.. NEW 80STON 

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 


A professional rodeo, 
s|tonsored by the Huron Valley 
Conservation Association 
iHVCA), will be held this 
weekend at the 4-H 
Fairgrounds, located at the I- 
94 Expressway and the 
Belleville Road interchange. 

Evening performances are 
scheduled for Friday and 
Saturday, with an afternoon 
performance slated for 
Sunday 

The rodeo, which will be the 
first ever held in Western 
Wayne County, is sanctioned 
by the International Rodeo 
Association. Professional 
cowboys and cowgirls will be 
vying for prize money and 


J & J Auto Parts 

SPECIALIZING IN 

REBUILT STARTERS AND ALTERNATORS 
FOR AMERICAN AND FOREIGN CARS 
FULL 90 DAY WARRANTY! 




941-4020 
35775 GODDARD RD., ROMULUS 


WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF AUTO PARTS A ACCESSORIES 



points that count toward this 
year’s national cham- 
pionships. 

The events will include 
bareback bronc riding, calf 
roping, saddle bronc riding, 
steer wrestling, bull riding, 
team roping and cowgirl 
barrel racing. 

Profits from the event will 
be used by the NVCA to send 
boys to the Michigan United 
Conservation Clubs (MUCC) 
training camp and hunter 
training classes. 

The association will also 
make donations to local 
community projects such as 
the Ypsilanti Boys’ Club and 
the Michigan Nature 
Association. 

Tickets may be purchased 
at the Wayne Chamber of 
Commerce, Hoots Boots Store 
in Belleville and the Keg 
Party Store in Ypsilanti. 


MRS. NANCY CHANEY 

Mrs. Chaney, “yet Mahalak 
was against a state anti- 
busing amendment and 
against a motion to bring that 
amendment to a vote a second 
time.” 

Mrs. Chaney, a licensed 
practical nurse, recently was 
elected a precinct delegate 
committed to George Wallace 
in Taylor. She is the secretary 
of her school PTA in Taylor. 

A member of the Wesleyan 
Methodist Church, she was a 
Girl Scout troop organizer and 
leader. 

The CAB has been active 
since last September, when 
Federal District Court Judge 
Stephen Roth ruled Detroit 
and its suburban school 
districts were guilty of “de 
jure” segregation. 

The 38th District includes 
the western portion of Wayne, 
most of the City of Romulus. 
Sumpter Township, Huron 
Township and the northern 
portion of Monroe County. 

Rubbish 

contract 

amended 

The Romulus City Council 
has approved the inclusion of 
an additional clause in the 
city’s new three-year rubbish 
collection contract prohibiting 
any subcontracting without 
city council's consent. 

Tlie council acted following 
a suggestion by Councilman 
James C. Stewart that the new 
contract contain such a clause 
to prevent any trucks other 
than those of the city- 
approved rubbish collection 
contractor picking up rubbish 
in the City of Romulus. 

Stewart reported that he 
heard reports that this has 
occurred 

Tlie city council approved a 
rubbish collection contract 
several weeks ago with the 
American Rubbish Disposal 
Co. of Plymouth. 

The motion to approve the 
contract amendment w'as 
made by Councilman Fred 
Junior Block. He was sup- 
ported bv Councilman William 
M Oakley. The motion was 
unanimously approved 

Mulberry 

resigns 

board 

Gene F Mulberry of 37815 
Wick Rd., Romulus, has 
submitted his resignation as 
chairman of the Romulus 
Board of Appeals, a post he 
has held since 1970. 

The Romulus Council ac- 
cepted the resignation with 
“regrets” and instructed Gty 
Clerk Leonard J. Folmar to 
send the council’s thanks and 
appreciation for services 
rendered as chairman of the 
board of appeals. 

Mulberry reported that his 
firm is transferring his job out 
of the city. 

A successor will be named 
atjihe next council session. 


VAN BUREN TOWNSHIP 


I 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

A Public Hearing on the proposed Land Use Map for the £: 
Township of Van Buren will be held by the Van Buren :g 
Township Planning Commission in the Council Room, •£ 
46425 Tyler Road, Van Buren Township, County of Wayne, jx 
Belleville, Michigan, on Wednesday the 12th day of July, 
1972 at 8:00 P.M. £i 

A copy of the proposed Land Use Map is available for 
viewing at the Van Buren Township Planning Commission £. 
Office, 46425 Tyler Road, Van Buren Township. County of £: 
Wayne, Belleville, Michigan, from 8:00 A M. to 5:00 P.M. 
Monday through Friday. 


Charles Walls, Chairman 
Planning Commission 
Erma J . Payne. Gerk 
:£ Van Buren Township 


4 


» 







Monday. July 3. 1972 


A PANAX PUBLICATION - 



The Romulus Recreation Department will meet at 8 p.m. 
Tuesday at the Romulus Municipal Building, 11111 S. Wayne 
Rd. 

The Romulus Board of Education will meet at 7:30 p.m. 
Monday at the school district’s Administration Building 
36520 Grant Rd. 

The Romulus Board of Appeals will meet at 7:30 p.m. next 
Wednesday at the Romulus Municipal Building 11111 S 
Wayne Rd 

The Huron Township Board of Education will meet at 8 
p.m. next Wednesday at the township hall, 37290 Huron River 
Dr., New Boston. 

Coed bike trip 
slated Saturday 

Romulus will be the stop-off 
point Saturday for the first 
“RomuJus-T&vlor Cbed Bike Hike. ” 

Biking enthusiasts will 
gather at the Romulus Help 
Center, located at 35085 
Goddard Rd , to be joined by 
local “hikers” for the second 
half of a trek to the Lower 
Huron Metropolitan Park 
swimming pool. 



3 


Tlu* event, sponsored by the 
Southern Planning Council of 
the Western Wayne County 
YWCA, will mark the first of a 
series of social and 
recreational events planned 
for teenagers and young 
adults 

“It’s just for fun.” says “Y” 
Coordinator Sue Slolman. “No 
causes, protests or messages, 
except that young people are 


pretty nice and need some 
organized activities to bring 
neighboring communities 
together.” 

On duty at the help center 
will Ik* Mrs. Mary Smiegel 
Mrs. Patt Lucke, Jeff Flint. 
Phil Wilhide, and Ron Young 
who will welcome the 
travelers and serve pop and 
chips 

Romulus bikers may con- 
tact the center at 941-7980 to 
register for the hike 
Departure time from the 
center will be about noon. 

Those participating will pay 
a 25 cent entry fee and should 
bring a sack lunch and 
swimming togs. 

Accompanying autos will 
carry excess gear and 
exhausted hikers, if needed 


LIBRARY HOLDS ANNIVERSARY - The Romulus 
Public Library, 11121 S. Wayne Rd.. marked its first an- 
niversary last Friday. Many area residents attended the 
affair, touring the library and inspecting Us facilities. Among 
the early arrivals viewing a wall picture display with Miss 


Diane Covert (left), librarian, are (from left) City Clerk 
Leonard J. Folmar. Deputy City Clerk Mrs. Deanna 
Lovenduski and City Treasurer Albert Glinski. 

—Romulus Roman photo 


PCHA clarified 


(Continued from Page 1) 
wives attending conference 
trips was termed a 
“typographical error” by the 
letter’s author. Smith said. 

Instead of reading such 
expenses “were reimbursed 
by PCHA,” the sentence 
should have read “were 
reimbursed to PCHA.” Smith 
said. 

He said the attorney 
general’s office. after 
discussion, agreed that it did 
not take a 2-3 vote of the board 
to approve a revised budget, 
something which had been 
questioned in the letter. 

Pizzimenti last night 
released copies of a letter sent 
to Smith Wednesday from the 
attorney general's office, 
which deals the board of any 
wrongdoings in handling 
expense accounts. 

Tin- letter cites the one of 
nine months ago and explains 
that, after further information 
was received, a revised staff 
report was issued by the 
treasury department to the 
attorney general’s office. 

The new report “shows that 
officers and employees at- 
tending conventions had 
submitted expense accounts 
and that proper returns of 
unused advances were made, 
and that no authority funds 
were expended for lodging or 
meals r or waives of officers.” 

The letter also noted that the 
board had formally amended 
its expense policy in January 
to conform w'ith a court order 
and that all expenses of all 
officers and employes in the 
PC^HA were being handled in 
acv rdance with the court 
order 

Several board members still 
criticized Pizzimenti and 
Smith for keeping the report 
secret, maintaining that, had 
they known about it and 
discussed it at a meeting, it 
never would have erupted into 


the issue it has caused during 
the past week. 

Ti;»(\ Salisbury, member- 
at-large who was recently 
recalled from the Ecorse City 
Council, called the new' letter 
a “whitewash job.” however, 
maintaining that several 
discrepencies still existed in 
PCHA matters which were 
being ignored. 

Salisbury took credit for the 
improvements which had been 
made since the time the 
inquiry began He was on the 
Ecorse council when it passed 
the resolution demanding that 
the state attorney general 
investigate the PCHA. after 
which the PCHA board im- 
mediately followed suit to 
prove if there had been 
wrongdoing. 

He called certain parts of 
the old letter a lie, par- 
ticularly a reference to him 
which states Salisbury 
“presented no documen- 
tation” to his city council to 
substantiate his ’ allegations 
against the board, on which he 
was serv ing. 

Salisbury said last night he 
had provided documentation 
and insisted he had more 
evidence of wrongdoing. He 
said his only interest in 
“starting this mess” had been 
to get the board to “stop doing 
things I felt were wrong.” 

Salishui > refused to answer 
when questioned by board 
members to produce his 
evidence, a tactic he has used 
several times before with the 
board. 

Ypsilanti representative 
Timothy Dyer lashed out at 
the newspaper which had first 
printed the story on the nine- 
month-old letter, calling it 
“yellow press at its worst” 
and a paper which did “not 
investigate stories.” 

Dyer termed the paper a 
“harassment” which would 
“print anything,” and “an 
insult to the board and 
people.” 


‘Y* tennis 
program eyed 

“Tennis Anyone?" asks the 
Southern Planning Council of 
the Western Wayne Count v 
YWCA 

Tennis instruction will begin 
immediately at a Romulus 
court if there are sufficient 
registrations, says Mrs. Sue 
Stolmar. coordinator for the 
council. Six lessons will cost 
$12 to members. For more 
information call Mrs. Stolmar 
at 551-4110 

Those who serve on the 
planning council from 
Romulus are Mrs. Lorena 
Burton. Mrs. Edith Round- 
tree. Mrs. Nolene Suissene. 
Mrs. E W. McAnally, Mrs. 
Bea Suiter and Mrs. Dorothy 
Ball. 

Council resets 
citizens’ ‘time’ 

Citizens’ discussion periods 
before Romulus City Council 
will be conducted earlier at 
future council meetings. 

At the suggestion of Council 
President Jimmie Raspberry, 
the council last week ap- 
proved the rescheduling of the 
discussion period. 

Raspberry, in asking to shift 
the discussion period, pointed 
out that at previous council 
sessions it was a late hour in 
the evening when the citizens 
had their opportunity to speak 
before the council or Lsk 
questions. 


Mayor Smith platform 
is larger than budget 


Mayor Royce E Smith of 
Belleville says his campaign 
f°r the Democratic 
nomination for state 
representative in the new 22nd 
District is going to include "a 
bigger platform than budget.” 

“I might be running on the 
smallest budget ever spent for 
a state office,” the 56-year 
Smith, an eight— year, four— 
term mayor and former 
Wayne County supervisor, 
said this week. 

“Bui it has been my ex- 
perience from some 14 years 
in public office that if I am 
fortunate enough to be elected 
by people of this district to 
represent them in Lansing. I 
don’t want to go therewith any 
ties, or owing any favors for 
financial assistance.” 

That doesn't mean Smith 
won’t be asking for “support” 
of another kind, however. 

I have a specific platform 
which is being publicly 
presented and on which, if 
citizens of this district agree, I 
am asking them for support by 
giving me their vote and 
encouraging that of their 
friends and neighbors,” Smith 
said 

In brief Smith’s platform 
stresses the following: 


Ballroom 
exhibition set 

The Romulus Senior 
Citizens Club has scheduled a 
ballroom exhibition dance at 
12:30 P.M. Tuesday at the 
municipal building, located at 
Mill S Wayne Rd 

Ed Parker will perform the 
ballroom darlee exhibition for 
club members. The exhibition 
is free. 

For further information 
contact the Romulus 
Department of Parks and 
Recreation at 941-0666. 

Teacher quits 

Mrs. Bess Sil version has 
announced her resignation 
from the teaching staff of the 
Romulus Community School 
District. 

Mrs. Silverston, who 
teaches special education at 
the Romulus Junior High 
School, said that she is leaving 
the state. 


1 — Stale lax reform for 
public education by 
eliminating the tax on 
residential property, 
replacing it with a graduated 
income lax at state level. 

2 — Stronger state and local 
cooperative programs for 
vocational education in which 
government would help set up 
programs and facilities for 
training 

3 — More intensified efforts 
for better roads, water, sewer 
and drainage for areas which 
need them 

A — Increased and 
modernized police service, 
partially a program which 
would offer college training in 
criminal justice to returning 
servicemen and possibly some 
subsidation for his early 
employment with police 
departments. 

5 — Help to communities in 
certain recreation and 
pollution problems— such as 
those local communities are 
experiencing with Ford and 
Belleville lakes. 



The words of the scriptures are a comfort in 
time of sorrow. Our memorial service uses 
the inspirational words of the Bible to 
console the living while paying tribute to the 
beloved memory of the departed. 

ROBERTS BROS. Inc 

FUNERAL HOME 

209 Main St., Corner of 2nd., Belleville 
Phone 697-9400 


WAYNE COUNTY ROAD 
COMMISSION 

JScSS.n UPerV, * 0r C ' ,r, ‘ 01 Tow "‘ h 'P « Van Buren W.»n, County. 
Sirs 

CouMy *o?VVo^ , «lcn^n m nw' h ^ BMra °' C °'"" v R0M Commissioner, ot me 
toumy oi Wayne. Michigan, did. at a meeting of said Board held on June wv) 

n?f e r C / m ; ne ,haf the <" ,al " a^r.bed InZ mfnuteJ of « «?B«rd 

should be a County road under the jurisdiction of the Board of County Road 
Commissioners The minutes of said meeting fully descr7b ng saw roid ar2 

hereby made a part of this notice, and are as follows 1C ,mn ° sa, ° road are 

Minutes of the regular meeting of the Baord of County Road *» 

of W E a!Je Mic°htaan?hallt. K B °k of County Road Commissioner* of the County 
2. her « b v accepts the dedication to the use of the public of 

the following described road and »t is hereby taken oyer as a county roid and 
madeap a rtof the county roadsystemof the County of Wayne 
That portion of the N W 'a of Section 20. T 3S R 8E van Buren Tnw«,n*hin 
Wayne County, Michigan, which Is described as follows Beginning at a point in 
the north line of existing Denton Road, distant the following s courses and 
distances from the N W corner of Section 20. viz N ev degrees 22’ 30^E 2i! oo 
feet S 0 degrees 06 35' E . 63 00 feet, N 8? degrees 77 30 " E rtVlliJun 
degrees 23' 20" W . 748 17 feet and S 65 degrees 57 40° E ' U is MS anS 

66 00 feet, thence S 42 degrees 10* 39" w 31 92 feet to a point o?curJature Whence 
™ ° ? cur . ve ' concave ,0 ,h * northwest. 134 20 feet, radius of slid ^e 
W 30" W 125*58 feet 'to tKi?^ S V 4V ‘ aod chord faring S 76 degrees 
?«” .. de iJo %%£ S2T n ° 0 «• ">"• O' county 

.ol^inTvoTe"*’ iUPB0, ' ta Comm,»»n,r .no urnM by m. 

Ayes Commissioners Neudeck and Burton 
Nays None 

Commissioner Berry abstained Irom voting 

wSIkSctFoI %?OTIndS> Bv v,rtue oe act no 

Co“',‘Tj V «nt a*0 • mf" her '°"’ 0 n *" a *' Michigan 

BOA R o OF COUNTY ROAD COMMISSIONERS 
OF THE COUNTY OF WAYNE. MICHIGAN 
Michael Berry. Chairman 
Philip j Neudeck. Vice Chairman 
Freddie G Burton. Commissioner 
By Henry J Gateckl 
Secretary and Clerk of the Board 


Despite a certain emphasis 
on cooperation and subsidized 
programs by government, 
Smith said his platform should 
not he construed as in anv way 
endorsing further state or 
larger government controls. 

“Quite the contrary he 
states, “I am specifically for 
local controls at all city, 
county, township and par- 
ticularly school district levels” 
“It has always been my 
relief that the only areas 
government of any kind 
should get involved in are 
those in which the citizenry or 
private business either can- 


not. or cannot reasonably, 
handle for themselves. 

“The programs I propose in 
my campaign platforms are 
those in which state govern- 
ment should mainly assist 
local governments — at some 
pointy even relinquishing 
existing controls and 
jurisdictions " 

In addition to his 14 years in 
public office in Belleville and 
Wayne County governments, 
Smith has been distributing 
agent for Atlantic— Richfield 
Oil Co. since 1947. 


It’s time to sign 
for LL football 


Romulus Little League 
Football teams will kick off 
Ibeir fifth year of activity on 
Saturday, July 15. when boys 
between 9 and 12 years of age 


Wrong 

address 


C^rl T Renton, one of thr«.«? 
Republican candidate*; 
seeking election to the two- 
year trustee term on the 
Huron Township Board in the 
Aug 8 primary, resides at 
27568 River Lane, Huron 
Township and not in Trenton 
as inadvertently reported in 
last week’s issue. 

Renton is employed as the 
business manager of the 
Huron School District. 


will register at the Romulus 
Civic Center 

According to Dave Mc- 
Crory. registrations will begin 
at 9 a.m. and continue through 
5 p.m. when more than Too 
boys are expected to register 
for one of the three divisions 
sponsored by the association. 

Bovs who are accompanied 
by a parent, have a birth 
certificate and pay a $10 fee, 
may be assigned to the Fresh- 
man, Junior Varsity or 
Varsity divisions, McCrory 
said. 

The season will fregin on 
Sept io and continue through 
Nov. 5. with eight games 
scheduled. 

For more information 
contact Dave at 941-3349. 


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I 


Auxiliary helps 
buy equipment 


The Women’s Auxiliarv of 
the Romulus Youth Baseball 
Association is resting from a 
few hectic weeks of activity to 
raise funds for the 31 Little 
League baseball teams 
sponsored y the association 

Mrs Marge McCrory. 
auxiliary president, reports 
that last Friday s car wash, 
held at Martin’s Marathon 
Station at Wayne and Wick 
roads, was so successful that 
it left the mothers* soaking 
w'et. exhausted and $62 closer 
to their $5.i)00 fund raising 
goal for this year 

“Wehad to quit at 4:45 p.m., 
not because we had run out of 
cars because we really did a 
brisk business, but we had to 
hurry home and get ready for 
a game that evening.” she 
explains. 

A ceramics raffle, held June 
25 at the Jaycees carnival 


netted profits from 116 raffle 
tickets Winners were Mrs 
Grace Kiss. Kenneth Bird and 
Mrs. Mildred Hall 

“The rest should be easy/’ 
Mrs McCrory observes “We 
are having a bake sale at 
Vescio’s on July R and a paper 
drive on July 15.” Those 
wanting papers picked up at 
their homes may contact Mrs 
McCrory at 941-3349. Ms 
Gladys Finch at 9H-8618 or 
Mrs Virginia Bird at 941-1037 

An awards night is also in 
the planning, says Mrs. Mc- 
Crory. It is scheduled for 
Monday. Aug 14, at the 
Romulus Senior High School 
auditorium. 

Another highlight of this 
year’s season will take place 
July 13-15 when Romulus hosts 
the Senior League Playoffs at 
the Romulus High School 
baseball field. 


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Lansing report 


Campers caught betwixt and between... 


By DON HOENSHELL, Daily Eagle Lansing Bureau chief 



Rowdies on motorcycles and afoot are invading the quiet 
family playgrounds at Michigan’s state parks demanding 
money and terrorizing campers. 

Law enforcement officers are overwhelmed and fearful 
vacationers are demanding protection. 

Legislators who earmarked $155,000 for 20 new officers to 
handle the problem are fighting mad at the prospect that 
somehow they might be held responsible for the violence. 

And there it is, another classic clash between the 
generations that nobody wants to admit or to which nobody 
can find a handy solution. 

“These kids aren’t immoral, they’re amoral,” said Col. 
John R. Plants. “Nobody has taught them values, to respect 
other people and their property.’’ 

Plants, director of the Michigan State Police, said he will 
order his troopers in the field to patrol the parks whenever 
possible in the hope that visible force will help. 

The incident which created the furor occurred at Houghton 
Lake State Forest Campground on the Memorial Day 


weekend when 200 to 300 youths pounded on cars, barricaded 
a road and demanded money from campers. 

Warren Shapton, deputy director of the Department of 
Natural Resources for field operations, ordered the cam- 
pground closed under after July 4 or until “the DNR can 
afford fulltime supervision.” 

Rep. William R. Copeland (D- Wyandotte), chairman of the 
House appropriations committee, called a summit meeting 
with Plants. DNR officials and National Guard General 
Clarence C Schnipke. 

Copeland and Rep. Russell Heilman (D- Do liar Bay) made 
two points in a shouting match with sufficient decibels to 
rattle the capitol dome: 

Keep the parks open and don’t blame us. 

They were counseled to present a low profile to forestall 
escalation of the invasions on the one hand and to prevent 
treasonable fears among vacationists. 

“Dammit, I don’t want to be careful,” Copeland shouted. 
“You don’t treat these young hoodlums with kids gloves.” 

What angered Copeland and Heilman was the implication 


by Shapton that the DNR couldn’t afford fulltime supervision 
when the legislature had provided $155,000 last year. 

“They haven’t even filled the positions we authorized,” 
Heilman said. “I’m getting tired of getting the blame 
whenever a department gets in trouble.” 

Plants knows probably better than anyone that, by the time 
law enforcement people arrive at disturbance in the park, it 
is usually all over and whatever damage there may be is 
done 

And 20 men cannot provide fulltime supervision at the state 
parks all over the state. 

But even a massive hiring of officers won’t solve the 
problem when it spreads t the scores of federal campgrounds 
where Michigan officers have no jurisdiction. 

Thus there was a typical reaction: Growing fear among the 
campers who enjoy a quiet vacation with the kids, the 
oemana tnat police do the impossible and the fear among 
political people that they will be blamed. 

The commentary on society takes two directions. 


— Politics has reached the point where every major 
problem is approached either by money or bluff and instant 
solutions are demanded. 

— Nothing is ever done until a crisis arrives and the gears 
of destruction have been set in motion. 

Copeland ordered Plants and the DNR to coordinate their 
efforst to restore peace to the parks. They have scheduled 
meetings to talk it over. 

Gen. Schnipke said he couldn’t sned National Guardsmen 
into the pars without a declaration of emergency by Gov. 
William G. Milliken. which in itself would create a greater 
public fear. 

“Lacking that. I really don't know what my rie can e,” he 
said. 

And nobody has the power to embue the young with 
retroactive responsibility - but there is still time for »heir 
younger brothers and sisters. 

And as Milliken and others have stated, the real task lies 
before adults and their institutions. 


Opinions only 

Ours... ...Others 

Enterprise-Roman 

Page A-4 Wednesday, July 5, 1972 

Another opinion 

Give lottery jobs 
to qualified jobless 


Politicians being what they are and 
patronage being a valued adjunct to the 
IKilitical trade, one probably should have 
predicted the hassle in Lansing which has 
delayed the start of the multi-million dollar 
state lottery operation. 

l/'gislalion to set up controls and persons 
who will operate the legal betting machinery 
are the points of contention. 

Democrats do not want a single, all- 
jxtwcrful commissioner such as has run the 
state-controlled liquor business in the past. 
Ibis single “czar” could be appointed by Go . 
William G. Milliken. 

Were this to happen, the Democrats might 
not have their hands in on dispensing the 
considerable patronage which goes with 
putting up ticket-issuing machines in com- 
munities all over the 83 counties. 

Hence the Democrats seem to lean toward a 
three-member commission which would be of 
mixed political versuasions. 

Several proposals have been put forth by 
the Democrats. One of them 
would ri'quire an assistant director, not of 
either the party of the director or governor, to 
lx* in charge of the betting machinery. 

When this compromise did not meet ap- 
proval the Democrats asked for a recess to 
huddle. 

•Wi en the Democrats, who rule the House 
•old hive a 19-all standoff in the Senate, will 
agree on a single plan has not been obvious. 
Ry I he time this appears, the hassle may 
have been settled 

Involved in setting up the machinery are a 

* lumber of well-paying jobs, plus hundreds of 
•thers throughout the state such as the scores 
f offices of the Secretary of State’s depart- 

• •*nl. so the patronage issue is one made to 
i lor for a partisan squabble. 

V an example, Rep David S. Holmes (D- 
Dctrojt has suggested a plan whereby the 
governor, with the chairman and one other 
officer of the major opposition party, picking 

New payment 


Unthinkable. 

That's the first reaction to the letter 
Senator Alvin DeGrow, Republican from 
Pigeon, circulated to all hospitals and most 
news media in the state. 

Unthinkable until you probe a little. The 
facts are that today all, or nearly all, 
hospitals find accreditation by Blue Cross the 
first essential for survival. 

That’s because Blue Cross pays on the basis 
of the hospital’s costs and not on the basis of 
certain pre-determined policy limit. 

It’s the boon and bane of the system. The 
patients have the best of care and the 
Itnspilals know that the money will be there. 

Because it is a virtual blank check it has to 
result in bigger expenses while at the same 
time providing the finest care. 

Because it does pay on the basis of hospital 
expense. Blue Cross wants to limit the 
hospitals it accredits . . . facilities that 
provide duplicate service, facilities that 
provide inadequate service and facilities that 
arc too small to be efficient. 

And the cost per patient a day is not 
necessarily a true gauge of the efficiency of 
the hospital. A low patient-day cost can be due 
to efficient operation or it may mean a low 
level of services, inadequate supervision and 
generally inferior health care 

It's hard for even the experts to pin down 

It's natural for Senator DeGrow to have 
concern about the two proposed bills in the 
legislature Pigeon has just recently con- 
cluded a massive campaign that has built a 
sparkling new facility for the community. 

To those who donated to make it a reality 
it's unthinkable that it could be forced out of 
business 


an assistant director with a $32,500 salary 
The proposed pay for the director would be 
$35,000. 

Add to these the hundreds who will fill local 
positions in dispensing tickets and you have 
juicy plums with which politicians can 
strenghten themselves in the hustings. 

Under Holmes’ plan, the assistant director 
would be of the political party, either 
Democrat or Republican, represented by the 
two politicians meeting with the governor. 
This plan is further conditioned by the proviso 
that if the man chosen director has no iden- 
tifiable party afiliation, the assistant could 
not be of the governor’s party. 

So, the further it goes the stickier it gets, 
and the mind boggles. But the politicians, 
faithfut to the party's interest and per- 
petuation, see sense in all of it. 

While we are not naive enough to believe 
that this is going to be settled in a nonpartisan 
manner, the temptation is to wish it could be 
settled by bipartisan agreement that the jobs 
go to qualified men and women who are in 
need of work. 

We have thousands of unemployed persons 
who are qualified in Michigan today. 

Because these workers undoubtedly will 
come under the civil service umbrella, we 
would hope the choices would be made 
judiciously and to persons to whom the 
legislators are not politically beholden. 

Today’s unemployed include thousands of 
persons who are col lege -trained, such as 
qualified teachers now in an excess 
profession. 

Thousands ajre young and deserving with 
families to support. In our opinion, these 
people, no matter what their political per- 
suasion, are more deserving than political 
persuasion, are more deserving than political 
hacks now employed. 

Let's be selective in doling out these jobs 


system eyed 


For the rest of us, it is equally unthinkable 
that Blue Cross should be spent where the 
authorities feel there will be a continuing 
health care. 

It’s easy to be objective about this. It's not 
Hills and Dales Hospital that is on the 
threatened list . . one of the hospitals “not 
programmed for future expansion or 
existence.” Not this year anyway. 

Hills and Dales became the hospital for the 
area after Caro turned down Hill-Burton 
funds because there was no local interest. 

Hospital licenses are renewed each year 
and anything is possible. 

Perhaps in another decade Cass City could 
be on the phase out list. It's not unthinkable. 

Still, the tremendous increase in rates for 
health care makes it mandatory that the 
hospitals and the entire system of Blue Cross 
insurance payments come under closer 
scrutiny. 

That there have been abuses goes without 
saying Blue Cross should not be required to 
make payments to every hospital Hospitals 
should not have the unrestricted right to the 
insurance regardless of cost in relation to 
services performed 

On the other hand, maybe it’s time for a 
new system of hospital payment a system 
that might lessen the tremendous costs by 
making it less expensive for the subscriber if 
he uses the service less Make it a matter of 
self-interest to reduce costs 

We need a continual pruning of the excesses 
in our health care system 

Anything else is . . unthinkable 

—Cass City Chronicle 



AMERICA, AMERICA, GOD SHED HIS GRACE ON THEE ... 

4 1 

Public officials forum 


Several key bills 
top House agenda 


Pushing toward its summer 
recess, the House is in the 
midst ' of a heavy workload 
that requires long hours of 
floor sessions. * 

Included are appropriations 
bills. The House, having 
cleared all of its own budget 
measures, faces seven ap- 
propriations bills previously 
approved by the Senate. They 
cover school aid, colleges and 
universities, junior and 
community colleges, the 
department of education, 
mental health, corrections 
and drug abuse ap- 
propriations. 

There will also be an effort 
to pass a substitute version of 
a Senate bill which creates a 
state lottery and obtain Senate 
concurrence before the 
recess. This will be necessary 
if the lottery, approved by 
voters in the May 16 election, 
is to be started sometime in 
the fall. 

Another key item is no-fault 
auto insurance. The House 
insurance committee is ex- 
pected to report out a no-fault 
bill, reportedly a substitute 
version of a measure passed 
Ihe Senate. 

Top priority goes to the 
budget bills. In a number of 
instances, the House and 
Senate will have to work out 
differences in their two ver- 
sions of the same ap- 
propriations bills and it may 
be that some will be forced 
into House-Senate conference 
committees 

Although the House ap- 
propriations Committee 
made few changes in the 
Senate editions of several 
budget bills, the huge school 
aid bill in particular is bound 
to take up much time on the 
House floor and possibly in 
conference committee 

The bill emerged from the 
House Appropriations 
Committee at $1 138 billion, or 
about $27 million more than 
the Senate version, hut still $24 



B\ Kdwaid E. Mahalak 
State Representative 
38lh District 

million less than the House 
Education Committee 
Recommended 
The bill also contains 
controversial sections dealing 
with teacher retirement and 
the transportation ap- 
propriation is uncertain 
because of the Detroit School 
desegregation order. 

In reducing education 
committee recommendations, 
the appropriations committee 
trimmed $10 million from the 
municipal overburden section, 
$3 million for a program for 
high unemployment districts, 
and reduced certain special 
education funds and the 
budget for vocational 
education. The committee 


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also cut $600,000 irom the 
transportation allocation. 

In the retirement section, 
the appropriations committee 
incorporated a schedule of 
retirement allowance in- 
creases for teachers who 
retired after July 1, 1956. This 
would cost an estimated $4.3 
million 

However, the most con- 
troversial retirement 
provisions may be the con- 
tribution increase for outstate 
teachers, from three per cent 
on the first $4,200 to five per 
cent on all earnings. Coupled 
with a benefit increase that 
would benefit outstate per- 
sonnel making less than $8,400 
a year. 

Some opponents of the 
provisions, including the 
Michigan Education 
Al >ciation, contend they are 
illegal because they require 
higher-income teachers to pay 
for benefit increases they will 
not receive. The bill makes the 
benefit increases contingent 
upon a ruling of the State 
Supreme Court as to the 
legality of the provisions. 

Tin* higher education bill 
was increased about $5.7 
million over the Senate ver- 
sion. Several schools would 
receive substantial increases 
from the Senate version for 
academic or program im 
provement; that is, money 
that can be distributed to 
departments at the univer- 
sity’s discretion. 

Michigan State University 
received $2 million of the 
increase, the University of 
Michigan $2 4 million. 
Western Michigan University 
$700,000 and Eastern Michigan 
University $400.0000 

The community colleges bill 
was reported at $57.6 million, 
corrections at $39 6 million, 
drug abuse programs at $5.2 
million, mental health at 
$2189 million and the 
Department of Education at 
$37 3 million 


Our readers write 

EDITOR’S NOTE: The Daily Eagle and Associated 
Newspapers, Inc. welcome letters from our readers. Letters 
must Include signature - with names also typed or printed 
legibly - and address, which will be withheld upon request, 
and telephone number for our own use If necessary. If group 
designation is requested in signature, list of members 
names, addresses and telephone numbers must be included. 
Letters should be typed double-spaced or written clearly and 
should not exceed 300 words. All are subject to condensation. 

Alternate solution 
listed for lake , park 

EDITOR’S NOTE— The following letter, addressed to 
Donald Pizzimenti. Public Relations Department. Detroit 
Edison Company, was made available as a letter to the 
editor: 


The recent action of the Board of Trustees of the Township 
of Van Buren, which in essence rejected your offer of 
Belleville Lake and Edison Point Park, has prompted me to 
request your consideration of viable and desirable alter- 
natives. My concern is enhanced as I live on the lake. 

Living on the lake, I would be most distressed if it were sold 
to private interests. Allowing the more crass commercial 
development would retain a tax base for the township, but as 
a public utility I believe it is your responsibility to seek a 
more civiclv concerned solution. 

The most desirable alternative to Van Buren Township 
acceptance of the property is that it be secured by the 
community of Belle' ille. With the lake and park, Belleville 
could grow and prosper, as annexation would be eagerly 
encouraged and sought, at least by those of us residing near 
the lake and park. 

The positive development of this property would give real 
impetus to Belleville’s efforts to annex additional contiguous 
areas. I am sure the tax base of the lake’s property owners, 
that Belleville could gain, would much more than cover the 
costs of maintaining the dam This would make it im- 
mediately economically feasible for Belleville. 

Hie second alternative would be to offer the property to 
nearby communities who may consider a lake and park 
desirable properties. The popularity of Camp Dearborn 
makes it obvious that you should be able to secure this 
desirable alternative very readily. A study of the facilities, 
resident permit system, and organization of Camp Dearborn 
should persuade a desirable community to seek the lake and 
park, its responsibilHes and privileges. 

It would be desirable, and just, that you secure an ac- 
comodation and assurance of lake privileges for the local 
residents who live on the lake. Detroit Edison should also 
require assurance and commitment of a responsible 
development of the park property, for both esthetic -and 
ecological reasons. 

Undoubtedly there are other alternatives you have con- 
sidered. However, as a public utility you have a respon- 
sibility and an obligation to see that the property is trans- 
ferred to a community that will develop it and maintain it as 
a park and recreational facility for its people. 

While this transfer will remove the property from Van 
Buren Township and other tax roles, it will also relieve Van 
Buren from any real or imagined liability. It will leave the 
Van Buren Township recreational fund untapped, secure 
from use in developing park and lake facilities. 

To some it may seem a bit strange to have the park and 
lake owned by another community, closed to local residents, 
but this is much preferable to a commercial development of 
any kind, with its assured loss of the park and possible loss of 
the lake. 

I believe Detroit Edison has the responsibility to see that 
the character ot the Jake and park are retained; that these 
properties are transferred to a community that will maintain 
them for the enjoyment and use of its people. 


L.L. Lorentson, DO. 
44407 Harmony Lane 
An (honestly) concerned citizen 


Belleville Enterprise 

and Legal Times 

Romulus Roman 


Established .n 1805. the Belleville Enterprise « n <j Legal T.mes 
and the Romulus Roman the official newspapers serv.ng the 
cities of Belleville and Romulus and townships ot Huron, bumprer and 
Van Buren are two weekly newspapers published each Wednesday by 
the Associated Newspapers Inc a d.y.s»on of Pana* Corporation at 4)5 
Mam St Belleville. Mich 48111 

The central business office is located at 355*0 Michigan Aye West 
Wayne Mich 48114 

Ollice hours in Belleville Monday, through Friday 8 30 a m to 4 30 
pm Phones 697 919) tor Belleville 9*1 1775 tor Romulus area 313 
Central ollice hours Monday. 030am to « 00 p m Tuesday through 
Friday, 8 30 am to 4 W p m , Saturday, 8 30 a m to noon Phone 779 
4000 

Classified advertising calls al 7?9 3300 and circulation calls at 4460 
during central office business hours 

Subscription rates by mail second class postage paid at Belleville 
Mich 4011). S3 per year in Wayne County \7 per v ear outside ot Wayne 
County SS per year for servicemen Carrier delivery 50c per month 
collected on a monthly basis 

Associated Newspapers, inc retains ownership ol all local news items 
and advertising copy which it helps create or reproduce m its columns 
and such cannot be reproduced by others without permission 


William J Holliday General Manager 
Basil Stevens. Executive Editor 


Stall Members 

Display Ads 

Henry Cantm 

Women s Editor Lee Smith 

Pictures 

Classified ads Diane Ferguson V • 

Classified display ads . ; ' 


Deadlines 
noon Monday 
noon Monday 
?p m Thursday 
noon Friday 
rypon Monday 





Wednesday. July 5, 1972 


A PANAX PUBLICATION - 


Page A-5 



At Baptist Church 


Morin-Leonard vows 
solemnized June 24 


MISS DIFGFL 


Huron grads 
are engaged 


Mr. and Mrs. William 
Diegel of 20817 Middlebelt 
Road. Romulus, announce the 
engagement of their daughter, 
Kathleen Mary, to Robert Lee 
Hickman, son of Mrs. Rupert 
Hickman of 30616 West Road. 
New Boston, and the late Mr. 
Hickman. 

Both young people are 
graduates of Huron High 
School. The bride-elect, who 
completed a Real Estate I 
course, is employed at Astro 
Realty Company in New 
Boston. Her fiance is em- 
ployed as a mechanic and 
manager at a gas station in 
Taylor. 

No date has been set for the 
wedding. 


Grace Baptist Church in 
Belleville was the setting June 
24 for the double ring rite 
which united Linda Gene 
Leonard and David J Morin in 
holy matrimony. 

Red and white gladiolas and 
mums adorned the altar as the 
bride approached on the arm 
of her father. The Rev. Bill 
Gram presided at the seven 
o’clock nuptials before some 
150 friends and relatives. 

Parents of the young couple 
are Mr. and Mrs Albert 
Leonard of 8621 Heather 
Drive. Ypsilanti, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry J Morin of 191 
Clarence Street, Belleville. 

A SPECIAL GUEST. Chuck 
Hoagland, recording artist for 
Sound-Pak label, sang his 
latest release, "A Part of 
Today”, during the ceremony. 

Given in marriage by her 
father, the bride was gowned 
in a floor-length, A-line 
silhouette of re-embroidered 
lace on silk organdy. Styling 
details included a high 
neckline, elbow-length 
sleeves, and a detachable 
watleau train. Delicate rose 
buds adorned the waist and 
neckline with four rows of lace 
bordering the hemline. 

A tall headdress of lace 
topped with a cluster of 
organza roses secured the 
bride’s elbow-length veil of 


silk illusion and she carried 
cascading red rose buds and 
while carnations. 

ATTENDING THE BRIDE 
were Mrs. Linda Sue Capelle 
of Belleville as honor at- 
tendant and Charolette 
Leonard of Ypsilanti, sister of 
the bride, as bridesmaid 

They wore identical frocks 
in mint green dotted swiss and 
pastel pink, respectively. 
Fashioned in the empire 
mode, the gowns were ac- 
cessorized with Camelot 
headpieces securing chapel- 
length veils. Their bouquets of 
carnations were tinted to 
match their ensembles. 

Dressed in a yellow, toe- 
touching frock was the bride’s 
three-year old niece, Angela 
May Leonard, who was 
flowergirl The little nosegay 
she carried was comprised of 
yellow carnations surrounding 
red rose buds. 

Seven-year old Mark Morin 
carried out the role of 
ring bearer. 

The bridegroom asked 
Frank Hoagland of Ypsilanti 
to be best man and groom- 
smen were Lloyd G. McClure, 
the bridegroom s brother-in- 
law from Belleville, and Larry 
A. Leonard and Gary L. 
Leonard, the bride’s brothers 
from Ypsilanti. 


THE EAGLE’S HALL in 
Ypsilanti was reserved for the 
reception which followed with 
some 200 guests attending. 
Receiving friends and 
relatives in formal gowns 
were the bride’s mother in 
pale turquoise crepe with 
silver accessories and the 
bridegroom’s mother in 
powder blue with gold ac- 
cessories. Both were 
presented with corsages of 
white carnations encircling 
ml rose buds. 

For traveling on their 
honeymoon trip to Northern 
Michigan, the new' Mrs. Morin 
chose a white cotton lace pant 
suit. The newlyweds are 
planning to make their home 
in Belleville where both Linda 
and David graduated from 
High School, she in 1967 and he 
in 1968 The bridegroom, a 
graduate of Universal 
Engineering School, served 
with the U.S. Army for two 
years. The bride is employed 
as a nurse at University 
Hospital, Ann Arbor. 

Prior to the wedding, the 
Henry J Morins entertained 
at a rehearsal dinner at their 
home on Clarence Street. 




MRS. DAVID J. MORIN 


Women account for 59 per 
cent of purchases of bedding 
plants and another 35 per cent 
go along with their husbands. 


All Around The Town 


•••With Leo 


Dorins ‘re-wed’ 
in mock nuptials 

CHUCK AND MARY Dorin, spending a quiet summer 
evening with guests, were surprised bevond words when car 
after car began pulling up in front of their home on S. Biggs 
Street and even MORE surprised when they began 
itiloading and piling into their place with shouts of ‘sur- 
prise!’ 

Instigated by Wally and Dorothy Skszek, the caravan of 
neighbors, former neighbors and friends came to wish the 
Dorins a happy 25th wedding anniversary, along with all the 
necessary “fixin’s” for a gala party. 

The highlight of the evening was the mock wedding under 
the direction of “Bishop” Skszek who not only remarried the 
pair, but gave his blessing with a squeegie mop. Ernie Patke 
was on hand to solemnly give the bride away and her two 
sisters and their husbands, Sadie and Hugh Kemp and Annie 
and Dan Ciocan, took on the roles of attendants, .he former 
two Filling the parts they actually played in the Dorin’s 
wedding 25 years prior. 

A happy remembrance of the event - a canopied swing - 
was given the Dorins from the Skszeks and Patkes, the Ar- 
thur Wiertellas, the Bernard Walls, the Harvey Stabnaus, 
Ruth Carter, Thelma Carter Sommer, and Jenny Stalmach. 
Still others in on the gift-giving were the Doug Liedels, the 
Bill Szabos, the Darryl Raymonds, Jr., the Chuck Minthorns, 
the Gene Dudas, the Don Walterses, the Frank Days, and the 
Jerry Masons. 

Visiting with the Dorins at the time of the ‘onslaught’ were 
the Ciocans of Dearborn, the Kemps and Fred Baditoi of 
Denton. 

SEVERAL DAYS laster. on the 25th, the Dorins held open 
house at the Bethany Baptist Church with some 135 friends 
attending the silver celebration. 

A lovely wedding cake, the work and gift of a neighbor, 
Annie Riggs, was served along with assorted cookies, punch, 
and coffee. Mrs. Arleen Williams of Jackson presided at the 
punch bowl, Mrs. Hugh Kemp and Mrs. Dan Ciocan assisted 
with serving, Mrs. B.P. Hopson and Mrs. Elsie Robson 
arranged the tables, and two nieces of the honored couple, 
Jane and Ruth Ciocan , took charge of the guest book. 

Before arriving at the church, the Dorins entertained 65 
close friends and family members at a catered dinner in their 
home at one o’clock. Guests were from Portland, Ionia, 
Jackson, Birmingham, Highland Park, Detroit, Dearborn 
and Belleville. 


Mary is R io 
exchange student 

MARY KOSIN. eldest of the Chet Kosin s daughters, is in 
Rio De Janiero as an exchange student for Youth for Un- 

innit 1 ^ r ng ‘ her , t ave ^ s 0 ™ 150 other young 

people from Michigan, Dlinois, Indiana, and Ohio she 
departed Metro Airport June 21. 

Mary, who’ll be a senior at Belleville High this fall, is the 
foster daughter for the next eight weeks of Senor and 
Senora Humberto Mel Torres. With their four children and 
two maids, the Mel Torreses occupy the entire sixth floor of a 

Ietter St lwme^ artment building in Rio> Mary sa y s in her initial 

While away, Mary will be an art student at the Brazilian 
Society of Fine Arts - a first-time opportunity in this field. 



For and about 

Suburban 

t 

Women 


Bride-to-be 
is ‘ showered ’ 


DEBRA HATCHER was the honored guest June 22 at a 
bridal shower given by Mrs. Charles McBride and Charlotte 
McBride at their home on Cordell in Romulus. 

Some 30 guests from the Romulus area as well as an aunt of 
the prospective bridegroom, Mrs. Ethel Calvette of 
Marquette, attended. Games wit’i a wedding theme were 
played after which a buffet lunch was served and the bride- 
to-be unwrapped her pretty gifts. 

Debra will become the bride of Michael McBride July 8 at 
Prayer Baptist Church in Westland. 


Infant christened ; 
party follows 

LITTLE ANDREW Scott Ostrowski was just a month old 
when he received the sacrament of baptism June 11 at St. 
Anthony’s Catholic Church. Father Raymond Skoney 
presided at the eleven o’clock rite. 

The baby’s God-parents. Jil Jahner and Walt Kilanski , both 
of Wayne, were among the 25 guests who later attended a 
dinner party at the Sumpter Road home of the baby’s 
parents, Larry and Vicky Ostrowski. 

Here ’n there... 

Around the town 

I 

THE HAZEN W. GLARS of Savage Road are back in town 
after spending five days in the East with her son and 
daughter-in-law, John and Lee Bundtzen of Southport, 
Connecticut. The Giars made the trip especially to attend the 
graduation of their first granchild, Michael Bundtzen, at 
Fairfield High. When the Giars returned, via plane, they had 
Mrs. Bundtzen and her two youngest, Carol and Stephen 
along. The trio will be here to visit other relatives and friends 
for the next three weeks .... MRS. DEBBIE REDMOND of 
9951 Harrison, Romulus, was a surgical patient at Annapolis 
Hospital, Wayne, recently. She underwent an operation on 
her knee June 19 and was able to return home a week later. 
Her activities will be somewhat hampered, though since 
she’s restricted by a leg cast which won’t be removed until 
July 31 BACK IN ROMULUS and bearing greetings from 
the Louis Balints are Mr. and Mrs. Steven P. Hamerink of 
Hannan Road The Balints, formerly of Belleville, were their 
hosts during a recent visit to Harbor Heights, Florida where 
the Balints are in the process of building a new luxurious 
home. 


Marriage licenses 


Joseph A. Henderson, 43, 
9687 Jackson, Belleville, to 
Barbara Leblons, 45, 39500 
Warren. Plymouth. 

John F Peters, 22, 21128 
Middlebelt, New Boston, to 
Karen Asiala, 21, 519 E. 
Division, Cadillac. 

^ Douglas W. Middlton, 20, 
7612 Amboy, Dearborn 
Heights, to Nancy Flotte, 20, 
17040 Renton, Belleville. 

Richard A Wilkie, 22, 522 
Westland Rustic Lane, 
Belleville, to Brenda Cook, 18, 
522 Rustic Lane. Belleville. 

Ronald A. Publiski, 21, 51316 
Willis, Belleville, to Amy 

Kerr-Brooks 
engagement 
is announced 

The engagement of their 
daughter, Joyce, to Wesley L. 
Brooks is announced by Mr. 
and Mrs James W Kerr of 
9484 Terry Drive, Romulus. 

Miss Kerr was graduated 
from Romulus High School in 
1970 and is presently em- 
ployed at Metro Airport. 

Her fiance, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Francis Brooks of 6190 
Cordell, Romulus, resides at 
12916 Heritage Drive, 
Plymouth A 1969 Romulus 
High School graduate, he is 
employed at Nick’s Per- 
sonalized Service, Belleville. 

An August 5 wedding date at 
St Aloysius Catholic Church 
has been set. 


Carpenter, 18, 10001 Clayton, 
Belleville. 

Harold A. Skeels, 20. 37149 
Grant. Romulus, to Nancy 
Welch, 20, 37626 Walnut, 
Romulus. 

Elbert S. Maynard. 21, 26506 
Sibley, Romulus, to Sharon 
Maples. 17, 347 Fairwood Dr., 
Inkster. 

Dennis C. Martin, 24 . 6752 S 
Merriman, Romulus, to 
Loretto Celibraise, 20, 11172 
Hannan, Belleville. 

Richard A. Wolf, 38. 51000 
Mott Rd., Belleville, to 
Pamela Wetherington, 27, 
22101 Gratiot, Detroit. 

Bennie Crawford, 26, 11231 
Wahrman, Romulus, to 
Barbara Hester. 19, 35875 
Bibbins, Romulus. 

Marvin G. Halcomb. Jr., 19, 
15275 El well, Belleville, to 
Kathleen Martin, 18, 20050 
Karr, Belleville. 

Arnold E. Cooper. 20, 28690 
Reida, Trenton, to Barbara 

Summers. 18. 26242 Frankfort, 
New- Boston 

John L. Coppock, 22, 47032 
Lauren Ct., Belleville, to Jill 
Rut ley, 17. 8541 Belleville, 
Belleville. 

Ronald T. Martin, 25, Route 
5, Tazewell, Tenn., to Pamela 
Friar, 19, 49980 W. Huron 
River Dr., Belleville. 

Donald R. Brisley, 26, 5973 
Panam, fcomulus," to Carol 
Daniels, 26, 2617 Wendell, 
Detroit. 


Hoags will mark 
55th anniversary 


Mr and Mrs Frank Hoag of 
149 Liberty Street. Belleville, 
will hold an open house 
Sunday. July 9, in honor of 
their 55th wedding an- 
niversary The three to five 
event will lake place in the 
couple’s flower garden. The 
Hoags request that there be no 
gifts, please 

Residents of the Belleville 
area their entire married 
lives, the Hoags were married 
July 7, 1917, at the home of her 
parents, the Robert Laws, # on 
what is now known as 
Haggerty Road It was during 
World War I that they spoke 
their vows which have 
resulted in 55 years of 
togetherness. 

Bom to their union were six 
children. Mrs. Helen Wilson of 


Wilson. New York , Edith, who 
is deceased. Robert of Boise, 
Idaho, Raul of Ann Arbor; 
Donald of Jackson, and Mrs. 
Esther Saunders of Belleville 
There are also 16 grand- 
children and four great- 
grandchildren included on 
their family tree 
Mr Hoag, who is retired 
from the Ford Motor Com- 
pany after 34 years as an 
electrician at the Rouge and 
Bomber Plants, now fills his 
time by working in his 
beautiful flower garden. His 
wife is active in the Belleville 
MOMS of America, the Van 
B'uren Garden Club, and the 
Seventh Day Adventist 
Church on Liberty Street. 

The Hoags have resided at 
their present address for 49 
vears. 


Nehez-Jaszcz vows 
set for September 1 

During a birthday dinner June 19 for their daughter 
Barbara Lorraine, Mr. and Mrs. N. J. Nehez of 16650 Savage 
Road. Belleville, announced her engagement to Victor Lee 
Jaszcz. 

The bride-elect, who is planning a September 1 wedding 
was graduated in 1968 from Belleville High School and this 
past April from Eastern Michigan University where she was 
an art education major. She is now employed in the art 
department of E.M.U. 

The prospective bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs 
Stanley Jaszcz of 47253 Lauren Court, Belleville. A 1968 
alumnus of Belleville High, he graduated from Washtenaw 
Community College in 1971 and is now employed at Draw- 
Tite, Hoover Ball Bearing Company, Belleville. 

St. Anthony’s Catholic Church is being reserved for the 
couple’s wedding. 


Getting married? 
Tell us about it 


Want to share that ‘special day’ with those who are 
unable to be present, in person, for your wedding 
ceremony? We’ll WTite the details of your wedding in 
story form for you — and at no charge — if you’ll 
simply follow & few guidelines. 

The Belleville Enterprise and Romulus Roman offer 
bridal questionnaires for you to fill out as well as 
engagement forms for announcing the ‘start of it all.’ 

Forms may be picked up at our office. 405 Main- 
Street. (we’re in the old Township Hall now) anvtime 
during the week or will be mailed out if a telephone 
request is made. Call the Women’s Editor at 697-9191. 


Belleville girl student teaches 


A total of 636 Western 
Michigan University senior 
education majors are com- 
pleting their directed teaching 
assignments in various 
Michigan high schools. 


Among the seniors is Shelley 
Lynne Rogers of 20749 Mar- 
tinsville Rd., Belleville, who is 
leaching secondary education 
at the Best Junior High School 
in Dearborn Heights. 


g~rrrvi i mm a i nrri i a gim rm ir mTr 

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complete line of 
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i iV i W 'SVa*. Nr J 

A THOUGHT TO REMEMBER § 


BY HAROLD REDISKE. DIRECTOR 


Independence is a day by day privilege that must be earned. It 
is not a concession we can take for granted. Lets not forget this Is 
an historical significance of July 4th. 

In our American way of life, we have more privileges than 
any people on earth. We are privileged to worship God where and 
when we wish ... privileged to work where we choose ... 
privileged to educate ourselves to any degree we wish ... 
privileged to qualify for better fobs ... privileged to seek and earn 
better living conditions... privileged to travel where and when we 
wish privileged to express our thoughts, to agree or disagree 
with our fellow men. 

The prelude to our privileged life dates back to 10 years before 
the American Revolution when Patrick Henry shouted his im- 
mortal words, "Give me liberty or give me death". And ever 
since, our privileges have been bought and blessed with the blood 
and sacrifice of valiant men. As heirs of our heroic dead, would it 
not be fitting and proper for all of us to bend our knees and fold 
our hands on July 4th — and give thanks to God for the privilege 
of being an American? ... 

UHT MEMORIAL 
FUNERAL HOME 

35400 GLENWOOD AVENUE 
WESTLAND <>A 1-8555 


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Center of Belleville 





A PANAX PUBLICATION- 


Wed nesday, July 5, 1972 


Democratic national post 
is out — Mrs. Chapman 


•sv-y 

* 


fyicjeAt 


A weekly tour of leading Shops 
and Services. For Information 
Regarding this Cdumn.Call 477 6588. 
by 

\ Diane Martina . 

• BE A PLAYGIRL.. this Writer can personally guarantee that 
once you "try it. you'll LOVE it!" Has that 1st shock wave sub- 
sided. yet? The one you got vtfien you tried on last years bathing 
suit, or when you ventured out in it, and saw vAiafrhe others look 
like? Even if you've lost weight. .have you lost inches; tightened 
up in the right places? When he smiles. .do the candles light up in 
his eyes? THEY WILL . if you're a real "Playgirl". a graduate of 
the fabulous new PLAYGIRL FIGURE SALONS! If you're a 
plump and comfy size 14 you can be a swinging size 10 in 30 days! 
You'll feel 100 lbs. lighter, and look a million times prettier! NO 
sags and bulges left over. Gals. And not in your pocketbook, 
either! This entire program costs so little, it's less than the cost of 
a package of Cigarettes per day! And you'll enjoy unlimited 
visits.. NO interest.. NO "carrying charges". .NO strict diet 
regimen, as you correct your individual figure problems, and 
pounds literally melt away! Let their expert Consultants tell you 
about it, while there's still room in the program! Michigan's two 
new Salons (four more to follow quickly!) are in the Telford 
Shopping Center, corner of Ford & Telegraph, In Dearborn 
Heights, and in the Drakeshire Shopping Center, corner of Drake 
& Grand River, in Farmington. The Telford Salon is open 
TODAY . .THE Farmington Salon will be open JULY 16th. And 
because it's THE Best thing for YOU, we told you about it first ! 

• DOES AN AMBASSADOR REALLY follow Playglrls? The one 

in Shoppers' Digest does, because the Ladies who want to look 
their best usually see to it that they are surrounded by lovely 
things, too. "Beauty is as beauty does" say the Wise. .and what 
Beauty does, is to live a happy, comfortable life with the elegant 
little Gift always at hand.. the perfect Boutique on her Dressing 
Table.. a fresh, bright Flower Arrangement for her centerpiece, 
and something just a bit "extra" to light this total portrait..® 
softly scented, artistically styled Candle, perhaps a ONE-only 
choice from T-W-0 ROOMS just full of ornate wickery. So the 
total Woman knows unerringly that wickery-and witchery-and 
feminity. .and "The Ambassador" are all a part of "the whole 
thing"! Therefore, we would naturally have the AMBASSADOR 
FLOWER & GIFT SHOP (7342 Middlebett, |ust N. of Warren, in 
Westland) follow our Playgirl. .story! But the Ambassador story 
itself is so full of the unusual.. that we would rather invite you to 
visit for yourself! That "something else" you keep hearing 
about. .is the Gift you'll find there! 

•WE SAID WE'D mention DANNY'S FOODS again..and there's 
SO much to say, all of it sincerely good, that we SHOULD say it 
again! The fact that their competitors now imitate their 24-hour 
service still does N-O-T put them in the same category by a long 
shot! There is no way, for instance, that they have matched their 
prices. .and, when all is said and done, price isVERY Important! 
USDA Choice Meats cost less at Danny's than lesser grades do at 
large Chain Operations. We bought Banquet Frozen Dinners 
there last week for «/ 4 less than Chain Store prices! And large 
bags of Potato Chips for 1-3 less. This is a sizeable savings, but 
when this week— a Holiday Week, no less, promises something 
like Sealtest Ice Cream at 33 cents per Vj gallon, you know they 
meanS-a-v-i-n-g-s! Open Pit BBQ Sauce, the Giant Size, sells for 
one small nickle more than the small bottle in other Super- 
markets. We could go on.. but we're just a few stories away 
from heading for Danny's right now . and hoping to meet YOU 
there! Tonight we're going toDANN Y'S FOODS at 25633 Warren, 

E. of BeedvDaly, in Dearborn Heights. Other times, we stop at 
3031 S. Telegraph, in Dearborn. .or 30221 Cherry Hill, at Henry 
Ruff. And we go whenever we please .don't you?? 

• HEY, HOW ABOUT something really "Different"? Like a 
Hawaaian Family Room with a "Grass" floor?? The kind you 
vacuum - or wipe up with a sponge or put a potted Palm smack 
in the middle of? And this Grass CARPETING is so "real", 
people areusing it for lawns instead of laying Sod! I Why not?? 
It's mildew proof.. comes in shades from Kentucky -bluegrass- 
perfect to a natural touch of brovw here 'n there! Different 
enough? Well, that's the barest example of what you'll find at 
OLD TOWN FLOOR COVERING, where there's something 
newer and BIGGER in Floor Fashions every time we visit! 
LIKE: N-E-O-N colored Fluorescent Carpets!! Poster like, they 
glow when exposed to black light; add zesty colors to room set- 
tings in ALL lights! Of 100 per cent Nylon Face Fiber with soft 
foam rU)ber cushioned back, they're in tremendous demand for 
Dens, Recreation Rooms, Mod Bedrooms and a variety of places 
only Y O U can put them! These particular ones are available in 
various Rug sizes, or In 12 ft. rolls, of course. They fill Jay 
Newell's personal code, too: Durable. Decorative. Distinctive. 
There just couldn't be MORE to offer a person who wants the 
best. .especially when they're Shoppers' Digest Reeders who 
KNOW the best costs even less, at OLD TOWN FLOOR 
COVERING, 192 W. Liberty, in Plymouth. 

• A NUMBER OF YOUNG Families starting out in life.. perhaps 
within the 1st few years of their Marriage, are showing up in the 
"Vacation at home" census figures, which shouldn't be sur- 
prising for plural reasons! First, there's the vacation-accident 
rate. Another very important reason of course, is SS»! That 
vacation pay finds Its way into the home. In the shape of 
something that will make the family happy for years to come. 
When this means Furniture, it should mean NATIONAL UN- 
CLAIMED FURNITURE SHOWROOMS. (One is at 29855 Ford. 
Rd., in Garden City; others are in Clawson and Port Huron). In 
our own Family, we've discovered that National offers not only 
substantial savings.. but they offer it on Qualify Furniture, with 
THREE Delivery 8i Service plans, to help you save even more! 

So if this year's 4th of July trip turns out to be a trip on Sunday 
afternoon from 12-6, or Weekdays til 9 p.m., to National Un- 
claimed Furniture Showrooms . you may find yourself safe at 
home . with your "Vacation Benefits" converted into years of 
pleasure! And if you ARE going away. .the folks at National say 
"Have fun. .come back soon. .and visit us any time!" 

•MANY VACATIONERS ARE leaving now, of oourse. Here 
again, stay at-homers find extra advantages, since Families 
planning vacations now have registered youngsters for Mary Ann 
Anderson's Craft Classes at a later Summer date. This gives 
others a chance to take available space NOW, In the Classes 
which are causing such a stir that youngsters come from other 
Cities to learn, and to experience the pride and growth that are a 
part of creative accomplishment! TWO MOMS were so im- 
pressed with what their youngsters were doing at Mary Arm's 
last week, that THEY REGISTERED, along with the small fry! 
One six year old has produced a Cup in Ceramics Class, and quite 
unexpectedly, which clearly bespeaks the future that might 
never have been realized if Mom hadn't cared enough to get him 
into a Class! These Craft Classes have NO Instruction Charge, by 
the way. and there are still a FEW openings, as follows: 
Ceramics 10 a.m. & 1 p.m.,; Candle Making 11 p.m., only; 
Beading 2 p.m., only. Other Classes are filled to capacity at the 
present time. So, IF you would like to encourage your youngster 
in the making of useful and beautiful things Don't wait call 
ANDERSON CRAFTS at 455-7575 or 455-4792, in Plymouth, 
NOW!! 

• AND IF YOU'RE In Plymouth today -you'll have a preview of 
some GREAT Mid Summer Clearance Specials at Ml NERVA'S- 
DUNNINGS, 500 Forest, just off Ann Arbor Rd. Minerva's being 
THE Womens & Childrens Shop for the name brand apparel you 
see in fine Magazines, and being a Fashion Leader, you KNOW 
you're going to make some excellent savings on some very lovely 
things. The variety of merchandise throughout the Shop includes 
Clothes for all seasons, in almost every size, style and color you 
might want! You'll find a selection of Lingerie, Dresses, 
Playclothes, even seasonal Toppers. Minerva's mid-summer 
Clearance always signals the start of our (would you believe..) 
Christmas Shopping! Well, why not? The things we want to 
give and some of those we hoped we'd receive, are there at Sale 
Prices and one frequently realizes enough of a Savings to choose 
a personal Gift, besides! So you treat your Budget . your 
Friends and YOURSELF, on a pleasant Afternoon in the place 
where the nicest things are always found: Minerva's Dunnings! 
And prices on things you'll wear into September. . are going down 
from this week, oh! 

• HAPPY CONFUSION is NEVER a bother, so Please don't 
apologize for it ! It's our pleasure and our privilege to hear from 
Readers, and we're really asking for it when we have a Contest! 
For just a few of the Altes, Grape Malt Duck, and Apple Malt 
IXck fans who misplaced our address and were nice enough to 
call for it. and for anyone else who might have the last minute 
Recipe that wins our "Brew Something Up" Contest and makes 
them the Guest of Columnist Cap Patric at our "Winner Dinner", 
at any one of his favorite Restaurants (You read about allot them 
in Cap's "Scene About Town" Column, and about our Cooking 
Contest, too), let us do a repeat Send your Recipes, those that 
you have adapted to use with ALTES BEER, GRAPE MALT 
DUCK or APPLE MALT DUCK, to SHOPPERS' DIGEST, P O 
80X2482, LIVONIA (48151) Right now. Apple-Malty-Cookies are 
the favorite at our house, but YOU might just have something 
better It you DO, for Heaven's sake, send it along. Now, don't 
lose the address again . . because we're waiting! 


Mrs Josephine Chapman, of 
259 E Huron River Dr.. 
Belleville, a George Wallace 
leader and vice chairman of 
the Michigan national con- 
vention delegation, says she’s 
not interested in being 
national committeewoman. 

"I’m nut going to consider 
being national com- 
mitteewoman.” she said. 

The Michigan delegation 
will select a national com- 
mitteeman and com- 
mitteewoman at the con- 
vention in Miami next month 

Mrs Chapman, mother of 
three boys, took issue with 
reports that she and James 
McNeely, state Democratic 
chairman, had agreed she 
would support him as 
delegation chairman in return 
for his support on the com- 
mitteewoman vote. 

“We made no agreement,” 
she said. 

A telegram from Wallace 
had proposed that Mrs. 
Chapman be named national 
committeewoman for 
Michigan and Arthur Cullers 
of Battle Creek be named 
delegation chairman. 

Girl to go 
to summer 
camp 

Miss Brenda Lohr, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Lohr 
Jr., of 49170 Bemis Rd., 
Belleville, has been accepted 
for the Central Michigan 
University’s High School 
Music Camp 

The annual high school 
music camp is held June 18 — 
July 1 at the university. 

The two-week intensive 
study program is open to 
talented high school vocalists 
and instrumentalists who 
have been recommended by 
their local school instructors. 

Bellevile coed 
on dean’s list 

Miss Joyce Juanita Perdue, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Carlos Perdue of 4205 Ex- 
pressway, Belleville, was 
among 42 students from 
Michigan included in the 049 
students listed on the dean’s 
list of Bob Jones University in 
Greenville, S.C. , 

The students listed on the 
Dean’s list earned at least a B 
average during the second 
semester. Bob Jones is a 
liberal arts coeducational 
Christian institution. 



For your recipe file 


WHAT A DESSERT!— That all-American 
favorite, ice cream, is the star of this easy-to- 
make dessert, Crispy Ice Cream Pie. The 
crust and lopping feature crisp rice cereal 


which adds just the right amount of crun- 
chiness to contrast with the ice cream. A 
great way to give a party personality to a 
simple dessert. (Courtesy of Post Pebbles.) 


Ice cream pie 
for all seasons 


Ice cream is one of the most popular of desserts and a year- 
round favorite with almost everyone. Fortunately for ice 
cream lovers, we’ve come a long way since Dolly Madison 
served “frozen pudding” at a formal White House dinner 
over 150 years ago. Soon afterward the popularity of ice 
cream spread throughout the land. Sundaes, sodas, and 
cones became part of the American scene. 

In recent years pies have been added to the ice cream 
repertoire. They’re a grand way to make a special dessert of 
ice cream and yet are easy to prepare. Especially easy 
Crispy Ice Cream Pie which features crisp rice cereal as 
crust and topping. Vanilla ice cream has a great affinity for 
crisp rice cereal — fruity flavor, and coffee ice cream goes 
especially well with cocoa flavor. The result is a tasty 
crunchy-smooth treat. 

Another delectable use of crisp rice cereal is in an Out-Of- 
Hand Snack where it’s combined with peanuts (or other nuts) 
and raisens for a tasty snack time munch. 

Crispy Ice Cream Pie 

2 cups crisp rice cereal— cocoa or fruity flavor 
2 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted 
1 quart vanilla ice cream 

Combine cereal and butter; toss lightly to coat. Set aside ^ 
cup. Press remaining cereal evenly into a well-buttered 8- 
inch pie pan. Chill about 1 hour. Fill with ice cream. Sprinkle 
with reserved cereal. Freeze. For ease in serving, dip pie pan 
just to rim in warm water for a few seconds; then cut and 
serve. Makes 6 to 8 servings. 


Out-Of -Hand Snack 

1 cup crisp rice cereal— cocoa or fruity flavor 
cup peanuts or other nuts 
V 4 cup raisens 

Combine cereal, peanuts, and raisens in bowl; mix well. 
Serve as a snack. Makes 1*6 cups. 


Let’s clean 
our parks 

City children with no place 
to go and nothing to do are 
getting help from concerned 
citizens who are turning 
debris-filled vacant lots into 
“vest pocket” parks. To be 
successful these mini-parks 
must be planned by the whole 
community. One of the main 
problems is keeping new (and 
old) parks clean. The Pepsi- 
Cola Company urges everyone 
to support the “Protect Our 
Parks” program: Leave your 
park cleaner than when you 
found it. Your neighbors may 
get the idea! 

Cotton is the only major 
fibqr that increases in 
strength when it’s wet. 



Amy Vanderbilt’s etiquette 

Her compliments 
should be sincere 


By AMY VANDERBILT 


A girl 
can dream, 
can’t she? 



"Dear Miss Vanderbilt: 
What is one to do when with 
women who expect to be 
complimented on their 
clothes? I find myself ill at 
ease with them, not knowing 
what to say. One woman 
mentioned to a friend that she 
knew I didn’t care for her 
dress as I had made no 
mention of it. What would be 
in .good taste and let me 
remain honest? — Mrs. D.N.” 

I. too, believe in being 
honest in these matters. As 
you know that certain women 
do expect to be complimented, 
on their clothes, say whatever 
complimentary thing you can 
say without lying For 
3xample, “What a pretty 
color,” “That’s very new, isn’t 
it?” Most women accept such 
comments as compliments. If 
you are asked the direct 
question, “Do you like my 
dress?” and you definitely do 
not, remember if you say so 
you will cause unhappiness 
and perhaps lose a friend. Say 


whatever good you can of it, 
perhaps commenting on the 
workmanship, the fabric, the 
cut. After all, your eye may 
not be used to a new line or 
color if the dress is avant- 
garde. In a few months it may 
look all right to you as well. 
Think about the fashion 
changes you came to accept in 
time. 

"Dear Miss Vanderbilt: 
What do you do about late 
dinner guests^ and those who 
come early? — Mrs. G.V.” 

Unless such guests are 
guests of honor, you do not 
wait more than say 15 minutes 
beyond the time when dinner 
was to be served. The late 
arrivals seat themselves 
promptly without long ex- 
planations. The hostess does 
not rise and the only man 
aside from the host rising is 
the gentleman to the right of 
the late-coming woman to be 
seated.” 


This time you’re absolutely going to save 
something out of your paycheck. But, then, 
you really do need that pantsuit, a new coat 
and, of course, that perfume Eric likes so 
much. 

Before you know it, the money’s gone . . . 
and all you’ve got saved are your dreams. 

That’s why the Payroll Savings Plan is 
such a good idea for a single girl. When you 
join, an amount you specify is set aside 
from your check and used to buy U.S. Sav- 
ings Bonds. And, it’s all done before you 
get your check— so you can’t help but save. 

And then you’ll find those Bonds a solid 
investment for the future, if your dream 
man ever gets serious. 

And if he doesn’t — well, at least you’ll 
have a little travel fund stashed away. Who 
knows who you might meet on that wonder- 
ful cruise? 

Either way, U.S. Savings Bonds can help 
a girl keep dreaming . . . and every girl needs 
to dream. 


ST. PAUL'S 
EV. LUTHERAN 
CHURCH 

494 Columbia Ave. 

Belleville, Mi. 

Rev. W.L. Henning 

697-8732 or 697-9292 

Worship - 8:00 and 10:30 a.m. 
S. School at 9:15 


LUTHERAN CHURCH 
OF THE 
APOSTLES 

MEETING PLACE 

V.F.W. MEMORIAL HALL 
44170 BEMIS ROAD 

WORSHIP-SUNOAY 9 30 AM 
Sunday School 11 a. m. 

Harold E. Koch, Pastor 
Parsonage: 45190 Jeannette 

Phone: 699-2111 


Every guest has a night- 
mare that he will be first. 
Guests who come too early 
usually do feel embarrassed 
as do hosts who are frequently 
not ready. When this happens, 
the only thing to do is to pass it 
off with good humor and go 
about whatever preparations 
still need to be completed. If 
necessary, seat the guests in 
the living room or elsewhere 
and say that others will be 
along very shortly. If possible, 
have some member of the 
family see that they get 
refreshments. 

“Dear Miss Vanderbilt: Is 
there any courteous way to 
quiet drunken or otherwise 
unruly guests ir. your home? - 
Mrs. C.E.” 

Such guests are not 
necessarily men these days. If 
it is a man, the host or some 
man acting as host, should 
lake him aside and tell him 
that his behavior is not ac- 
ceptable. Sometimes he must 
be told tactfully or if 
necessary, very firmly, that 
he should go home When a 
woman is in this condition, the 
hostess has the responsibility 
to do something about it, so 


Hospital 

Briefs 

BEYER HOSPITAL 


MEDICAL — William 
Jennings, 21255 Wilmot Rd., 
Belleville; Mrs. Louis A. 
Lucier, 9805 Van Buren, 
Belleville; Mrs. Bernard Wall, 
660 Greylock, Belleville. 

SURGICAL — Craig 
Banotai, 4, son of the Marvin 
Banotais, 17700 Martinsville 
Rd.. Belleville; Mrs. Lloyd 
Layne, 48662 Sully Dr., 
Belleville; Clinton Bogle, 5 
mos., son of the James Bogles, 
11, 17941 Sumpter Rd., 

Belleville; Mrs. Leroy 
Morrell, 20367 Sherwood Rd., 
Belleville; Mrs. Charles 
Varney, 45171 Judd Rd., 
Belleville; Michael D. Esch, 
8525 Moms Dr., Belleville; 
John C. Moriarty, 153 Potfer 
Dr., Belleville; Mrs. John L. 
Oyer, 374 Rustic Lane, 
Belleville. 

BELVIL COMMUNITY 
HOSPITAL 

MEDICAL — George 
Bacome, 46507 Bemis Rd., 
Belleville; Kyle Freeman, 
8677 Nottingham, Ypsilanti; 
Tammy Bates, 11 mos., 
daughter of the Alvin Bateses, 
31433 Alcona, Westland; Hollie 
Keeran, 6810 Orchard, 


that other guests are not made Dearborn; Ralph Swain, 4209 



Nrn* t- May V < r i ifchon firlrl t-i 

maturity >>l ft years, 10 ntunths 4 , (hr hr*i 
year kind* .ire replaciil if \U*li-n *.i 
ri v»<l Whin nmlnl lhi-v can I* 
at vinir KiiiL Inlrrrtl i* nut tubyil In .tali' 
•if I14.1I i m ’Hint- lakes and f4-4J1-r.il la* mas 
la «M» i 1 1.1 ulilll f idemnt lun 


^ ^ % 

* * 


Take stock in America. 

Now Bonds mature in less than six years. 


A NEW FUTURE 



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uncomfortable. She might 
say, “Sally, you’ve had a little 
bit too much to drink. May I 
see that someone gets you 
home safely (or “would you 
like to lie down for a bit”). Do 
not serve any more liquor to 
such a person and tell him 
why. If all else fails, close the 
bar and quietly explain to the 
other quests that this par- 
ticular problem is too much 
for you. (If there is no way at 
the moment to get the ob- 
jectionable guest out of the 
house). 

(For Amy Vanderbilt’s 
booklet, “Large Parties,” 
send your name and address, 
plus 75 cents in coin, to: Miss 
Amy Vanderbilt, (The Daily 
Eagle), P.O. Box 1066, 
Weston, Con. 06880, requesting 
the booklet by name.) 


Cover doors 

Hide an off-center, seldom- 
used door by covering the wall 
with wood paneling. 


Vassar, Dearborn; Myrtle 
Burchfield, 7320 Rosemont, 
Detroit; Rita Sobolewski, 340 
Woodlawn, Ypsilanti; Hillary 
Yates, 1321 Desota, Ypsilanti; 
Albert Story, 25837 Colgate, 
Inkster; Michael Bush, 2023 
Medford, Ann Arbor; Jason 
Gibbs, 7 mos., son of the 
Edward Gibbses, 39264 Bru 
Nottingham, Detroit; Paul 
Hunt, 35646 Brush St., Wayne; 
Celdar Wheelock, 426 
Washington, Ypsilanti. 

SURGICAL — Helen 
O’Connell, 28408 Bredow Rd., 
Romulus; Karen Aycock, 5, 
daughter of the William 
Aycocks, 5012 Niagara, 
Wayne; Beulah Hall, 5107 
Harrison, Wayne; Betty 
Milspaugh, 8. daughter of the 
Robert Milspaughs, 33701 
Beechwood. Westland; 
Stanley Gilbert, 2898 Carlton, 
Ann Arbor; Jack Hamilton, 
824 Prospect, Ypsilanti; 
Henry Ray, 2067 Champagne, 
Ann Arbor; Sadie 
Rosebrough, 1725 W. Chicago, 
Detroit, Taz Youngblood, 2135 
Woodale. Ypsilanti: 



WANZA’S 

Introduces . . . . 

Mr. Marcos 

of Mexico City 


Specializing in 
Application of 


Permanent Individual Lashes 

That Stay on Day & Night 

High Styling Make Up For Weddings. Etc. By Appointment 

WANZA’S BEAUTY SALON 

3809 INKSTER RD. INKSTER 


274-5415 



Wednesday. July 5. 1972 

Pfeiffer-Sobecki wed 


A PANAX PUBLICATION 


Central Michigan students 
married at St. Anthony’s 


In a double ring ceremony June 3 at St. Anthony's Catholic 
Church. Cynthia Sobecki of Belleville became the bride of 
Joseph Pfeiffer of Pontiac. The Rev. Raymond Skoney 
presided at the five o’clock nuptial rite before an altar ap- 
pointed with vases of yellow and white mums. 

The bride’s counsin, Pam Bies, was at the organ to play 
traditional wedding selections 

Parents of the young couple are Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Sobecki of 45065 Bemis Road, Belleville, and Mrc Sophia 
Pfeiffer of 1 18 Rea, Pontiac. 

ESCORTED TO the sanctuary by her father, Cindy ap- 
peared in a toe-touching creation of chiffon with the long, full 
sleeves cuffed in lace. The lace motif was also used on the 
high stand-up collar and again as appliques on the A-line 
skirt. 



Her floor-length Mantilla 
veil, bordered in lace, was 
caught to a small lace pillbox. 
Completing her ensemble was 
a cascade bouquet of white 
carnations, miniature pink 
roses and stephanotis. 

The bride’s best friend, 
Sharon Volgyes of Belleville, 
was asked to be maid of honor. 
Her blue and white print 
polyester frock was designed 
with a blue satin midriff and 
bow- and the white daisies she 
wore in her hair were secured 
by a matching bow\ Her 
bouquet was comprised of 
white roses and blue tinted 
carnations. 

Bridesmaids were Rita 
Turner, the bride’s sister from 
Louisville. Kentucky, who 
wore an identical ensemble in 
green and white; Dianne 
Gonczy of Ypsilanti, in lilac 
and white; and Debra Chapa, 
of Pontiac in yellow' and white. 
Each wore a matching 
headpiece and carried white 
roses and carnations to match 
their dresses. 


NINE-YEAR OLD Debra 
Moncrieff, daughter of Mrs. 
Rosalie Moncrieff, wore a 
dress to match that of the 
honor attendant. Her 


miniature cascading bouquet 
contained blue carnations and 
white roses 

Best man was Tom Barnes 
of Pontiac, the bridegroom s 
best friend. Others on the 
esquire side were Frank 
Sobecki, Jr., brother of the 
bride; Bob Gonczy of Yp- 
silanti; and Richard Chapa of 
Pontiac. 

At the reception, which 
followed in the P.N.A. Hall, 
the bride’s mother greeted the 
200 guests in a floor-length 
gown of mint green polyester 
crepe trimmed in white lace. 
Her corsage was comprised of 
green carnations. Mrs. 
Pfeiffer chose for her son’s 
wedding a beige satin formal 
gown to which she added her 
corsage of pink carnations. 

The newly w'eds have both 
been attending Central 
Michigan University at Mount 
Pleasant for the past three 
years Cindy, who is a medical 
technician major, is com- 
pleting a year of training at 
William Beaumont Hospital in 
Royal Oak. Her husband, a 
chemistry major, will begin 
his senior year in the fall. 

Prior to the wedding, the 
bride’s parents entertained at 
a rehearsal dinner at their 
home on Bemis Road 



INSTALLATION HELD — The Mothers 
( luh of SI. Antlioiiv's parish held installation 
of officers for I he 1972-73 school year. A 
candlelight ceremony June 12 put the 
following women into office: (from left) Mrs. 
Sharon Collins, treasurer; Mrs. Janet 


Roflmwiak. publicity chairman; Mrs. Carol 
llard>. \ ice-president ; Mrs. Sally Bowles, 
president; and Mrs. Barbara Yilleneuve. 
secretary. The Rev. Raymond Skoney, 
church pastor, (right) was installing 
chaplain. 


For and about 

Suburban Women 


Belleville Brevities 


Artley family reunion held in Litchfield, O. 


MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH PFEIFFER 


Bn MRS. ORRIN POST 
OX 7-7431 

Sixty one members of the 
Artley family and nine guests 
held their family reunion at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Glenn Cullin at Litchfield, 
Ohio on Saturday June 24. 

Those attending from this 
area were, Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur Cullin of Sumpter Rd , 
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Cullin of 
Ayres St., Mrs. Cora Brad- 
shaw of Bedell St v Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Weber of Beck 
Rd., Miss Mildred Artley of W. 
Columbia Ave.. and Mrs. 
Marie Clayton of High St. 

Rc\ . and Mrs. Robert 
McQuaid and sons of Port 
Huron spent Monday night 
, and Tuesday w'ith his parents 
the Howard McQuaids of 
Second St. 

\huul sixty members of the 
Woods family held a family 


Over the summer 


Children must keep 
in touch with words 


Don’t let your child close his 
mind now that the school 
doors have closed for the 
summer, recommend two 
Michigan State University 
educators. 

Dr. Donald E. Hamacheck, 
professor of counseling, 
personnel services and 
educational psychology at 
MSU, emphasizes that it is 
essential for children “to keep 
in touch with words.” 

This can easily be done, he 
explains, by taking the child to 
the library and letting him 
pick out his own books. 

If children do not keep in 


touch with words they do lose 
the skills they learned in 
school, reports Dr. William 
Walsh, professor of 
elementary and special 
education. 

II** explains that the 
average child graduating 
from the fourth grade 
probably reads at a slightly 
higher level than that grade 
(4.5). When he returns to 
school in the fall, however, he 
will probably read at the 3.5 
level . 

Both professors explain that 
summer school is valuable but 
summer is an important time 


r « ■ M N * )( 

The Book Nook | 


for children to grow' outside 
the routine, formalized 
system 

It is encouraging, Dr. Walsh 
says, that summer school is no 
longer only remedial in 
nature. In the past, only the 
slow learners went to summer 
school in order to pick up the 
skills necessary to pass on to 
the next grade in the fall. 

“Now there is a renewed 
interest in summer school and 
it is far more socially ac- 
ceptable. 

Enrichment programs, such 
as arts and crafts classes, 
swimming lessons, band and 
typing, are blossoming in 
school districts throughout the 
country These are ideal for 
broadening the child’s 
education, they conclude. 


reunion at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs Don Rank in Plymouth 
on Sunday June 25. Those 
attending from Belleville were 
Mrs. LeVern Sayre of Ecorse 
Rd., the James Sayre family 
of Morton-Taylor Rd and 
Mrs Althea Amerman of E. 
Columbia Ave. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Deering 
spent the Fourth of July with 
their daughter and son-in-law 
and family, the Otto Lin- 
demanns in Buffalo. Mrs. 
Lindemann is the former 
Carol Deering. 

Mi. and Mrs. Arthur Cullin 
of Sumpter Rd. accompanied 
Mr and Mrs. Gerald Cullin to 
Litchfield. Ohio w-here they 
were the guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Glenn Cullin for several 
days. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy V. Keys of 
Punta Gorda, Florida called 
on several old friends here on 
Tuesday. The Keyses were 
former Belleville residents for 
many years, living on 
Belleville Rd 

Mrs. Harold Leschinske 
spent several days in 
Lakewood, 0. visiting our 
former librarian, Miss Helena 
McCullough. 

Mrs. Adger A Wall of E. 
Huron River Dr. received 
word last week of the death of 
her aunt, Mrs. William 
Godson of Bonita Springs, Fla. 
Mrs. Godson will be 
remembered here as Nina 


Women’s 

Page 

Deadline 

Thursday 

2 PM 


Cobb Miller She is survived 
by her husband Col Godson 
and a daughter. Mrs. Eola 
Farrell also of Bonita Springs, 
one granddaughter and her 
only brother Ray Cobb of Ft. 
Myers, Ha. Her first husband 
was Dr. Frank Miller of 
Liberty St. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
Clayton of Bedell St. and 
friends Mr. and Mrs. Sherman 
Mann of Wayne have returned 
from a nine day trip thru the 
New England states. 

Enroute home in Allentown 
Pa. they ran into the terrible 
floods and had to be evacuated 
from their motel. Due to the 
Pennsylvania Turnpike being 
closed they had to take a 
circuitous route to avoid the 
water. 

) 

Capt. and Mi's. Daniel F. 
Ross and daughter, Rachel, 
who have been visiting his 
parents, the Duane Rosses of 
Quirk Rd , left Tuesday for 
their home at Rollo, Mo. 

Mr. and Mrs. James 


College accepts 
Belleville girl 


Miss Sandra Seaman, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Emery Fred Seaman of 40952 
Tvler Rd., Belleville, has been 
accepted for admission to 
Evangel College for the fall 
semester. 

Sandra, a 1972 graduate of 
Belleville Senior High School, 
plans to major in physical 
education or psychology. 

Evangel College, located in 
Springfiled, Mo., is a national 
four-year college of arts and 
sciences of the Assemblies of 
God Church. 

For ideas on finding and 
financing a home where you 
can live the way you’d like, a 
12-page booklet is available 
for 15 cents in coin from 
Western Wood Products 
Assn., Dept. 525-P, Yeon 
Bldg., Portland. Or. 97204. 


Sutherland of Florida who are 
spending the summer with 
their children here were 
Wednesday morning callers 
on Mr. and Mrs. Russel) E. 
Harris of Robbe St. 

Russell who is confined to 
his home by illness is slowly 
gaining. 

Mi. and Mrs. Forrest 
Shirley of Wexford St. have 
returned home from a ten-day 
vacation in the eastern states. 
They visited Boston. Mt. 
Washington, New Hampshire 
and many other points of 
interest in the east 

Mis. Clyde Woods Ol 
Belleville Rd.. who recently 


underwent major surgery at 
F'ord Hospital, is on the gain 
and expects to return home 
soon. 

Richard Hamilton of E. 
Huron River Dr., who w-as so 
seriously ill earlier this 
spring, is slowly gaining at his 
home. 

I lie Junior Study Club has 
opened a “Hobby Center’’ 
called Girls’ place on Main St. 
near Roys St. for girls going 
into the eighth grade and up. It 
is open on Wednesdays and 
Saturdays from one to three 
o’clock This week the girls 
have been sewing and next 
week they will be making Wall 
Hangings. 


Page A-7 

Pre school 
youngsters 
graduate 

Sumpter Township’s Head 
Start Program held a 
graduation ceremony for its 
pre -school children * 

The recent graduation party 
was held at the Head Start 
Center, located at Mar 
tinsville and Judd Roads, 
Sumpter 

Mrs Lucille Toason, Head 
Start teacher, and Mrs. Lilian 
Bullard, also of the Head Start 
staff, supervised the 
graduation party. 

Beaudrie s Trucking Co. of 
Sumpter donated refresh- 
ments. including a huge cake 
for the pre-schoolers, who 
were presented with 
graduation diplomas at the 
party. 

The Head Start Center of- 
ficials wish to take this op- 
portunity to thank the 
Beaudrie Trucking Co. and the 
others who assisted in making 
the pre-school graduation 
party a reality. 

Girls take 

weekend 

camp-out 

Junior Girl Scout Troop 616, 
sponsored by the Mt. Pleasant 
Elementary School in 
Romulus, recently spent a 
w'eekend at Camp Linden in 
Linden. 

The girls went swimming, 
hiking and took part in service 
projects at the camp. 

The Girl Scout leaders on 
the weekend trip were Mrs. 
Joyce Minnaugh and Mrs. 
Helen Carroll. 

The members of the troop 
who participated were 
Suzanne Minnaugh, Sandy 
Minnaugh, Kathy Carroll*. 
Mickey Laginess, Marcy 
Laginess, Pam Brandow, 
April Hutchinson, Gail 
Blanchard, Dawn Collins. 
Janice Dubsky. Ruth Glazier, 
Kathy Nieman, Vicky 
Mayberry. Diana Kampsen. 
Gw'en Hryan and Sherry 
Gen aw. 

The Girl Scouts were later 
joined at camp by Mrs. Gail 
Blanchard and her three-year- 
old daughter, Christy; and 
Mrs. Jan Kampsen, who 
brought watermelons for the 
girls. 


Donna Pfeiffer 
loves her Gas furnace. 


ROMULUS LIBRARY 
11121 Wavnc Rd. 


FICTION 

“Tin* Assassins" by Elia 
Kazan. Sgt. Cesario Flores, an 
Air Force maintenance chief 
stationed in New Mexico, 
discovers that his teen-age 
daughter is involved with a 
group of spaced-out acid 
freaks. He lures the hippie 
leader to his house* and kills 
him. 

"II II ai row house" by 
Gerald A Browne. A small- 
time diamond dealer is en- 
ticed into becoming a key 
operative in a plot to steal a 
fortune in diamonds. 

"Monday the Rabbi Took 
Off” by Harry Kemelman 
Rabbi David Small decides to 
take a leave of absence and go 
to Jerusalem, where he 
becomes involved in an in- 


cident which includes Arab 
militants and terrorist 
bombings. 


BE I 


.LKVILLE LIBRARY 
167 Fourth St. 


FICTION 

"The Terminal Man" by 
Michael Crichton. Benson is a 
brilliant computer expert, 
subject fo fits of violence, and 
a surgical team proposes to 
connect his brain to a com- 
puter thal will regulate his 
behavior. 

"Bodies in Motion" by Zane 
Kotker. Sonya, who has 
married Victor, and has had 
two children, finds that Victor, 
who was delightful at first, has 
become an or ogre 

"A Sdcctful of People" by 
Winston M Estes Eight 
stories of small town Texas 
life with characters familiar 
to the typical small town. 




(6allerg* 

Custom Service by Jean & Betty 

240 MAIN ST. BELLEVILLE 


•Wallpaper •Furniture 

•Wall Decor • Lighting 
FREE DELIVERY 

Phone 697-8773 



Especial ly in su miner. 


Because she had a Gas air conditioner 
added to he I Gas furnace. \nd >o the same 
dependable ami economical blue flame that 
warms her home all winter now cools it all 
Mimnivr— UMiig the >amc blowers, ducts 
and registers. 

Now itN ,i total comfort stem that’s 
quiet. Jean and economical. In fact i Gas 
au-comlitioivr..! s\Mcm costs onl\ about 


half as much to operate as an electric system. 

So, it' you have a Gas furnace, you're 
already a long way toward a great year- 
round comfort system. 

Don’t wait. Call your local heating and 
cooling contractor or Michigan Consoli- 
dated Gas COmpany representative today. 

I le’ll show you how easy it is to lo\c >our 
Gas furnace . . . winter and summer. 


MICHIGAN CONSOLIDATED GAS COMPANY 

We care about your tomorrow. 




Page A-8 


A PANAX PUBLICATION 


PCHA approves 
hourly workers ’ 
18 -cent raise 


The Peoples 'immunity Hospital Authority 
1 PCHA/ last night gave its stamp of approval to a 
two year contract for hourly rated employes which will give 
them an across-the-b -rd hourly hike of 18 cents 
llio hoard also ippir.ved • \ uranec policy program 

for salaried employes, but not b**i !<e\ ' -t fleidmann, 
Wayne councilman, voiced sit objection > the formula 
under which he charged the new benefit was arrived. 

PCTIA representatives have lh.ii negotiating for months 
with the hourly employes, a period climaxed by picketing two 
months ago during a board meeting 
One id the major points of contention was a demand from 


Wednesday, July 5, 1972 


the employes that binding arbitration be included in the 
contract PCHA officials have maintained they are forbidden 
bv the state from submitting to binding arbitration, the 
sixth step in the grievance procedure. 

In the new contract the authority has agreed to go to court 
and seek a legal decision on whether or not it can include 
binding arbitration in its grievance procedure. 

The 18-cent an-hour raise reflects a 5 5 per cent increase 
Hie contract was ratified by Tx>cal 79. Service Employes 
Inlet national Union, AFL-ClO, Wednesday night. 

According to PCHA officials, of the l .100 employes affected 
by the new contract. 263 voted, approving it by a 16-vote 
margin 


The board also improved the pension plan for hourly 
employes and included major medical benefits in the con- 
tract. 

A proposal to provide life insurance for salaried employes 
equal to P 2 times their annual base salary was approved, 19- 
12, with Rev Heidmann voicing opposition to the rationale 
behind providing that for salaried employes and only $5,000 
insurance for hourly employes. 

Rev. Heidmann maintained the board was working under 
the assumption that fringe benefits should be equal to the 
salary differential of the various classes of employes. 

(Continued on Page A-9> 




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FUll CENTER CUT 

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Wednesday, .lulv 5 . 1972 


A PANAX PUBLICATION 


Hourly workers ’ 

raise to cost 

PC HA $28,000 


(Continued from Page A*8l 

“It s a way of opening up the door to v ery great inequities, ** 
he said. 

He explained that he had no objection to the employes 
getting whatever salary they were receiving, just to the extra 
renumeration 

He said he felt the differentia) between the employes 
“ought to be reflected in salaries, not fringe benefits ” 

Charles Younglove. at-large member who is regional 
president of the Steelworkers Union, argued that the 
proposal was “not dealing in good faith*’ with the union 
employes. 

According to Donald Pizzimenli, board chairman, the 


board fell justified in approving it since the hourly employes 
increase, including fringe benefits, had come out to 6.5 per 
cent, while the salaried employes’ increase was 6 12 The life 
insurance proposal brought them both in line 
Younglove argued that six per cent of the salaried em- 
ployes’ earnings were much greater than that of the hourlv 
worker 

“We make them believe it’s the bottom of the barrel.” he 
charged, but have more put aside for the salaried workers 
According to Pizzimenli, the union had not requested it in 
the negotiations, while the administration had asked for it for 
the salaried employes. 

The proposal will cost an extra $28,000 annually. 


Page A-9 



'A^remember, when they ask for an honest opinion 


AT VESCIO'S YOU GET 


ch a Say fat f 


QUALITY PLUS SAVINGS 


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FOR A PLEASURE FILLED BREAKFAST 

CANTALOUPES 

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CALIFORNIA 


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Pane A-10 


A PANAX PUBLICATION- 


Wednesday. July 5. 1972 


Ponytail 


Laff time 


They 7/ do it every time 



“Oh. goodie! Here comes Hobie. Rachel, Donald, Sue, 
Karen. Frank, Carol, Roy, Tim, Wanda, Fred, 
Marge!...*’ 




“My wife may not know how to cook, but she knows 
how to use a frying pan.” 


Bumper sticker 


Locxm&TSfz. wwrftwrs 

TSOT MSN COOK CflA/SSK. 


This funny world 


'91972 McNiuqhi Syndicate It* 


* s 


CARROLL RIAUTBD'ft 




C toss word By Eugene Sheffer 

ACROSS 
1. Danny or 
Sammy 
5. Tainted 
8. Edible 
rootstock 

12. Amo. 
amas, — 

13. Slender 
Onial 

14. Ardor 

15. Fund-rais- 
ing per- 
formance 

17. Russian 
river 

18. Compass 
reading 

19. Possessed 

20. Edible nut 

21. Weight 
unit 

22. Surpass 

23. Young 
pigeon 

26. Scent 
bags 

30. Egg- 
shaped 

31. Moo 

32. Olive 
genus 

33. Loose, 
outer 
garment 

35. Ria, for 
one 

36. Insane 

37. American 
humorist 


38. Biblical 3. New Eng- 
name land 

41. Entire college 

amount 4. Summer 

42. Paid on the 

notices Seine 

45. Redact 5. Irish play- 

46. Kind of wright 

message 6. Footless 

48. Identical animal 

49. Crude 7. Continued 

metal loud noise 

50. French 8. Bell’s 

river brainchild 

51. Hebrew 9. Fish sauce 

measure 10. Frog 

52. Trifle genus 

53. Assess 11. Biblical 

DOWN name 

1. Girl’s 16. Norse 

nickname god 

2. Popular 20. Leather 

singer moccasin 

Average time of solution: 26 minutes 


Answer on 
Page B-13 


21. Distance- 
measur- 
ing instru- 
ment 

22. Crow’s 
call . 

23. Burst 
open 

24. The yel- 
low bugle 

25. Chum 

26. Drunkard 

27. House 
wing 

28. Head of 
the fair- 
way 

29. Perched 

31. Danish 

weight 

34. Child’s 
game 

35. Vain 

37. Bowling 
lane 

38. Mexican 
coin 

39. A cheese 

40. A fruit 

41. Air: comb, 
form 

42. Heard at 
La Scala 

43. Flit 

44. Pintail 
duck 

46. Small 
child 

47. Pikelike 
fish 



General tendencies: A wonderful day and evening to 
quietly enjoy wherever you happen to be this holiday period 
and expecially to tune in on nature’s beauties, or to do the 
things that bring you peace, tranquility and the un- 
derstanding of ideas you wish to guide your actions in the 
future. Think in terms of a new approach to long-standing 
interests. 

Aries (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Long-distance matters and 
persons need to be handled well now, whether by mail 01 
telephone. Consult with new contacts and have a better un- 
derstanding of what is happening around you. Show more 
consideration for neighbors, too. 

Taurus (Apr. 20 to May 20) Paying more attention to in* 
titutive promptings is wise today, since they can be more 
helpful and accurate. If you are diplomatic with those at 
home, this can be a most delightful evening. Courtesy is most 
important now. 

Gemini (May 21 to June 21) Sitting down with allies and 
good pals and talking over important matters makes this a 
most produtive day, p.m. for you. Forget about going off on 
tangents. Get on the good side of others by paying hoest 
compliments. 

Moon Children (June 22 to July 21) You have fine ideas 
about how to handle special work you have to do efficiently, 
as well as civic matters. Evening is excellent for impressing 
higher-ups. Show you have true ability, charm. 

Leo (July 22 to Aug. 21) Prove to associates that you have 
great ability and give them the boost and confidence they 
need at this time. Experts will appreciate you more if you are 
open minded. Change attitude with kin in p.m. and get good 
results. 

Virgo (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Whip up some enthusiasm for 
the work at hand and you get it done accurately and quickly. 
Cooperate more with associates. Take the right treatments to 
improve your health. 

Libra (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Now that you can be with a 
partner, find out what is expected of you and do you utmost to 
cooperate and show your ingenuity. Don’t give in to what an 
opponent desires of you. Be sure to stand up for your rights. 

Scorpio (Feb. 23 to Nov. 21) Discussing your plans with 
partners who are concerned is wise and will lead to some 
good agreement. Buy the clothing you feel will give you a new 
look, make you most attractive. Stop cheating yourself. 

Sagittarius (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You have an opportunity 
for recreation you enjoy and can be with congenials you 
really like. Take a little time for exercise and tune up your 
health. Do only that work that is necessary. 

Capricorn (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) If you are not careful, you 
could touch off some big argument at home, so be diplomatic. 
Make your home as happy and harmonious as you can. stop 
sacrificing so much and you will be much happier. 

Aquarius (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) You are thinking cleverly and 
quickly and can accomplish a good deal that was impossible 
before. Get errands done and make appointments early. Buy 
the supplies that make you more efficient. 

Pisces (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Money is much on your mind, 
and the quickest way to make some is to cut down on ex- 
penses right away. Then get into some new outlet that adds 
to income. Your hunches are very good and should be 
followed. 

If your child is bom today he or she will be one of those 
charming young people with an excellent mind who will 
assist others to see everything more clearly. However, this 
youngester seldom does anything for others unless asked, 
since this is a studious mind. Teach early to cooperate with 
others more in order to have real rapport with everyone. A 
certain amount of sports necessary here, since the energy is 
quite great. Give spiritual training early. “The Stars impel, 
they do not compel.” What you make of your life is largely up 
to You! 

Carroll Righter’s Individual Forecast for your sign for July 
is now ready. For your copy send your birthdate and $1 to 
Carroll Righter Forecast (The Daily Eagle), Box 629, 
Hollywood. Calif. 90028. 


jfas. FLANNEL 
PRESIDENT OF 
THE LADIES' 

CLUB 

GUARANTEED 
THAT THE CHAIR- 
MAN OF THEIR 
BIG AFFAIR 
MOULD HAVE 
NO INTERFERENCE 
» 


So SEBORRHEA 
WORKS LIKE A 
DALMATIAN TO 
GET THINGS 
READY" - THEN IN 
STEPS MRS. F. 

'f’/ul-^-ANO ATIPPO AND 
TWIRL TO 
GORDON r^s 
WILLISON 

92*0 SlNSLS OAK 
PRIVB 

LAKESIDE, 

CALIF. 


Moose 




Quincy 



The Flintstones 



Redeye 


1WOSE «£AT ei* PILLS THEY 
YOU SAVE ME SURE MADE WEREN'T 

AXE feel a lot better, so bis 

MEDICINE MAN 




JVE LOOKED EVERYWHERE, 
DOCTOR, BUT I CAN’T FIND 
YOUR NEW BOXOFSOLF CA. 



Scamp 




Barney Google 











Wednesday, July 5, 1972 


A PANAX PUBLICATION 


Page A- 11 




Far Eastern 
Festival set 

An exotic "happening 0 that will feature entertainment, 
food and excitement from six countries — that's the Far 
Eastern Festival scheduled this weekend on the riverfront at 
Cobo Hall. 

Each of the six far Eastern countries — Japan, China, 
India, Korea, Pakistan and the Philippines — will offer the 
most delicious food from its cultures. 

There will be sweet and sour spareribs from China, 
vegetable curry from India, Japan’s beef sukiyaki, Korea’s 
Goon Mangoon (Korean egg-roll), chicken curry from 
Pakistan and rice cake and Emchemada from the Phillip- 
pines. And these are only a few of the taste treats to be 
available. 

There will be folk dances and fashion shows representative 
of each culture, plus demonstrations in judo and karate from 
Japan and Korea. Colorful Far Eastern imports will be of- 
fered festival shoppers. 

Admission is free. Hours are 6 to 11 p.m. on Friday, and 12 
noon to 11 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. 


Cherry 

Festival 

scheduled 

The National Cherry 
Festival in Traverse City will 
be celebrating its 46th year 
July 10-15. Some 400,000 are 
expected. 

Prominent in the event 
packed, six -day fete are at- 
tractions for lovers of good 
food. Young cooks prepare 
their prized recipes for the 
Junior Cherry Recipe Baking 
Contest, and area women give 
demonstrations of the 
preparation of their favorite 
cherry foods at the Cherry 
Bakefest. 

A walk through Cherry Lane 
where all kinds of cherry 
goodies, including cherry 
pizza and warm cherry pie are 
available, is another at- 
traction. 

Capping the week is the 
Cherry Smorgasbord Lun- 
cheon. Encircling the room 
are tables laden with salads, 
meats, rolls and other foods. 
The feature of the 
smorgasbord is a special 
display of cherry desserts 
prepared by area growers’ 
wives. 

Mighty teeth 

The teeth and jaws of the 
spotted hyenas are so 
powerful that they can crack 
large bones. 




STAN KENTON 

Kenton 
at Metro 
Beach 

The nationally famous Stan 
Kenton and His Orchestra will 
appear at the open-air dance 
pavilion of Metropolitan 
Beach along Lake St. Clair 
near Mt. Clemens on Sunday. 
Dance hours are 8:30 p.m. to 
12:30 a.m. 

Jerry Ross and His Five 
Plus Two will provide music 
for the "Dancing Under the 
Stars" program on Saturday, 
with hours 8:30 p.m. to mid- 
night. 

There is no charge for the 
dance program, except the 
usual 50-cent parking charge. 
For additional information 
phone HO 3-4581 (Mt. 
Clemens) or WO 3-3022 
(Detroit). 


THE PEARL — Opening next Wednesday for a five-day 
riai at the Pine Knob Music Theatre is Pearl Bailey. Ap- 
pearing with the all-around performer will be the Sylvers and 
The Little Steps, along with musical director. Louis Bellaon. 
The theatre Is locaed at 1-75 and Sashabaw Road. For ticket 
information call 559-9111. 

New admissions 
policy at museum 


A new* admissions policy is 
now in effect the Detroit 
Institute of Arts, but parents 
will be relieved to know that 
all children under 12 are free. 

The "Pay What You Wish- 
system also leaves the exact 
amount of contribution up to 
the visitor. 

Some $234.ooo must be 
raised by the Art Institute 
during the next 12 months to 
maintain the current level of 
operation and to keep the 101 
galleries open six days 
weekly, including Saturday 
and Sunday. 

The new discreationary fee 
includes a "suggestion" of $1 
adults and 50 cents for 
students. The only 
requirement, however, is that 
the visitor pay something, 
even if it is just a penny. 

Free admission, in addition 
to youngsters under 12, also is 
extended to senior citizens, 
students in organized school 


19th and 20th century artists 


Smith College art 
display at museum 


or tour groups, and the 
Founders Society, the 
membership group which 
privately supports museum 
activities and art purchases. 

The Institute of Arts is open 
daily, except Monday, from 
9:30 a.m. until 5 30 p'm. 


Mummy 

popular 

feature 


The unrivaled public star of 
the Detroit Institute of Arts 
has returned to stage center to 
mark the full opening of the 
newly-renovated and ex- 
panded Egyptian galleries. 

The museum’s most popular 
work of art, the mummy of the 
nameless lady from Thebes 
buried about the time of Christ 
has been re-installed in the 
new mummy display after 
months of restoration by 
conservators. 

"A paragon of ancient 
beauty.” commented William 
H. Peck, curator of ancient 
art. 


A virtual "Who’s Who" of 
European and American 
artists opens at the Detroit 
Institute of Arts today with the 
arrival of the Smith College 
Museum of Art collection. 

The display traces the 
development of modem art 
through key examples of 
almost every major style of 
the last 150 years. 

"The exhibition of 58 19th 
and 20th century paintings 
from this exceptional 
university collection is a 
tribute to the excellent taste of 
individuals who guided its 
growth since 1877 when it was 
begun on the Northampton, 
Mass, campus," said Dr. 
Frederick Cummings, 
assistant director of the Art 
Institute, who has installed the 
show in South Wing ground 
floor galleries. The exhibition 
remains through Aug. 13. 

European masterpieces 
include two Picasso paintings, 


"La Table" of his synthetic 
cubist period and "Les 
Miserables” of his earlier 
‘rose period’; Edouard 
Manet’s haunting "Portrait of 
Marguerite de Conflans:’* 
Gaude Monet’s turbulent "The 
Seine at Bougival;” Gustave 
Courbet’s complex "Dressing 
the Bride" and many others. 

American artists of the 19th 
centurv include Thomas 
Eakins, Albert Bierstadt, 
William Merritt Chase and 
James Abbott McNeill 
Whistler. 

Twentieth century artists 
are represented by Gris, 
Morandi, Kirchner. Leger, 
Sheeler, Tanguy and Franz 
Kline. 

The collection displays a 
number of unfinished works of 
great painters because, in 
purchasing. Smith could not 
compete financially with 
major museums for finished 
canvases and, as a teaching 


tool, "fragments" may well 
convey the great work of an 
artist as much as a finished 
example. 


MAI KAI 


337 OOOI 
PLYMOUTH RD. AT FARMINGTON RD. 



JACK ICITNnON* BARBARA HAMUS 

"^e^RBCTU £€* 

llrV * 

f JASON ROBAROS PG <s* 



Camelot 


581-5040 

WEST WARREN AT MILLER ROAD 



m » 


There was a notch on her 

gun for every man she got. 

ifeMpei "tkuinie 
. uieiefi (cuilder** 


PMWWIHIIW5WM! 

OUR NEXT 

attraction 




JOLLY ROGER drive-in 


"HANNIE 

CAULDER” 

RAOUfcL WKUH 



292-5330 

VAN BORN RD. W. Of TELEGRAPH 


PAINT YOUR 
WAGON" 



Archie Bunker has 
little book of sayings 


B> JERRY BUCK 

Associated Press Writer 

HOLLYWOOD <AP> - 
What do Chairman Mao and 
Archie Bunker have in 
common? Each has his own 
little book of sayings. 

Mao’s book is Red red Ar- 
chie’s is a patriotic red, white 
and blue 

Mao’s thoughts are revolu- 
tionary. Archie’s are no less 
inflammatory but much 
funnier. 

"The Wit and Wisdom of Ar- 
chie Bunker,” newly 
published in a paperback by 
Popular Library, is a com- 
pilation of Archie’s 
outrageous remarks from 
CBS’ "All in the Family." 

‘My Three Angels 9 
continues at Barn 


The man who gave currency 
to "stiffle,” "dingbat" and 
"meathead" speaks out on 
sex, race, politics. Women’s 
Lib and many other subjects. 

Much of the book records 
exchanges between Archie 
and other members of the 
cast, but here are a few short 
examples: 

—"Wages and prices. It’s 
what you call your spiral 
staircase." 

—"If you’re gonna have 
your change of life, have it 
right now! You got exactly 30 
seconds ... change!" 

—"Well. I’ll tell you one 
thing about Richard Nixon He 
keeps Pat home Which was 
where Roosevelt should have 
kept Eleanor Instead he let 


"My Three Angels’’ con- 
tinues at the Macomb Theatre 
At-The-Barn Thursday 
through Sunday. 

Adapted from the French 
farce by Albert Husson, the 
play teils the tale of three 
convicts from Devil’s Island 


who use their particular and 
peculiar talents to assist a 
sadly harassed shop keeper 
and his family. 

Curtain is 8 p m. at the 
theatre. Hall Road (M-59) at 
Garfield Admission is $2.50 


ATTENTION! 
GUYS & GALS 

SINGU -DIVORCED • WIDOWED 
Don'! sil homo alone! Meal 12 
now guys or gals a year. They 
aro wailing !o moot you Join 
our club Michigan residents 
only Next Trips - Las Vegas & 
London. For a membership app- 
lication, call or write 

CONFIDENTIAL DATING 
& TRAVEL CLUB 

Box 922. Dearborn. Mich 48121 
561-3031 



Family Pleasing Food. Daddy 
Pleasing Prices. 









Regular Dinner $1.44 
3 pieces of chichen, 
mashed potatoes and 
qravy, cole salw and 
hot biscuits. 

Thrift Box $2.75 
9 pieces of chicken 


Family Bucket$4.3& 
15 pieces of chicken. 
1 pint of gravy and 
6 biscuits. 


FRIED CHICKEN 

4429 S. WAYNE RD., WAYNE Ph. 326-0161 


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Fresh Ocean Perch All Yew Can Eat 
Banquet 4 Meeting rooms available 

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OWONESe VILLAGE 


7107 N. 


WAYNE RD nr. 

Westland 


Warr«n 


GENERAL CINEMA CORPORATION 


MOVIE GUIDE 


U PARISIEN 


Garden t»iry 

Mat. Wed. 2" Shows 1:00 & 2:45 Adults $1.00 
Richard Benjamin "Portnoy's Complaint” (R) 

plus "The Crunchbird" 


l 2:45 A 


STATE-WAYNE 


Wayne PA 12 

All seats $1.00 Mon Thru Frl. 

Charlie Brown 
"Snoopy Come Home" (G) 
John Wayne 
"Rio Lobo" (G) 
Matinee Daily 1:00 


WAYNE DRIVE-IN I 


ALGIER'S DRIVE-IN 


Westland GA2 8810 

Walt Disney's 

"Bedknobs and Broom- 
sticks" (G) 

Walt Disney's 
The Barefoot Executive (G) 
"The Adventures of the 
Roadrunner (G) 


Wayne 


PA 1-3150 


Wayne PA 1-3150 


Arthur O'Connell 
"Ben" (PG) 

Sir Ralph Richardson 
"Tales From The Crypt" 
(PG) 


/ayne PA 1-3150 

Big 3 Unit Show 
No 1 Raquel Welch 
"HannieCaulder" (PG) 
No. 2-Lee Marvin 
"Paint Your Wagon" (PG) 
No. 3 "Texas Longhorns" (G) 


Quo Vadis 

Entertainment Center 


WARREN 4 WAYNE ROS-OPPOSITE HUDSON'S WESTLAND 
The world's grootost movlo complex • 4 theatres In l Building 
IMAT. WED. ALL THEATRES -1 SHOW -1 PJVL ADULTS $1.00 


QUO VADIS I 


Westland GA 5-7700 

Alan Arkin 

"The Last of the Red Hot 
Lovers" ( PG) 

West!an^^^^^2A^9W 

Burt Reynolds 
"Fun" (PG) 

Dick Van Dyke 
"told Turkey" ( PG) 


QUO VADIS 


Westland GA5 7700 

Arthur O'Connell 
"Ben" (PG) 
Barbara Perkins 
"Puppet on a Chain" 
Starts Frl "Bullitt" 
plus 'Bonnie & Clyde" 


PENTHOUSE 


■ 


Alfred Hltchock's 
"Frenzy" ( R) 


her run around loose till one 
day she discovered the 
colored We never knew they 
was there She told them they 
was getting’ the short end of 
the stick and we been havin’ 
trouble ever since ” 

— "When I wanna learn 
about pollution, it won’t be 
from no millionaire actor 
who’s got nothin’ to do but sit 
on his duff and dream up 
causes. If he wants to un- 
pollute something, let him 
unpollute the movies All them 
nudies.” 

— it’s moments like this 


where the only thing that holds 
a marriage together is the 
husband bein’ big enough to 
step hack and see where his 
wife is wrong ” 

In some cases Archie’s hu- 
mor comes through more 
clearly than on the show 
because- you can see in print 
his misuse <>f words. For in- 
stance “You’re taking it out 
of contest ” it’s just a 
pigment of your imagination." 
"This political percussion is 
over as of here and now." 
"Smells like a house of i|] 
refute, if you ask me.” 


Scene 
A ({out 

WITH 

CAP PATRIC 


For Information Regarding Ttm Column Call 47 7-6SH 



• THE VOLUME OF MAIL involved in piloting live Newspaper 
Columns, one being a lonely hearts - type production, gets pretty 
heavy at times But our mailbag these days shows a marked 
increase in adjectives related to BEAU-J'S LOUNGE. 13090 
Inkster Rd., at Schoolcraft, In Redtord. People have never lacked 
for nice things to tell us about the Beau. But here of late they're 
bordering on outright adulation in praising the attributes of a 
pair of people named "THE FRIENDS". The scope of "The 
Friends" ability seems endless and ONE letter actually sent me 
back to look and listen again the next night! It's true, they're 
weighty Entertainers; capable of everything the word En- 
tertainer implies. Ifyouwanttohearit.nameit! They'll give you 
a rendition you'll be sorry you didn't tape. You'll do like us. and 
like a LOT of folks who let us know they, too, went back again. 
And, at Beau-J's Lounge, you'll be listening with the help of 
something like Capital P rime and maybe Martinis or 
Manhatians..by the JUG! So take your pen along IVr love to hear 
you agree with us! 

• OPENING YESTERDAY for a 12 day engagement at THE 
IRON MASK LOUNGE, 20949 Joy Rd., in Westland, was a four- 
man Louisiana based Group named "MANCHILD" and if 
you've listened to Folk-Rock before.. you' II understand why they 
had to. HAD TO. .open on Independence Day! A group combining 
each his own metaphores, similies, and ability, they build a 
conglomerate Gospel - Jazz Folk - Rock block of harmony and 
sound tight enough to sound like one voice and somewhere, deep 
In the background, dissonant enough to add spice to the Louisiana 
potpourri that will capture your mind and spark your 
imagination. You'll remember the name "Manchild" long after 
they're gone . and hear it again.. and again. The great spaghet 
tl..the Siciliano Pizza..the ooh such bunny type tray toters 
.. these don't change! But there's something new and BIG out 
Westland way. and It'sMANCHILD. AndBobCione has 'em live 
and lively.. GO. Travel 3 blocks E. of Middlebelt and STOP Child 
of man has never come on stronger. 

•THIS ONE LADY WROTE me a letter. .she said. Well I 
never!" But I read it all, Margie, and I say you MUST have! 
Everybody goes to THE DANISH INN, at 32305 Grand River, In 
Farmington. A handsome young man named Robert Nelson, who 
owns a national string of Figure Salons named "Playgirl", no 
I ess., is opening his newest just down the street fromThe Danish 
Inn and now aspires to becoming the 1st male Customer of nis 
own establishment. .having once discovered Dick's Cheflng and 
Pat Flowers blues and soul! "If the Indiana HO can't find me at 
the Salons" he sez, "they'll Just have to write to The Danish Inn!" 
So I was thinking, Margie, whenever people ask you what's 
between us.. you don't have to tell 'em. You cae just say we re at 
the "Inn" at the same time.. all the time. Let em think you go 
thereto see Bob Nelson 'Or to enjoy the greatest Danish food this 
side of the Ocean. Of course. Bob Is like me. HE knows a good 
figure when he sees on*, too. AND the greatest Danish food this 
side of the Ocean. Do you know, Pat Flowers can put this whole 
story to music, and people will NEVER figure out what gives 
with us?? 

• 

• ANOTHER THING WE CAN DO, is spend a pleasant hour in 
another world Astronauts aren't the only people who can get 
away from it all, you know. We can go to the HI LOY 
RESTAURANT, at 29195 Plymouth Rd., just E of Wonderland. A 
little piece of native China is tucked away In the snug Shopping 
Center on that comer, where it can and DOES service large 
crowds of people seeking TRUE Cantonese Cookery! If you've 
been to San Francisco or Hawaii and remember how different, 
and how GOOD Chinese Food canreally be., this place will make 
you a little nostalgic. It did me . but you lust CAN'T be sad.. when 
you're full of Crisp Egg Rolls.. Sweet & Sour Shrimp, Chicken and 
Pork. .Wo Dip Harr, with fresh Shrimp and Bacon 8. Almonds 
..Plum Sauce.. or. OH! Margie.BUCK TOY! That'll send em 
scurrying tor Dictionaries, Honey. In the meantime, you and 
me.. we know where it's at. Lissen, what makes people ask you 
what we're up to? Fill 'em fulla Beef Tenderloin Chop Suey, Isay, 
and they'll be content with their OWN deeds And they'll be busy 
calling 425-8020, so HI LOY can pack some up for 'em to take 
bonne! 

• "A CHAPERONE", I told my Gal, "is someone who can no 
longer make the team.. but Is still In there Intercepting the 
passes." This doesn't phase her. ’'Mother goes with us," she sez. 
Okay, so what can I do but compliment Mother on her good taste? 
After all, we were going to theCARRIAGE HILL, at 27200 Cherry 
Hill, in Dearborn Heights! And a reservation for T W Oon Satd'y 
niteDOES mean two! But we toasted Mama as she sat on the 
gigantic hearth that runs along one well. .with a line of other 
hopefuls who were waiting for tables.. and it was a sizeable 
line.. with a sizeable reason! The Carriage Hill Menu boasts a 
magnificent choice of Seafood, Fresh and delectable like my 
love. Rare beef Crisp Salad. Effervescent Desserts Big 
libations. Enough? NOT at Carriage Hill! There's the DON 
McKENZlE COMBO, whlchlzza story In itself. Don's artistic 
talent extends in many directions, even to the gifted portraiture 
that people are buying right off the walls, which is NOT the 
reason Don did the pictures! His scope shows, too, in I he musical 
arrangements that keep the sweet swing and BIG band lovers 
lining upl Itza beautiful package. Like my girl. .and her Mother. 

• HOW MANY YEARS AGO (If you know . don't tell) did we 
arrive by the "jalopy" full at Old Grand River & 12 Mile (NOW 
the 1-96 Wixom Exit) for BBQ'd Ribs 8. Chicken, still wet from the 
lakes . shouting, laughing, as if there was no tomorrow? Then 
Fred & Bea Burleigh came on the Scene and the place became 
"The Continental"., lust a real nice place to stop. And they made 
friends . and prospered.. and their family grew. Then, with the 
place established . and a |ob well done, it was time to retire. And 
their Son, Don took over. And with his Wife Betty and their young 
family he REALLY began to make things happen, Soon there 
was the NEW "CONTINENTAL LOUNGE & RESTAURANT '. 
Still a friendly place to go. And still the old-time Roadhouse 
idea, but with a today slant! You'll still see the neighbors 
dropping in. but now you'll find long dresses In the crowd here n 
there And Chef "Lanny"..who treated us well at the London 
Chop House and the Scotch 'n Sirloin. .began to create And Little 
Miss Marty put her Geetar onstage, where she can reach it every 
Saturday 8. Sunday evening. And it became "that great b»g old- 
new place . you know, where everybody's going .out Grand 
River." And we're back where we started from. Having just as 
good a time for a couple hours And laughing because now there 
ISa tomorrow And the new "Continental" is part of what makes 
It happy! 

•VICTORS, at 34410 FORD RD., In Westland, is getting to be the 
no liquor Family Dining place to be seen And a guy like me, who 
always treats the first person to recognize him Should 
remember that! But I get to thinking about the great fare and the 
plain American Menu with the just Italian enuff flavor and I 
keep going back and getting recognized! "Aren't you CAP 
PATRIC??" shouted the beautiful young lady Yes Maam" l 
allowed and looked around for her check. "I haven't ordered 
yet" said pretty Nancy Bartolo. "Just hold onto your wallet "So! 
waited and thought how pretty her Mommy Is, too' And klnda 
dropped my Petoskey Stone string tie into my pocket before I 
can't afford to be recognized ennymore! ) And in the meantime 
lovely Nancy put away a quarter-lb. meal • onoa- -bun • type 
Hamburger, with Lettuce, Tomato and Bermuda Onion which is 
served with French Fries. Cole Slaw and any beverage In the 
House And she chatted gracefully while she ate And she was 
charming over Cherry Pie ala mode And she was so sweet as she 
handed me the bill and kissed me goodbye And I said howTHAT 
made me GLAD she'd recognized me And she said "Uh huh" 
and added "G'bye Grandpa!" 














Page A- 12 


A PANAX PUBLICATION 


Wednesday, July 5, 1972 




AFTER THE 
4th JULY 

SALE 


29 North Junior High 
students receive all A’s 


Area students 
receive degrees 


St veral area sludenls were 
graduated recently from 
Wayne Slate University in 
ceremonies held at Cobo Hall, 
tk-tmil. 

Three Belleville students 
receiving diplomas were 
Barbara Natalie Black, 45912 
Oddes Rd., B.A. degree, 
Flora Edith Gibson, 8275 Oak- 
ville Waltz Rd., B.S.. and 
Ga>1e Julia (Zailyk) Bat- 
chelor. 47103 Water’s Edge 
Lane. M S. in nursing. 

The graduates from 
Romulus were: Robert D. 
Karam, 8512 Whitehorn, B.A.; 


Victoria Ribbron, 7007 
Niagara, B.A.; Alexander 
I^cRoy Kropog. 29075 Nor- 
thline Rd., B.S ; Lawrence A. 
Williams, 34121 McBride, B.S. 
in business administration; 
Irene Peters, 6005 Biddle, 
M.\ in math. 

Also from Romulus were: 
Daniel Arthur Kemp, 35796 
Garner, M S. in chemistry; 
Jan Anthony Christensen, 
15075 Streamway, masters in 
social work; Norbert 
Leonard Wegienka, 32172 
Bruce, masters in education, 
and William Wen. 9341 Lisa 
Dr.. M.S. in mechanical 
engineering sciences. 


twenty-nine students 
i ived all A s for the second 
icstcr at the North Junior 
IP. » School in Belleville 

udents listed on the honor 
i during the semster in 
< u i*. 

seventhghaoe 

All A" 

• s* L-o<ja Ct'CO. Connie A Cook 
U .Ofah Oicfrrch. Karen Dunharr 

Customs 
permit let 

building 

\ remodeling program for 
Ur U.S. Customs otfice at 
Detroit Metropolitan Airport 
has been approved by the 
Romulus Building Depart- 
ment. 

The U.S. Customs ofhce is 
l<Xutedat the north end of the 
North Termina l Building. 

V building permit for the 
i v Modeling, which has an 
estimated cost of $25,663 has 
been issued to Englehardt, 
Buettner & Holt Inc., a 
building firm in Royal Oak. 

The building department 
ai issued a building permit 
to Bernard Gorski of 1521 N. 
Vernon, Dearborn, for the 
construction of a one-story 
commercial building on the 
s>uth side of Wick Road 
between Inkster arid Mid- 
dlebelt Roads. 


T ,i ■ > i • 1 1 y F ichrr Trrr^a Franklin. 
K.iiMocn Gnesv Mar. Lynn Horton 
Evriyn Jackson Kjfin E Koek 
Kathryn McClure Dmup Oslrowski 
K .tliileen Plnpps Soy Rutherford 
D.*vct Thompson Dooms Thompson and 
Keith vV>Hi«jms 

•B * 

Ocity Jean Alien Jane* Anderson. 
Mikr Bnld< rston Lrnda Barker. Charles 
Bt-awers. Cyn*h.a Bell. Judith Blv. John 
. t-'i • n Bov. ns Keith BrrMhaupl. 
Grrtj ji y Buckner Edward Budr»ek and 
Donald Buhro 

Elizabeth Cauiey Gregory Cicotte 
Pair >c«a C»a, ton Benny Collms James 
Co*, John i Co* Michelle Cullln. 
WonaU Curl«s Karen Dickerson. Jimmy 
Di<r, Scoll DuBO'S. Kimberly EiChold. 
Joseph Fnsch, Janice French and 
Harold Gable 

tcelhe Gale. Michelle Ganihler. Larry 
Gelre. Lurn Golden. Laura Haqerman 
Karl Hall. Jane! Harper. Steven Harsch. 
Garry Hcnnksson. Cheryl Holm, Jen 
n,fer Hook Mar ga Huddleston Cynthia 
Hudson. Robert Jesse and Mike J 
Jordon 

Donald Krller. Andre Scott Keyser 
Su< 3 n Krebs Christ laskowski Joni 
t ndblad. Melissa Mansel. Laura 
Maynard. Kathy McGr.lt. Lisa Master. 
Ronald Meier. Richard Muse, Julie 
rtclson. Marsha Owen, and Paula 
Pi Hecchia 

Lnda P.erce Ina Piet;. Jenelte 

Oumjy, Jane Reinhackel. Rob»n 

Sanionek O'ane Selle Randall Shoults. 

Mar y S.mkiss, Carol Sm.lh, Kenneth 
Star lm. Terri Slead and Robert Stewart 
Mark Sioelfon. L*nda Surrett. Tina 

Sweaii. Sheila Thurman, Craig Wash 
horn. Alan Wrgia. Pam Weipert. Lauren 
Wticolock. Marga While. Jan 
Wisn.fwsk., Willie Wright. Chrstine 
Wylie and Keith Young 

EIGHTH GRADE 

AID "A" 

Scott Beck. Lyla Blade Linda Bur 
yrell. Beverly Co*. Anne Griffith, and 

Candy Hammond 

••B • 

James Amerman. Cynthia Ailmon. 
Cynthia Armstrong. Thomas Bauer. 
Michael Blazer. James Brown. Margot 
Brown Jeanne Brunner. Kathy Bulifant, 
David Carnahan, James Ccerello. Gail 
Susan Clark. Lorre Dunn and Cynthia 
Edmonds 

Robert Freysmger. Terri Gamble. 
Daniel Gary. Mark Gauthier Ruth 
Gelre. Marion Gerow Mark Gray. Dawn 


Area student 
visits CMU 

Kevin W Meyer of 127 
Madelon St., Belleville, was 
among more than 1,100 
students who participated in a 
one-day orientation session 
recently held at Central 
Michigan University. 


State Medical Society 


honors 46 legislators 


Grow Sandra Hammond Haney Harris. 
Steve Haveraneck. Leann Hemphill 
Kathy Henderson Cynthia Howton 
Tracey HuQhes and Susan Ireland 
Mary Jarrell Denise Johnson. 
Kathleen Johnson Carole kaulit;. Don 
Koleihut Donna Keyser Kathleen 
KinseMa. Nikki Morans. Chrstina 
Knys/ Jocquclyn Lamance Randal 
Lancaster Chen LeBlanc and Susan 
Song 

Stephen MacDonald Patricia 
McGuire Nancy Merreli Deborah 
Messer. Karen Miller, Kenneth Miller, 
Sharon Miller Thomas Miller, Lester 
Mullms. Paincia Mullins, Kathleen 
Nugent, Joanne Olio. Jeone Paulsen. 
Juba Pr.est Sharon Reaves and Scott 
R«ce 

Tamara Rice. Russell Rooks Kalhy 
Rouster Conrad Samonek. Donna 
Schimmel Edwin Schroeder. Randy 
Schulz Thomas Seymour, Leslie Smith 
Joy Sop* Larry Spmo Gail Upton. 
Deborah Ware. Sharon Waver. Mark 
Weiss Mark Westerberg Margaret 
Whitmer Kathy Wisniewski and Ted 
ZiOlkOWSki 

NINTH GRAOE 

Suzanne Devenny. Patrick Gefre. 
Michelle Good. Kenneth Hall, Susan 
Mosey Sharon Potrasky Theresa 
Schall 

"0 * 

Onborah Anderson, Elaine Banes. 
Kathleen Bassett Jeffrey Beck. 
Rhonada Beech. Ricardo Bclville. 
Randy Block. Katherin Blossom. 


Suzanne Brown Sherry Buckner. Robert 
Budrick Diane Cauiey and Cindy 

C KOI to 

Cynlh»a Clark Bonnie Coldiron. 
Pamela Colwell. Patricia Colwell 
Margaret Cross Brian Cullln, Steve 
Davis. Shirley Day Lawrence Deel, Joel 
OeTar Jackie Dol.n Sandra Edmonds. 
Diana Ellis and M.fchell Ellison 
Debra Farmer. Kent Ferner Jud.th 
Drydrych Cynlh.a Gcrcak. Karla 
Gibbs Karen Greathouse. Troy Green. 
Daniel Greene. Karla Hall. David 
Ham. lion Patricia Henderson. Denise 
Hilton Mark Honeycutt. Cathy Hudson 
and Todd Humphrey 
RocheH inqraham, Oavid Jackson, 
James Jarrett, Carol Jones. Renee 
Susan Jones. Holly Kenyon Ralph Joek, 
Tommy Kromer. Michael Kucish. Ileana 
Kumar Matthew Kuzel. Donald 
L eonard, Joanne Lmdblad. Patrick 
Lobhesiael Gene Lucler. and Kathy 
Memerlng 

Barbara Messer. Deborah Mickus, 
Sheryle Milligan, Robert Moran Oena 
Mullms Sharlcne Myers. BobbeMe 
Olson, Mark Ostrowski. Nancy 
Ostrowski Jeanette Parker Nicholas 
Radovic. Kimberly Richie, Jeffrey 
R.ggs, and Kris Ryback 
Kathleen Salutz. Sandra Scothorn. 
Gayle Simons. Connie Smith Debra 
Sm-ih Gale Southard. Susan Smith, 
Richard Sprout. Tammy Sweatt. 
Deborah Thompson. Karen Tussev. 
Sheree Vincent. Elizabeth Vorlch, 
Robert Ware. Cindy Waren, John 
Weipert. Lynne Wheelock, Michelle Will, 
Cynthia Wright and Robert Wyman 


NEW CHAIRMAN — Robert 
I). Plank, of 9960 S. Wayne Rd. 
has been elected new chair- 
man of the Romulus 
Democratic Club. Installation 
of new officers will be held at 
the VFW Hall on Huron River 
Drive nil July 29. 


The Michigan State Medical 
Society has formally ex- 
pressed appreciation to 46 
members of the State 
Legislature who represent 
Wayne County, including four 
local legislators. 

Sen. David A Plawecki (D- 
12 \ and Reps. Thomas Brown 
< D-37 ) . Edward Mahalak (D- 
38) and James Tierney (D-36) 
were among those lauded for 
voting to repeal the law which 
requires foreign medical 
school graduates to take a 
basic science exam to practice 
in Michigan. 

In letters to the legislators, 
Sidney Adler, MD. of Detroit, 
president of the 8,000-member 
state medical society, praised 
action by the Michigan State 
Legislature, which in late May 
voted to eliminate the 35-year- 
old requirement. 

Praise for the legislature's 
action was voted by the MSMS 
Council, the 26-member body 


that functions as the society’s 
board of directors, at its June 
meeting. 

Since 1964 the medical 
society has urged repeal of the 
rule which has required 
physicians trained in other 
countries, including Canada, 
to pass a basic science 
examination in addition to the 
regular licensure examination 
required for all new medical 
graduates. 

The medical society urged 
elimination of the 
examination because it was nc 
longer needed as a protection 
to the people of Michigan, it 
covered little material not 
included in the licensure 
examination and it tended to 
discourage physicians from 
Canada and other countries 
from practicing in Michigan, 
Doctor Adler said. 

“As doctors of medicine, w 
will welcome these physician 
as colleagues and know tha 


their practice within oyr stati 
will benefit our people," 

“More specifically, the 
elimination of this 
discriminatory measure will 
aid the Michigan State Medical 
Society, the Michigan Health 
Council and other groups in 
their efforts to bring more 
physicians to Michigan." 

Bids asked 
on city cars 

The Romulus City Council 
has authorized the taking of 
sealed proposals on the 
purchase of two new official 
vehicles for the city. 

The sealed proposals will on 
the purchase of a four-door 
sedan and on a nine passenger 
sedan. 

Bids must be submitted to 
the city clerk’s office by 5 p.m. 
July 27. City Clerk Leonard J. 
Folmar announced. 


Railroad ordered 
to install gates 


The Chesapeake & Ohio 
Railway Company has less 
than 180 days to install 
roadway gates at a heavily 
travelled crossing, located on 
the boundary line between 
Huron and Ash Townships, 
Se»» William Faust <D- 
Wcstland) has announced. 

Installation of the gates at 
the railroad crossing with 
Oakville-Waltz Road, between 
Car let on and Mineral Springs 
roads, was order by the 
Michigan Public Service 
Commission after thorough 
study and inspection, said 
Faust. 

** \t» inspection report shows 
the n»ad carries a reported 
2.582 vehicles daily as of last 
November, and that up to 30 
school buses traverse the 
crossing on school days," he 
said. 

“Automatic flashing light 
signals now protecting the 


crossing are simply 
inadequate when the lives of 
so many people and school 
children are at stake. 

“I am gratified that the 
Public Service Commission 
look prompt action on my 
inquires about the safety of 
this crossing," he added. 

The commission report 
further noted that the speed 
limit near the crossing is 65.55- 
miles per hour, the normal 
limit for two-lane highways. 

\t cording to the report, 
railroad movements over the 
crossing consist of freight 
trains, numbering up to 14 
each w-ay. A maximum speed 
of 45 miles per hour is allowed, 
and movements may occur 
day or night. 

“These facts more than 
amply justify the need for 
crossing gates," said Faust. 
“1 hope the railroad company 
will take prompt action on the 
commission’s order." 


Romulus takes 
over roadway 


The City of Romulus has 
assumed jurisdiction of 
Harrison Road between Wick 
Road and Hildcbrandt Street. 

An agreement to take over 
the section of road from the 
Wayne County Road Com- 
mission was approved at last 


week’s session of the Romuh 
City Council. 

The city delayed in takir 
official jurisdiction in Ma 
1970, when ihe communi! 
became a city, pending tl 
completion of road in 
provement program on tl 
road bv the road commissioi 


NOTICE 


Notice is hereby given of the intention of the Norfolk 
and Western Railway Company to close its Agency 
stations at Belleville. French Landing. Willis and Whit- 
taker. Michigan, withdraw its agent and remove the 
station depot building from Belleville, Michigan. 

Any protest of the proposed changes must be filed with 
the Michigan Public Service Commission. Lansing. 
Michigan, on or before July 15. 1972. 


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New Romulus coach has high hopes 


Hardy: ‘our goal is 9-0’ 


* 


JL 


By JltyFREER 
Sports Writer 

Romulus High’s football 
team fell one game short of 
the .500 mark in each of the 
last two seasons and ' new 
head coach Bill Hardy is 
confident that the Eagles will 
push themselves past the 
break-even barrier in 1972. 

Hardy, who served as 
Homulus’ defensive coor- 
dinator in 1970 and 71, was 
recently chosen to replace 
George Pratt in the head 
coaching position. 

Pratt held the job for five 
years and the 4-5 marks of the 
last two campaigns were the 
best during his tenure 

Hardy, a 27-year old 
alumnus of the University of 
Michigan, is familiar with the 
Romulus grid scene and he 
feels that only a few ad- 
justments will be required to 
turn the Eagles into a winner 


“I think we have the 
material for a winning team,” 
said Hardy, who is embarking 
on his first head coaching 
venture. 

“We’re going to try to 
communicate with the kids 
and make sure they’re awre of 
what we want to accomplish,” 
continued the new Eagle head 
man. "Our main goal is to win 
and we’re going to be con- 
vinced that we can.” 

Hardy knows what winning 
football is all about. 

He was an offensive tackle 
under coach Mike Haddad at 
Detroit’s Pershing High 
School and upon graduation in 
1963 be matriculated at the 
University of Michigan. 

Bob Hollway, who is now the 
head coach of the St. Louis 
grid Cardinals, was the 
assistant coach who recruited 
Bill for the U. of M 
At Michigan. Hardy played 
three years of varsity football 
as a defensive tackle. 


As a sophomore he was a 
member of the Bump Elliott- 
coached Wolverine team 
which defeated Oregon State 
in the 1965 Rose Bowl 

Hardy was a starter in his 
final two varsity seasons and 
after graduating in 1968 he 
spent a year teaching at an 
Ann Arbor junior high school 

Bill later earned a Master’s 
degree in guidance and 
counseling at Eastern 
Michigan. 

In addition to his coaching 
duties Hardy is a guidance 
counselor at Romulus High. 

He resides in Ann Arbor with 
his wife, Carol, and two 
children, Vicki and Billy. 

His coaching and playing 
experiences have oriented 
him toward defense, but he is 
able to look at football from 
the other perspective. 

“I feel that a high school 
team should concentrate on 


Enterprise-Roman 

Sports 


Wednesday, July 5. 1972 


Page B1 


building a sound, basic of- 
fense,” said Hardy. “I plan to 
put in some intricate stuff, but 
you won’t see us running the 
triple option. In high school 
you should look at your 
material, and then develop an 
offense and defense to fit the 
players that you have ” 

Hardy’s material will in- 
clude 18 lettermen. 

Among the players he will 


lx* counting on most are Virgil 
Smith, a senior quarterback, 
and Daryl Gooden, a senior 
linebacker and offensive 
tackle. 

‘Virgil is the player who 
will make our offense go.” 
said Hardy “He has the 
physical ability, he’s smart, 
and he’s a good leader He 
should play a big role in 
developing a feeling of pride 




Sports meridian 

Hardy’s 
biggest 
challenge 

By TOM MOORADIAN 
Sports Editor 



i,; 



BILL H ARDY 
A New Challenge 


Bill Hardy has been associated with football in one way or 
another for most of his 27 years. 

As a defensive and offensive tackle for Coach Mike Haddad 
at Detroit Pershing. 

As a defensive tackle for 
Chalmers W. “Bump” Elliott 
at the University of Michigan 
where he played three years of 
varsity ball in the early six- 
ties. 

And now as head football 
coach at Romulus High 
School. Hardy replaced 
George Pratt last month and 
already has began his new 
chores. 

He views his present 
coaching job “as the most 
challenging.” 

“Our kids will be aware of 
what we’re trying to ac- 
complish,” said Hardy, 
“we’re going to win. And our 
main goal is a 9-0 season.” 

Undefeated in 1972? Is 
Hardy kidding? The best of 
the Pratt years produced two 
4-5 won-lost seasons and no 
one in these parts can recall a 
Romulus football team going 
undefeated in modem times. 

“If I didn’t think we could do it, then I wouldn’t accept this 
job. If I don’t do positive things in two or three years I would 
definitely want out. 

“That’s the w'ay life is,” said Hardy. “If you w'ant a raise 
from your boss you have to earn it. You have to prove your 
worth. And we’re going to prove that Romulus can field 
winners in football.” 

Hardy pointed out that football is an excellent bridge “to 
bring the community together.” 

“I’m not saying that the community is divided now, but 
athletics is a means of bridging the young and the old, white 
and black, all of us together. 

“During the basketball season Romulus nearly closes 
down to follow their team and with a winning football team 
we will close down the city from September to March.” 

Hardy, who served as assistant coach to Pratt, also 
coached at an Ann Arbor junior high school and worked with 
the boys at Whitemore Lake. He is presently a counselor at 
the high school having earned his masters in guidance and 
counseling at Eastern Michigan University. 

Under the new state rules, Hardy and his future members 
of the team can get together for drills, but no contact allowed. 
And the new head coach isn’t wasting any time 
“It’s important for the kids to get to know each other so we 
can build understanding,” said Hardy, “in high school you 
have to build with the material at hand and not hope for some 
miracle.” 

Married to Carol, the Hardys have two children - Vikki and 
Billy. They make their home in Ann Arbor. 

Though the former Wolverine is only a few minutes away 
from U of M stadium, he isn’t planning on attending many of 
the games this Fall. 

"I can’t . We have a lot of work to do,” he said. 

• 

“Would you do me a favor?” said the boy. “Will you take 
me to Garden City to watch grandfather play?” 

Under ordinary circumstances the mother, in this case 
Mrs. Maureen Conser, would have pooh-poohed the request 
Fly her son from Clearwater, Fla., to Garden City, Mich., to 
watch a softball game, indeed. 

However, 13-year-old Mark’s request isn’t an ordinary one. 

It could be one of his last. 

Mark is suffering from progressive muscular dystrophy 
and has been confined to a wheel chair for years. Even his 
fingers, which at one time were able to operate the elec- 
trically-run wheel-chair, are losing their strength. 

Grandfather, who’s Jack O’Callaghan and quite a man in 
his own right, pitches for Acme Bookkeeping Bombers in the 
Garden City Parks and Recreation Softball League He s a 65- 
year-old former semi pro player. 

“The doctors didn’t give Mark much time to live," said 
O’Callagh n. “In fact, they said he wouldn’t live to see his 
12th year But he’s nearly 13 now. 

“When I heard he was coming up here to watch us play I 
contacted Ray Wiacek (Garden City Parks and Recreation 
supervisor) and we planned a little surprise for my grand- 
son.” * 

O’Callaghan said that after the game with Burton Plum- 
bing (which was to take place last night) the recreation 
department is to present Mark with a trophy upon which will 
be inscribed “Mark, No. 1 Sports Fan ” 

(Continued on Page 2) 



BIG MEN OF THE WEEK - Michigan 
State basketball coach Gus Ganakas stands 
with the best players in the 15 to 17 age 
bracket of the first basketball session at the 
MSI’ Athletic Instructional School. The 
awards were given to the players for the best 
shooting, free throws, rebounds, and assists. 


From left to right are Bob Ameen of 
Marquette, the All-Around Camper of the 
Week: Al Cicotte of Belleville. Rebounding 
Award; Ganakas; 1 Nevin Alexander of 
Springporl, Shooting Award; Blair Moss of 
Beulah. Assists Award; and Tom Shedd of 
Bad Axe, Free Throw Award. 


Walter Hink sets 
Ruth League pace 


and togetherness among our 
players.” 

Hardy called Gooden “a 
tremendous athlete who does 
everything well. Daryl leads 
the other kids by example and 
he’ll be the key to our 
defense.” 

The new head coach is also 
hopeful that several seniors 
who did not play last season 
will return to the Romulus 
grid ship 

Hardy has already started 
topreare for the 72 campaign. 

Optional weightlifting 
and conditioning sessions are 
being held each day and there 
has been a good turnout. 

The Romulus Board of 
Education will soon hire 
Hardy’s assistants and the 
Eagles should be w r ell 
prepared for the start of 
contact drills on Aug. 27. 

“There's a lot that we plan 
to do and we’re getting a lot of 
it out of the way in the sessions 
we’re holding now.” said 
Hardy. “The boys have all 
been enthusiastic and they’re 
becoming familiar with a lot 
of the things I plan to have 
them do in the fall. When my 
assistants are named they’ll 
be out meeting l he players too, 
and by the time practice starts 
we should all know each other 
pretty well ” 

Two ne;*' opponents, Detroit 
Thurstort* and Muskegon 
Heights, have been added to 
the Romulus schedule and 
Hardy knows that his team 
will be facing a tough road. 

But he’s looking ahead to his 
“greatest challenge” with 
confidence. 

“I believe in setting goals 
and trying to accomplish 
them,” said Bill. “I expect us 
to go 9-0. Winning is what 
football is all about and 
winning will be our goal.” 

Hardy hopes to start win- 
ning when his Eagles open at 
Inkster on September 15. 

The new Romulus coach is 
aiming high and its appears 
that he is ready to work hard 
as he attempts to achieve his 
goals. 



PERFECT FORM — Displaying a smashing form for 
lenms ... or otherwise ... is Sandy Siemak who is one of a 
score that have enrolled in the Romulus Recreation 
Department's tennis clinic. The clinic is under the super- 
vision of William Smith, the adult education director. 


Renko cards hole-in-one 


Frank Renko of Romulus 
shot a hole-in-one at the 160 
yard eighth hple at Shady 
Hollow Golf Club Sunday. 
Renko. who has been golfing 


for 11 years, used an eight iron 
to record his first ace. 

Renko turned in many other 
fine shots during his 18-hole 
round. 

* 


Belleville Babe Rum League 
Team yy ^ 

Walter Hmk 7 | 

Roberts Brothers 5 7 

Afchmson Ford 5 j 

P u A Lodge 4 3 

Rcbokk ah Lodge 4 4 

Campbell Group 3 5 

Clark Block j 5 

Hmk Enterprises 0 4 


Pace-setting Walter Hink 
improved its record to 7-1 with 
a pair of victories in the 
Belleville Babe Ruth League. 

Walter Hink defeated Clark 
Block. 4-2, and Campbell 
Group. 5-3. 

Rick Beavers hurled Walter 
Hink to its win over Clark 
Block. 

Joe Stillwagon belted a 
home run for the winners 
while Russ Rooks doubled for 
Clark. 

Winning pitcher Greg Ivan 
socked a three-run homer and 
a single as he led Walter Hink 
past Campbell 

Rick Ivan and Roy 
Rutherford added two hits 
apiece for Walter Hink. 

Gary Akins and Guy 
Kobuleck divided four hits for 
Campbell. 


Rebekkah Lodge also turned 
in a pair of triumphs. 

Rebekkah blanked Hink 
Enterprises, 2-0, and then 
topped Clark Block, 10-7. 

Ted Stanfel fired a one- 
hitter and struck out six as he 
pitched Rebekkah past Hink 
Enterprises. 

Pat Gefrey and Tom Cross 
drove in the winners’ runs. 

Stan King, Scott Jenks, 
Kevin Barnes, and Dave 
Jackson had two hits each for 
Rebekkah as it downed Clark. 

In a battle of first division 
teams Atchinson Ford topped 
Roberts Brothers Funeral 
Home. 6-2, behind the hurling 
of Greg Brown 

Roberts Brothers gained a 
split for the week by topping 
P.N.A I/xige, 9-1. 

Dave Dapsi pitched a one- 
hitter with 13 strikeouts and 
hammered a single and double 
as he carried Roberts 
Brothers to its win. 

Gary Farr also had two hits 
for the victors. 

In another game Campbell 
Group toppled Atchinson, 14- 
12. in eight innings. 


Metro Park sets 
swim pool hours 


Summer swimming pool 
hours have been set for the 
Lower Huron Metropolitan 
Park* 

The pool will be open from 
9:30 a. m. until 6 p.m. on week- 
days. 

On Saturdays, Sundays, and 
holidays it will be open from 
10:30 a m. until 7 p.m. 

The food service, which is 
adjacent to the pool plaza, will 
be open the same hours as the 
swimming pool. 

The park’s golf course will 
be open from 8 a.m. until dusk 


A nature center, nature 
trails for hikes, picnic areas, a 
tot lot, shelters, and 
playground areas are other 
features of the park. 

The park is located near 
Belleville with the entrance 
on Hannan Road, via the 
Haggerty Road Interchange 
along the 1-94 Freeway bet- 
ween Metropolitan Airport 
and Belleville. 

Additional information may 
be obtained bv phoning 697- 
9181 


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A PANAX PUBLICATION 


Wednesday. July 5, 1972 


Page R-2 


MIS to get 

another look 
at ‘hot’ Unser 


DETROIT- , . , 

When you’re hot you re hot. 
and race driver Bobby Unser 
has more than the usual in- 
centive to keep it that way 
when he comes to the 
Michigan International 
Speedway for the famed 
TWIN 200s auto races Sunday, 
July 16. 

When Bnbby Unser won the 
pole position for last year's 
200-mile Indianapolis 
speedway car race at the two- 
mile Michigan oval. his 193.414 
mph lap was an all time 
record for USAC racers 

Unser improved on that 
speed when he won the pole 
position last May for the In- 
dianapolis 500. and he knows 
this year’s M I S qualifying 
will surely see another all- 
time speed record, perhaps 
over the 200 miles an hour 
mark. 

As most workers realize, its 
often a little tougher doing 
your job with the boss looking 
over your shoulder. 



When Bobby Unser rolls 
onto that smooth asphalt track 
in the Irish Hills, he will not 
only have the boss looking on 
but mam dozens of his boss' 
friends and associates. 

t user drives the Olsonite 
Eagle, built and prepared by 
veteran Dan Gurney, but 
owned by Detroit’s Oscar L 
‘Ozzic’ Olson, President of the 
Swedish Crucible Steel Co. 
and a leading sports figure in 
the Motor City for many 
years, a former stockholder of 
ihe Detroit Lions football 
team, among other sports 
interests. 

Ozzie Olson is rightfully 
proud of the accomplishments 
of his Olsonite Eagles on the 
USAC Championship Trail the 
past few years, since his 
association with Dan Gurney. 

Sitting in the V I P lounge 
high above the main grand- 
stand at M I S. will be the 
friends of the boss and if the 
Olsonite Ealge performs as 
expected. Olson will accept 
the congratulations. If Bobby 
Unser doesn’t score, then 
Olson can expect his friends to 
bring out the long needle. 

When the Indy cars first 
raced at the Michigan track in 
the Irish Hills, Mario Andretti 
set the fastest qualifying time, 
at 183 67 miles an hour. Joe 
Leonard qualified the turbine 
car at Indianapolis that year 
at 171.953 mph 
Tickets for the July 16th 
Michigan Twin 200s at 
Michigan International 
Speedway are now on sale at 
The Daily Eagle offices. 34450 
Michigan. Wayne. Call 729- 
4000. 

Romulus 

softball 

schedule 

Thursoav Ju'V 6. 1972 

Jr Hgh School Rom Welding vs Hals 

Market. Couqhim Ar vs Rom Press 

Ppr 

H Qh School 'Tobme rd) Walter s Bar 
vs Reel Realty. 

Ml Pleasant Spearman s vs Kerr Mfg 
Co 

Harnson Morgan Manor vs Carpentry 
hv Woodcraft. 

wavt* Rom Hardware 6. Auto vs 
Progressive. Baums vs Rom Hard 

ware. 

Tuesday July 11. 1972 
t r High Scnool Morgan vs 
Progressive. Hardware &> Aufu vs Kerr 
M*g 

H-gh School tTnb.nel Cue Corners vs 
Press Repair 

Mt Pleasant Walters Bar vs Car 
oentry, 

Harrison Rom Weld-ng vs Baums 
Funeral Home. 

HAyt. Hal'S MM vs Reel Realty, 
Spearman’s vs Coughlin Air 


MICHIGAN 



USAC INDY CHAMPIONSHIP CARS AND STOCK CARS 

JULY 16TH 


(in 


Michigan 

International Speedway 


WITH DRIVERS SUCH AS: INDY 
WINNER MARK DONOHUE, BOBBY 
UNSER, MARIO ANDRETTI, AL 
UNSER, GARY BETTENHAUSEN, 

A. J. FOYT, ROGER McCLUSKEY. 


TICKETS ON SALE AT 


HAMILTON 

HARDWARE 

458 Main St., Belleville 697-9595 



DOLLARS FOR RECREATION — The newly established 
Van Buren Township citizens recreation committee isn’t 
wasting anv time trying to raise funds. The committee is 
sponsoring a raffle, with a Gemini 50 cc. SST mini-bike as the 
top prize, in order to collect funds to develop recreational 


facilities and organize programs In the community. One of 
the first purchasers of a raffle ticket is Henry R. Deering who 
picks up what hopefully is the lucky ticket from Steve 
Dziobak ( at left ) while he pays his dollar to John Dudlck. 


The Sports Meridian 

(Continued from Page 1) 

“Do you know that Mark knows all the players in the 
National League and their averages. He just loves baseball, 
the poor little guy ...” 

The words stuck. 

O’Callaghan said Mark would also be accompanied by his 
sister. Michelle. 

“In fact, if all of our grandchildren and children were in 
town, we would have some cheering section.” 

Jack and his wife, Alice, have seven children of their own, 
two step-children and 26 grandchildren. 

The Consers are formerly of Garden City. They moved to 
Ann Arbor and later took up residence in California, then in 
Florida. 

O’Callaghan grew up in the Flint area and pitched semi-pro 
baseball there. He has lived in Garden City for the past 35 
years. There were also other O ’Callaghans on the field last 
night Terry. Mark’s uncle, plays for the Bombers while 
Michael is a member of the Daly Drive Inn team 

“You know I've been around 65 years now and have seen a 
lot of things.” said O’Callaghan, “but each day I pray that 
someone will come up with a cure for all of man’s illnesses. 

“Life is too short as it is and it shouldn’t be spent worrying 
about incurable diseases.” 


Spearman’s stays 
undefeated in 


Here’s 
how to win 


Beverly School track 
mini-bike team, tops in Romulus 


Romulus slo-pitch 


Armed w ith the slogan. “It's 
for our kids." the newly 
established Citizens 
Recreation Committee 
comprised of Marj Lorentson, 
Latry Kranlz Peter Doyle, 
Ru^ Roberts and Ralph 
Hodman, has as its prime 
object to raising funds to build 
u combination skating and 
hockev rink in Belleville 
Although the committee was 
lonned by William A Loyd, 
director of Van Buren 
Township Parks and 
Recreation, it is not affiliated 
with the Township nr the city 
of Belleville. 

The committee is an in- 
dependent group concerned 
with the community children 
and providing them with 
reel eat ion. 

The chi i m it lee’s first raffle 
will have a Gemini 50 cc. SST 
mini-hike which is called the 
•Cadillac of Mini-Bikes” as 
•lie top prize. The hike was 
obtained through the 
(••♦operation of Lynn Hamilton 
Hardware 

Raffle tickets can be ob- 
lained from several local 
citizens, businessmen, players 
of the local hockey association 
.i'* well as from members of 
the committee 

The drawing date will be 
\ug 5 at the Sidewalk Sales in 
downtown Belleville 


Beverly School won the 
team championship in the 
Romulus Elementary School 
Track and Field Meet. 

Beverly totaled 151 points as 
it came away with the title. 

Romulus Elementary was 
the runner-up with 100 points. 

Cory placed third with 64 
points, followed by Hayti 
(59*2), Merriman (55). Mt. 
Pleasant (46). Harrison (43), 
and Gordonier ( 39 1 2 ) . 

The meet was co-sponsored 
by the Romulus Community 
School and the Romulus 
Jaycees 

More than 480 students 
participated in the meet. 
Results: 

1. Beverly 

440 Relay — Grade 4 
1 Beverly. 1 01. 2. Cory. 1 09; J. 
Harrison. 1.11; 4 Gordonier. 1.14; 5. 
Merriman. 1 : IS 

440-Relay — Grade 5 
l Beverly. 1 02; 2 Hayti. 1:05 3. 

Romulus El . 104. 4. Cor. 1:07: 5 Ml 
Pleasant. 1 08 

440 Relay — Grade 4 
I Beverly. I 02; 2 Romulus El . 1 04; 
3 Cory, i OS. 4 Ml Pleasant. 1:05.5; 5. 
Hayti. l 04 

60 Yard Dash — Boys — Grade 4 
I Powers (Romulus El). 14 2 

Gibson (Beverly). II; 3 Quantnn 
(Romulus El). 8 9 4 Eamas (Cory), 

f S. S Hevalter (Hayti) 9 6 

60 Yard Oash — Girls — Grade 4 
I. Rice (Beverly). 81 2 Kline 

(Romulus el ) 19; 3 Gray (Beverly) 

9 0, 4 Trosin (Merriman), 9$. $ Co* 
(Hayti). 10 1 

60 Yard — Boys — Grade S 
I Young (Beverly). 14. 2 Orwig 
( Hay tii 8 6. 3 Bercgnasy (Merriman). 
8 9 a White head (Beverly). 9 4 5 

Oems (Cory). 9 8 


Soltbail Throw • Girls Grade 4 
1. Rushavl (Harrison). 94 feet; 2 
Johnson (Beverly), 3. Kennedy (Gor- 
domcri 4 Mann (Gordonier); 5 
Wtiioughbiy (Merriman) 

Soltbail Throw Girls Grade 5 
i Kampan (Mt Pleasant). Hi’; 2 
Stephans (Harnson); 3 Rosen 
(Romulus El ); 4 Rekineer (Beverly); 

S Manner ( Hayti) 

Soltbail Throw Girls Grade 4 
t Houle (Merriman). 11**3"; 2 
Jenimette (Gordonier); 3 Terpek (Mt 
Pleasant). 4 Warren (Beverly); S. 
Hemsley (Gordonier) 

SOFTBALL Throw Boys Grade 4 
i Nemo (Merriman). 137*. 2 Parson 
(Harnson). 3 Abbott (Gordonier); 4 
Treder (Harrison). S. Eves (Romulus 
Ell. 

Soltbail Throw Boys - Grade S 
1 Summerlield (Romulus El ). 1ST; 2. 
Cam (Gordonier); 3 Laurea 
(Harrison) 4 Davis (Romulus El.); 5. 
Jcrnegan ( Mt Pleasant) 

Softball Throw Boys Grade 4 
I. Way iGordonier). 171*; 2 Maiseglia 
(Merriman) . 3 Montgomery (Hayti) . 4 
Marrow (Romulus El.); S. Owens 
( Merriman). 

40 Yard Dash — Girls — Grade 5 
1 Hancock ( Beverly), I S; 2 Franklin 
(Beverly), 8 6, 3 Dagger (Merriman). 

« l 4 Krma (Hayti). 9.2; S Phillips (Mt. 
Pleasant). 9 5. 

40 Yard — Boys — Grade 4 
t Hill (Romulus El ). 79; 2 Barley 
Beverly). 10; 3. Colus (Mt Pleasant). 

8 4 4 Russell (Merriman). I.S; S. 

Swanegan (Romulus El ). 1.6. 

40 Yard Dash — Girls — Grade 6 
1 Haarsl (Beverly). 7 9, 2. Cole 
icory). 1.3; 3 Hallereck (Mt Pleasant). 

8 4 4 Hall (Beverly). 9.1. S. Taperek 

(Ml Pleasant). 9.3. 

880 yd Run Girls 
Grade 4 

t Harris (Beverly). 3 25. 2 Hoppee 
(Romulus EI.13 21; 3 Leach (Harrison) 
3 38 4 Sammons (Haytil 3:39; S. Foster 
(Merriman) J4S 

Grade 5 

t Dagger (Merriman) 3:14; 2. 
Stephens (Hayti) 3 23; 3 Baker 

(RomulusEI I 3 24. 4 Shipp (Harrison) 
3 25 5 Kussa (Merriman) 3 33. 

Grade 6 

1 Warren (Beverly) 3 13. 2 Samuels 
(Havio 3 13 5; 3 Moore (Gordonier) 
3 22 4 Sesse ( Mt Pleasant) 3:22 5. 5. 
Scott (Gordonier) 3 23 

880 yd Run Boys 

) Kassetl (Harrison) 3 11; 2 Poiter 
(Hayti) 3 12; 3 Birdmooser (Ml 
Pleasant) 3 13 4 Blount (Harrison) 

3 21, 3 Wise (Merriman) 3:22. 
zgrade 5 

t Walker (Romulus El) 2 ; S2 ; 2 
Aaibcrgsbury (Harnson) 2:53; 3. Jet- 
terson (Beverly) 2:57. 4 Sullivan 
( Merriman) 2 58; 5 Mav (Gordonier) 
3 0$ 


Grade 4 

) Heiti (Merriman) 2 S3: 2 Keller 
(Cory) 2 59. 3 Jarrell (Gordonier) 3:01 ; 

4 Gthnski (Romulus El.) 3 07; 5. 

Bennett ((Cory) 3 08 

Long Jump ■ Girls 
Grade 4 

1 Johnson (Beverly) 9'6' i”; 2. Cot- 
thinham (Hayti); 3 Hopee (Romulus 
El); 4 Trosin (Merriman) ; 5. Summers 
(Hayti) 

Grades 

I Pseitstiker (Romulus El.) 11* 2 ' a"; 

2 Phillips (Mt Pieasani) ,3 Flannery 
(Romulus El ); 4 Brown (Beverly); 5. 
Havermck (Cory). 

Grade 4 

I Hearst (Beverly) IV 6 1 j"; 2. 
Johnson (Beverly). 3 Pitts (Romulus 
El). 4 Jermdan (Hayti); 5. Ferigla 
(Cory). 

Long Jump Boys 
Grade 4 

l Powers (Romulus El.) 12* 0"; 2. 
Hargroves (Beverly); 3. Abbott (Gor- 
donier) ; 4. Haloatter (Hayti); 5 Beattie 
(Merriman). 

Grade S 

I. Johnson (Beverly) 12* l’*"; 2- 
Young (Beverly) ; 3. Morgan (Hayti); 4. 
Barcgeasy (Merriman); 5 Ortolan 
(Hayti) 

Grade 6 

1 Courtney (Romulus Ell 12* 0"; 2. 
Dombtnski ( Mt. Pleasant) ; 3 Powell 
(Beverly); 4. Stevens (Hayti); 5. Mc- 
Crane (Romulus El.). 

Tug-ot War 
Grade 4 

1 Cory; 2. Beverly; 3. Romulus El; 4. 
Hayti 

Grade 5 

1 Cory; 2. Hayti; 3. Romulus El.; 4. 
Beverly 

Grade 6 

1. Cory; 2. Mt Pleasant; 3. Romulus 
El. ; 4 Beverly. 

South sets date 
for physicals 

Kimball and cross country 
physicals for boys from the 
South Junior High School in 
Belleville < eighth and ninth 
grades > will be held at the 
offices of Dr. John Mac- 
Dormid located across from 
I he Belleville Senior High 
School on W. Columbia Ave. 

The physicals will be at 10 
a m. on Thursday. July 13. 
The charge for the physicals is 
S2 


Romulus Softball 

Standings 

East 

Team 

W 

L 

Coughlin Air 

9 

2 

Morgan Manor 

9 

2 

Romulus ProgressiveClub 

8 

2 

Baum s Funeral Home 

5 

S 

Hal's Market 

3 

8 

KerrMtg Co 

3 

8 

Romulus Press Repair 

0 

1) 

West 

Spearman s Fme Foods 

11 

0 

Carpentry by Woodcraft 

7 

4 

Reel Realty 

6 

5 

Romulus Hardware & Auto Supply 

5 

6 

V/aiter s Bar 

5 

6 

Romulus Welding 

5 

6 

Cue Corners 

0 

11 


*************************** 



And then there w’as one. 
Spearman’s Fine Foods 
remain as the lone undefeated 
team in the Romulus loop. The 
Western leaders bested Reel 
Really 4 lo 2 on Tuesday, led 
hv Wally Goeckel’s solo 
homer. Then, on Thursday 
Spearman’s rapped 23 singles 
and 2 doubles to win a hitter’s 
battle 15 to 11 over Romulus 
Progressive Club 
Progressive supplied the 
long ball with home runs from 
Bill Rieber and Ken Mein- 
tkiewicz. triples from Ron 
Dick and Jim Halcomb, and a 
double from Hugh Miller in 
their 17 hit total. 

Twitchel had a perfect day 
at the plate for Spearman’s 
with four singles and a double 
in five trips, scored twice and 
batted in five runs. 

Darwin Wesscl collected 
four hits in five appearances 
and scored four runs. Richard 
Kokila recorded his 1 1th win of 
the season while Bob Zygai 
absorbed his 2nd loss to bring 
his record to 4 and 2. 

Progressive’s second 
baseman John Sterling string 
of nine errorless games was 
ended as he was charged with 
an error for leaving second to 
soon on a force play in making 
his relay to first. Sterling had 
48 chances in his nine game 
string. 

Progressive Club defeated 
Romulus Press Repair 4 to 2 
Tuesday when Bill Reiber 
homered with mate John 
Sterling aboard by way of a 
single in ihe sixth to break up 
a 2 to 2 tie. 

Press Repair led twice in 
the early going, in the top of 
the first* Rich Dibble’s single 
chased Paul Finch home from 
second 

Progressive tied it in the 
bottom half of the frame when 
Fred Eberline singled Sterling 
home from third. Rich Godell 
drove Buddy Ward home from 
second in the fourth with a 
single lo give Repair the lead 
again 

Progressive tied it in their 
half when Ken Meintkiewicz 
scored on Ron Dick’s sacrifice 
fly. Bob Maronen picked up 
his fourth win of the season in 
the contest. 


Morgan Manor moved into a 
tie for first place in the East 
by winning a pair during the 
week. Morgan rallied for five 
runs in the last of the 6th in- 
ning Tuesday to end Coughlin 
Air’s nine game strak. 

Trailing 9 to 7 Morgan 
pulled it out with their big 
sixth frame. Ross Holm drove 
in the lying run and Greg 
Brothers knocked in the 
winner. Dave Pichan singled 
home two insurance runs to 
cap the rally. 

Greg Brothers, Ron Jones. 
Joe Kusibab and Ross Holm 
each had 3 hits to lead 
Morgan’s 22 hit assault. 

Morgan again used late in- 
ning heroics Thursday to pull 
out a 9 to 8 win over Walter’s 
Bar With two out in the 7th 
winning pitcher Ray Muck 
singled in Greg Johnson with 
the lying run. Muck scored the 
w inning run on Joe Kusibab’s 
hit. Pete Molnar, Greg 
Johnson and Joe Kusibab each 
collected three hits, while 
Greg Brothers had a pair. 
Morgan’s hit total was 17 
while Ray Muck allowed 
Walters 14 hits. 

Reel Realty extended 
Coughlin’s losing streak to two 
Thursday with a 5 to 2 win. 
Chuck Hazen came on in relief 
and was tagged with the loss, 
his /second of the week. 
Coughlin’s double loss 
tightened up the Eastern race 
with three teams tog jammed 
at the top. Morgan and 
Coughlin at 9 and 2 and 
Progressive a half game back 
at 8 and 2. 

Baum's Funeral Home and 
Hal’s Market swapped the 
lead several times and went 
nine innings where a two run 
homer by Baum’s Pete 
Bergeron broke up the game. 
Hal’s had grabbed the lead in 
the top of the ninth when Phil 
Mason double chased Roger 
Bird home. 

The final count was Baum’s 
7 Hal’s 6. John Walker had a 
three run homer for Baum’s 
and Rober Bird had a solo 
blast for Hal’s. Ivan Kinshella 
picked up the win. 

Kinshella was on the mound 
again Thursday as Baum’s 
moved past Romulus Hard- 
ware and Auto Supply 9 to 3. 
Alex McCraight had a three- 
run homer for Baum’s. 

Larry Mach hit his fourth 
homer of the year, a tw’o run 
blast, to lead Walter’s Bar in a 
17 to 7 romp over Cue Corners. 
Dick Marshal recorded the 
victory 

Carpentry by Woodcraft 
executed three double plays 
behind Jerry Kittle to defeat 
Kerr Mfg Co. 7 to 6 Tuesday. 




O O 


wc Will pick up your television set. bring it to 
our shop and have it checked by our Tv experts 
You will men be noM>ed by telephone o« the cost 
of repair It you decide not to r*ve It repaired, 
we will return »t to your home All for only l? 


With this ad only) 


TERMS AVAILABLE OR 

USE 
YOUR 

31615 Michigan Ave. 729-3040 


INSTALLATION 
AVAILABLE 
FILTER REPAIR 


*************** 


******** 



31615 Michigan Ave. 
Wayne 

Phone: 729-3040 




Wednesday. July 5, 1972 



More of... 


Page B-3 


Our readers write 

Teacher ‘on her own’ in classroom assault 


ON THE BRIDGE — Captain Morris Samuels (left) and 
Panax Corporation President John P. McGoff are shown on 
the bridge of the Panax ship named after McGoff. Captain 

Panax ship 
to transport 
own newsprint 


Samuels is a citiien of the Public of Honduras. This is his first 
trip into the Great Lakes, which he finds “very interesting 
and busy compared to sailing in the Caribbean. “ 


EAST LANSING— Panax 
newspapers have acquired 
their own ocean - going ship to 
transport newsprint from a 
Canadian mill down the Great 
Lakes for their 23 newspapers 
in Michigan. 

Jhn P McGoff, president of 
Panax, said the ship will haul 
10.000 tons of newsprint this 
year from Thunder Bay. Ont., 
to lower Michigan ports this 
year. 

“Under ideal conditions 
we ll be able to make five trips 
a month/' he said. “In future 
years we ll be transporting on 
our own ship a greater portion 
of the 30.000 tons we need for 
our presses. “ 

The 158-foot ship with a 29- 
foot beam was bought in 
March by Panax Shipping 
Ltd . a wholly-owned foreign 
subsidiary corporation of 
Panax Mark-T McKee Jr. is 
general manager of the 
shipping firm. 

The name of the ship, built 
in 1958 in Leer, Germany, for 
the Dutch coastal trade and 
converted into a package 
freighter for Caribbean 
markets in 1965. was changed 
from the Rotha Lynn to the 
John P McGoff by the Panax 
board of directors. 

It has a gross tonnage of 
469 85 and a cargo capacity of 
600 tons. It can make the 530- 
mile trip down from the Fort 
William mill of Abitibi Paper 
Co. in 60 hours 


Michigan Farm 


for the 
Bureau 
\Mci unloading, the ship 
headed for Thunder Bay on its 
first pickup of newsprint for 
the presses of Panax. 

Tiie ship is under the 
command of Capt Morris M. 
Samuels. 46. who has sailed 
the Caribbean for 39 years and 
who was given his first 
command 18 years ago. 

His wife, Trudy, is making 
the first trips in Great Lakes 
waters aboard the ship. They 
have a home at Cape 
Canaveral, Fla., near Cocoa 
Beach 

“It’s a nice ship,” she said. 
It rides the water well. But 
the Great Lakes can be rough. 
Even the Seaway pilot 
assigned to us was seasick 
The ship carries an all- 
Honduran crew- of io in ad- 
dition to Capt. Samuels. 



JOHN P M r GOFF 

GEORGE TOWN M 
CAYMAN ISLANDS 

f lfe« 



Tin* mill is at the lakehead 
of Lake Superior and the route 
southbound will be through the 
locks into Lake Huron and on 
to lower Michigan ports, 
principally Port Huron 

"Most of the tonnage we 
haul will be our own during the 
Great Lakes shipping 
season," McGoff said. 
“During the lime The lakes are 
closed, the ship will work 
freight charters in t lie 
Caribbean.” 

The John P McGoff arrived 
in Michigan for the first time 
June 23 with a call at Bay City 
with a cargo of binder twine 


POOL 

CHEMICALS 


Panax published seven daily 
newspapers 8 including the 
Daily Eagle — and 16 weeklies 
- including the Belleville 
Enterprise and Romulus 
Roman in Michigan. The 
company also operates two 
large web-offset printing 
plants in Detroit and Mason 
and a printing machinery 
sales and distribution 
company in Kalamazoo. 

The other newspapers are 
the Mining Journal, of 
Marquette; the Escanaba 
Daily Press, the Iron Moun- 
tain News, the Macomb Daily. 
Mount Clemens; the Alma 
Daily Record - Leader and the 
Mr Pleasant Daily Times • 
News. 

The other weekly 

newspapers are the Melius 
Newspapers group and the 
News Herlad group in 
downriver Detroit 


PANAX ACQUISITION — A new entrv in the fleet of ships 
which sail the Great Lakes is the John P. McGoff. Named 
after the president of Panax Corporation, the ship is in 
primary trade between Thunder Bay. Ont.. and various 
Michigan ports. Main cargo is newsprint for the Panax 
newspapers. The vessel, which sails under British 
registration (not flag), has George Town In the Cayman 
Islands as a home port. Plans call for the ship to transport 
cargo in the Caribbean during the winter months when the 
Great Lakes are closed to shipping. 

Schoolcraft names 
Bogarin registrar 


Russell S. Bogarin of Yp 
silanli. director of financial 
aids and placement at 
Schoolcraft College for the 
past four years, has been 
appointed registrar. 

President C. Nelson Grote 
announced the appointment at 
the June 28 Board of Trustees 
meeting 

Rogarin succeeds Norman 


Tourney deadline nears t 

A.-n. j , ... 


Are you registered for table 
tennis? 

Well the deadline for 
registering in the table tennis 
tournament being sponsored 
bv the Van Buren Township 
summer program is Tuesday, 
h>r 15-year-olds and under arid 
July 17 for adults. 

The junior table tennis 


program will be held at the 
North Junior High School, 
while the adults will compete 
at Belleville High School 

For further details, call 
William A Lloyd, director of 
the summer recreation 
program, at the township hall 
941 043 4 


E Dunn, who retired this year 
from the* post he had held 
since Hie college was founded. 

lhc registrar is responsible 
hr conducting registration 
.ifid for maintaining all official 
student records He deter- 
mines grade-point averages 
evaluates credits for 
graduation and program 
completion, prepares official 
transcripts and conducts 
lollow up studies on those who 
transfer to senior colleges. 


Bogarin entered the 
profession in 1956. He has been 
a counselor at Schoolcraft. 
Eastern Michigan University 
Lincoln Consolidated 
School in Ypsilanti. and was 
guidance director for the Van 
Boren Public Schools. 



Of 

It-Gd. 

jf 1 

■ Case 


W Lot 

ONE 

STOP 

POOL 

CENTER 

31615 Michigan Ave. 

729 

3040 


THE SALT TRUCK COMETH... 



If summer comes can 
winter be far behind? 

And that means rust and 
corrosion from salt shorten- 
ing the life of your beautiful 
new car unless, of course, 
Ziebart gets there first 
Do it when your car is new & 
we'll give you a 5 year 
guarantee in writing 
ACT NOW before the salt 
truck comes 1 


30243 MICHIGAN 
AT HENRY RUFF 


729-9700 


RANDY'S 



To the editor; 

The Romulus Education Association (REA) is providing 
legal and financial aid to a system teacher who was allegedly 
assaulted by a parent. 

Slowly emerging from the depths of our education 
bureaucracy are facts and opionions surrounding the alleged 
assault on a kindergarten teacher by a parent in one of the 
Romulus elementary schools. 

The alleged assault occured June 14, two days before 
school was dismissed for the summer. Apparently, ad- 
ministrative officials of the school system overlooked the 
incident, hoping the air would clear during summer 
dismissal. 

The alleged assault took place in front of a class of kin- 
dergarten students by the parent who walked into the class, 

Articles praised 

To the editor: 

Just want to take this opportunity to express our sincere 
appreciation for the excellent job you did on the write-up for 
Meadow Brook Condominiums last weekend. 

All of us were very pleased with the wording and the pic- 
ture We also had a lot of other people who remarked about 
the nice advertisement. 

From all of us thanks again for a job well dk>ne. 

Landy W. Box 
255 Main St. 

Belleville 

Liquor license 
OK’d for lounge 

alloted the township three new 
Gass C liquor licenses due to 
population increase in the 
township as reflected in 1970 
in the U.S. census. 


The issuance of a Gass C 
Liquor license to Louis A. Toth 
of 44119 Harmony Lane by the 
Michigan Liquor Control 
Commission has been ap- 
proved and recommended by 
the Van Buren Township 
Board 

Toth, former Van Buren 
Township supervisor, 
proposes to construct cocktail 
lounge and restaurant on the 
southwest corner of Denton 
Road and the south service 
drive of the 1-94 Expressway. 

The Michigan Liquor 
Control Commission has 


Plans and architectural 
drawings of the “Mr. T’s” 
cocktail lounge and restaurant 
have been approved by the 
building department and to 
the township board. 

A petition to rezone the 
proposed 5. 36-acre site from 
residential to commercial is 
before the township planning 
commission. 


Six bids received 


Six bids have been received 
by the Romulus City Council 
for l he installation of a multi- 
purpose court in Romulus’ 
Kennedy Park. 

This proposals, opened at 
last week’s city council 
session, ranged from a low of 
$5.986 76lo a high of $13,121.37. 

The R.C. Bumstead Asphalt 
Paving of 2145 Hannan Rd., 
Westland, submitted the low' 
hid of $5,986.76. 


The council deferred formal 
action on awarding the con- 
tract pending a report from 
the city’s recreation depart- 
ment and city engineer on the 
type of prior work by the firm, 
which submitted the low bid. 

The contract, when awar- 
ded. will call for 1,667 square 
yards with one-inch asphalt 
base 31. a surface course and 
500 lineal feet of asphaltic 
curb. 


Hauling junk cars 
poses road hazard 


Van Buren Township Police 
Commissioner Dominick W. 
Blend, who also is a member 
•»f the township board, has 
been asked by the board to 
investigate reported problems 
involving trucks transporting 
dismantled vehicles to and 
land fill from Huron Valley 
Steel Corp. on Huron River 
Drive 

Building Inspector Darryl 
Robson reported that trucks 
carrying the dismantled 
vehicles do not secure the 
vehicles properly and the 
trucks loaded with fill are not 
covered as required by law. 

lie icjiortcft that vehicles 
are dragged on bare wheels 


ruining pavement. Glass 
reportedly falls to the road on 
every bump, while parts and 
debris fall onto the road and 
cars also fall off the trucks. 

“Not only is the condition 
very hazardous, but the litter 
creates a very unsightly 
condition,” he said. 

“I have personnally stopped 
these trucks to warn them of 
the violations, but they con- 
tinue. Perhaps if they w r ere 
ticketed several times, the 
situation would cease,” 
R»»bson added. 

lie requested the township 
board ( 0 suggest a solution to 
this “hazardour and unsightly 
problem.” 


grabbed the teacher by the throat, leaving visible hand 
marks, and threatened her When reported to the ad- 
ministration that day, the teacher was advised to wait for an 
opinion from the superintendent's office concerning what 
eg;U action could be taken. Friday the administration told 
the teacher that she was “on her own” in seeking legal 
recourse for the alleged attack. K 

1116 parent was assured by school officials that no action 
would be taken against her by the school system. 

n < \ leach ,? r filed a Po^ce report and posted bond 
in the 34th District Court. 

The REA deplores those board policies which leave its 
membership open to uncontested attacks. A “fit 0 f rage” is 
not just cause for assaulting a teacher in front of 30 im- 
pressionable five-year-old kindergarten students 
The REA will support teachers who are attacked It is 
unfortunate that this is being done by the REA instead of 
system administrative members, who will not accept the 
responsibility for attacks on their employees. 

David Ferdon, 
REA Representative 

Gun owners are tired 
of getting all flack 

To the editor: 

♦i li 66 ] n af ? in Saying we gun owners are getting sick and 
tired of flack coming our way since the attempt on Governor 
Wallace s life. Every time some unbalanced person commits 
a crime with a gun, the sportsman is made to look as if he was 
responsible. 

Let 's really take a look at what gun control laws have done 
so far States with strict gun laws have a somewhat higher 
crime rate than states with more lenient laws. 

The statement is made that murders are committed by 
people who have been in trouble, the facts arethat 80 per cent 
of arrests for homicides are of people with records of crimes 
and violence. It s claimed that ownership of a handgun is no 
protection against a criminal, yet a considerable percentage 
of the homicides in Detroit, for example, were justifiable 
Licensing and registration of firearms will help solve 
crimes and prevent criminals from obtaining guns In the 

r? S !J.°J e ? r V i , X crimes have been solved ‘he entire 
United States by licensing and registration. Most states do 
have some form of registration. 

There is only one conclusion: The responsible citizen obeys 
the law, the criminal could care less. They steal their guns 
We gun owners don ’t want to carry our handguns to work or 
when we go out in the evening, we don’t want to escort our 
chiWren to school with a rifle or shotgun. What we do insist on 
is being able to transport them to a target range or hunting 
area without being harassed at every step. 

We insist on being able to buy ammunition and reloading 
components without having to fill out a form that conflicts 
with our constitutional rights. 

We insist on the right to own a hand gun for sport as well as 
protection. We insist that the federal and state government 
begin to listen to us and realize we have the same rights 
inder the constitution as every other citizen. 

I ve had it from these groups who know nothing about 
firearms except to bleat, “Guns are made to kill” or ”if the 
deer could shoot back, you wouldn’t be so brave”. 

Are the anti-gun, anti-hunting groups ready to pay the bill 
for conservation in this country? We have paid it all so far 
without their help. 

These same groups are for abolishing jails as criminal 
punishment, yet their goal is to disarm America. If you don’t 
turn in your gun. you go to jail for 10 years and get a $10,000 
fine. Their ambivilence amazes me. 

TTie argument is given that the second Amendment is 
outdated. How can this be? It was written at thesame time as 
the others. 

Since it appear we are in for another round of attempts to 
downgrade the Second Amendment, let's get the record 

firearms N ° m ° re compromises from those of us who own 

1 can only say in closing, ‘-The anti-gun groups may not like 
us , but they sure as hell have to live with us 1 ' 

S.K. Pullen 
Belleville 


Organizational 
meeting set 

The organizational meeting 
of the Huron School District 
Board of Education will be 
held at 8 p.m. Monday, School 
Superintendent Byron K 
Antcliff announced 

The meeting will be held in 
the Hannan Road Elementary 
School. 18955 Hannan Road, 
New Boston. 


SOCIALITES 

SHOES 

for 

WOMEN 

121 W. MICH. AVFT. 
HU 2-5561 
YPSILANTI 



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How to get 
around after 
you get away, 


Perfect for everyone in the family. Two great models 
The automatic clutch three-speed CT-70 The hand clutch 
tour-speed CT-70H. Easy to pack. A cinch to ride. 
The USDA-approved spark arrestor/muffler protects you 
Get In to our place. Get away to the country. Then 
get around on the new Hand Trail 70. 

W* big fneogh io give you the price yet »mall 
enough »o qive you the tetvice 

941-1912 

MOTOR CO ) 60 1 8 Huron River Drive 
Romulus 

SUMMER HOURS IN EFFECT: 

Monday. Tuesday Thursday, Fnday 9 a m to 8 p m 
Wednesday 9am to 6 p m Saturday 9 o.m. to 5 p m 


The Suzuki GT- 750 . 

It gets competition 
hot trying to keep up. 

This is the. first really new hike m over *10 
years. A 3-cylinder, 2-stroke that's inner coolal 
for greater and more consistent performance 
67 h p/6 500 rpnv 1 1 5-120 mph 4 pipes * carbs 
5 speeds. CCI automatic lube Electric starter 
5-way adjustable rear shocks 
Does the 1/4 mile in 12 6 Get 
hot; get a GT-750 And s,n SUZUKI 
goodhve to competition 

‘1549* 



SUZUKI* ANN ARBOR 


4040 WASHTENAW AT U.S. 23 

2 BLOCKS EAST OF ARBORLAND 
OPEN 9-9 MON. - FRI. 9714210 




Page B-4 


A PAN AX PUBLICATION- 


Wednesday, July 5. 1972 


Post lamp 
guides visitors 


If guests grope and stumble 
up to the front door, they may 
be wondering if the visit is 
worth the trouble It's better 
to provide a yard lamp, easily 
constructed of western woods. 

Extending hospitality 
further, house numbers on the 
narrow two-foot high faces of 
a series of 2x4s set in the 


ground adjacent to the post 
lamp will make it easier for 
visitors to find the right house. 

Plans for a post lamp and 
other outdoor projects are 
available for 15 cents in coin 
from The Daily Eagle. 35540 
W Michigan Ave . Wayne, 
Mich . 48184, in care of the 
Home Improvements Editor 


What’s new 
on the market? 


What's new on the market? 

THE PRODUCT — A 74* 
inch circular saw with a series 
of safety features. 

The manufacturer’s claim— 
That the saw' has double-in- 
sulated construction and in- 
corporates an on-off switch 
button that must be pressed 
before the trigger can be 
pulled, making accidenta 
starts almost impossible 
that a blade guard lift lever is 
located between the handle 
and the upper blade guard so 
that it is not necessary to 
reach across the front of the 
saw to lift the guard when 
making pocket cuts that a 
guard stop prevents the blade 
guard from being elevated too 
high and exposing an ex- 
cessive amount of blade and 
that the 24*horsepow'er motor 
is designed to withstand 
frequent overloads caused by 
continuous cutting. 


Planning 

quartet 

renamed 


THE PRODUCT - Shutters 
made of rigid vinyl bonded to 
a preservative-treated wood 
subfrane 

The manufacturer’s claim— 
that the shutters require no 
painting ... that they are 14 
inches thick. allowing 
authentic detailing of rails, 
stiles, paners and louvers 
that a simulated wood grain 
formed in vinyl adds to a 
realistic appearance and 
texture ... that the shutters 
come in 14 and 18-inch widths, 
in 10 height sizes ranging from 
35 to 75 inches, plus 80 inches 
for exterior doors ... that they 
are available in panel or 
louver styles in white vinyl or 
factoryapplied black acrylic 
... and that predrilled black 
hinges permit fast, easy in- 
stallation. 


Four members of the city’s 
nine-member City Planning 
'Commission have been 
reappointed by Belleville City 
Council. The reappointments 
were recommended by Mayor 
Royce E. Smith. 

The four Belleville 
residents, who will serve new 
two-year terms, are Mrs. 
Helen Beasecker. Joseph 
Moon, Theodore G. Hooten 
and Virgil Lockrow. 

The city council also 
reappointed Samuel Morris 
and Robert Baker, both of 
Belleville, to the city’s elec- 
trical board, which has the 
authority to revoke the license 
of electrical contractors 
operating within the city 
limits. 


THE PRODUCT — A twin- 
head orbital-action polisher- 
sander. 

The manufacturer’s claim— 
That the one-third horsepower 
machine closely ap- 
proximates hand sanding but 
is 250 times faster ... that the 
twin heads counter balance, 
giving a completely stable 
operation ... that the machine 
sands, fills, feathers, finishes 
and polishes metals and paints 
... that it weighs only 8 pounds 
because the handle, motor 
housing and other exterior 
parts are made of finished 
cast aluminum. 

(For either of Andy Lang’s 
helpful booklets, ’‘Wood 
Finishing in the Home’’ and 
“Paint Your House Inside and 
Out,” send 30cents and a long, 
stamped self-addressed enve- 
lope to Know-How', P.O. Box 
477, Huntington, N. Y. 11743. 
Be sure to specify which 
booklet you want.) 

(The circular saw r is manu- 
factured by J. C. Penney. 1301 
Avenue of the Americas, New 
York, N. Y. 10019; the shutters 
by Andersen Corp.. Bayport, 
Minn, 55003, and the polisher- 
sander by Cyclo Manufac- 
turing Co., 3816 Dahlia St., 
Denver, Colo. 80201. 


Take the 
work out of 
yard care. 



12 hp Model 1256 


fo* '.tr- ,i 


: At.. i tc l'^T 


Over 600 lbs. of automation That's the Husky 1256 - 
a tractor that does all the work while you go along for 
the ride Footpedal forward reverse leaves your hands 
free to steer or to operate the hydraulic lift lever 
Accept over three dozen year round attachments Has 
balanced traction for soft terrain, lots of safety features 
and a 12 h p engine See them today 1 


WILLIAM F. SELL & SON 


16555 Telegraph Road 
Taylor 

Phone 282-5100 


19162 Huron River Drive 
New Boston 
Phone 753-4340 




IMRR 





Homeowners can learn 
how to foil burglars 


NIGHT LIGHT — This yard light or 4-by-4-inch wood post 
combines with the house numbers on row of 2-by-4s to guide 
visitors to right door in the dark. 


Don’t let someone 
else pick hammer 




Don’t send your wife or your 
husband or your son or your 
friend to buy a hammer for 
you. 

It might sound far out, but a 
hammer is an individual thing 
which should “fit” the user. In 
choosing a hammer, grasp it 
firmly near the end of the 
handle and move it around a 
little. It should feel comfort- 
able. If it doesn’t, try others— 
of different sizes and shapes— 
until you find one that seems 
made to order just for you. 
True, you can use almost any 
hammer and probably get 
good results, but using one 
that suits you will reduce arm 
fatigue. 

Banged fingers, bent nails 
and marred surfaces make it 
evident that using a hammer 
properly .isn’t the simple task 
it seems to be. For one thing, a 
hammer should be held down 
at the end of the handle 
without any of your hand 
overhanging. The weight of 
the hammer head is then free 
to move by the force of gravity 
as you swing the handle. 

Rest the face of the hammer 
on the nail, draw the hammer 
back and give a light tap to 
start the nail and to determine 
the aim. Strike the nail 
squarely as you hold it in place 
with the thumb and first two 
fingers of one hand. Besides 
getting you started properly, 
this first light tap prevents 
any serious damage to your 


hand should you fail to hit the 
target. 

Hammer blows are struck 
with the wrist, the elbow and 
the shoulder. For light taps, 
use only the wTist. For moder- 
ate blows, use the wrist and 
the elbow. For heavy whacks, 
use the wrist, elbow and the 
shoulder. 

Should a nail bend while 
hammering it, you are much 
better off to withdraw it and 
start a new one than to at- 
tempt to striaghten it with 
compensating blows. In very 
rough work, however, striking 
it at a slant to straighten it out 
is all right. Hitting it straight 
on or at a slant, always strike 
the nail with the center of the 
hammer face. 

In withdrawing a nail, slip 
the claw- of the hammer under 
the nail head and pull the 
handle toward you. Do not 
draw it past a vertical 
position, if the nail proves 
stubborn, place a piece of 
wood under the head of the 
hammer to increase the 
leverage and relieve unnec- 
essary strain on the handle. 

When a nail is to be driven 
below the surface, use a nail 
set for the last two or three 
blows. Nail sets are in- 
expensive, so keep two or 
three different sizes in your 
workshop to take care of nail 
heads of different diameters. 



Playing cops and robbers is 
not a game with big city police 
these days. They are using a 
plan that makes it harder for 
house burglars to do their 
thing w'ith finesse. This 
vacation season should be a 
good test for householders. 

A success in Monterey Park, 
Calif . where the plan— Oper- 
ation Identification— began in 
1963, it is operating in 75 other 
cities, and was just adopted by 
Connecticut for 85 towns under 
state police jurisdiction The 
householder’s protection lies 
in marking his possessions 
with an engraving tool, listing 
his valuables and wearing a 
sticker on his house or 
apartment. 

In Connecticut, information 
on losses and identifying num- 
ber— a driver’s license num- 
ber— is teletyped to the 
National Crime Information 
Center in Washington D C., an 
FBI-operated computer 
center into which state and 
local police agencies are tied 
In larger cities, such as New 
York, where the plan is now 
being formulated. Social 
Security or other numbers 
might be used 
With the number etched on 
possessions— silver. fishing 
rods, bicycles, stereos, tele- 
vision-police can trace 
owners within minutes, and 
while the idea is not 
foolproof— some robbers may 
re-etch numbers— it will 
certainly give a robber a new 
slant on his taking ways and 
make a fence think twice. 

Even in areas where such a 
program has not begun, 
householders might mark 
items of value, in the event of 
li*eir loss, one can turn the 
number over to the police. 

Etching tools have needle- 
like points and are handled 
like pencils. In marking items, 
care should be taken to mark 
certain numbers— 3, 6, 9 — so 
thev can not easily be turned 
into eights. In Connecticut, 
engraving kits are being 
loaned by police, and 
elsewhere they may be rented. 
When the tool is returned, a 
sticker is issued A 
householder can fill out a form 
listing valuables and turn it 
over to the police where it will 
be kepi in a confidential file. 
Or a wife may prefer to keep 
the list at a bank at her hus- 
band’s office 

A sticker states that all 
goods of value are registered 
with law- - enforcement 
agencies. Police feel it is a 
great deterent. if placed 
where it can be seen outdoors 
or on an apartment door. 

The plan may also result in 
insurance premium reduc- 
tions. One company. The 
Hartford, has just announced 
a 10 per cent reduction on 
homeowner’s policies for 
those policyholders meeting 
requirements of Connecticut’s 
state police program. 

In this high - burglary area, 
going on vacation has been 
“like abandoning ship with a 
heavy cargo/’ But some 
burglars will find a way, no 
matter what Encouraging 
though are statistics gathered 
in Monterey Park during the 
decade the plan has been in 


this summer let 
Allis’Chalmers handle the work 
...you handle the fun! 

Finish yardwork fast and neat and take off to where the 
fun is You can tackle anything from back lot to stadium 
with an Alhs-Chalmers lawn and garden tractor 6 to 14 
hoursepower Add on versatility is available in minutes 
with a complete lineup of accessories to handle mowing 
grading, plowing, hauling, snow throwing and 
much more Stop in and look them over today 


‘’“KSS 


A 


Coy Kendall 

FLOWERS INC. 

43340 Bemis Rd. Belleville 
Phone 697-9173 


ucts 


progress. Of the 4,000 homes in 
the plan, only six have been 
burglarized whereas 1,800 of 
the 7.000 not protected have 
been broken into. 

These days the loot “is any- 
thing that can be sold,” says 
Sgt. Robert Rasmussen of the 
Hartford. Conn., State Police. 
Favored items are stereos, 
cameras, watches, jewelry, 
silverware. 

It is comforting to know that 
stolen possessions might be 
returned, but heirlooms and 
other articles of sentimental 
value that cannot be replaced 
might be stashed in a safe 
place after they are number 
etched. Bank vaults are safe 
places for jewelry and 
documents: relatives might 


store silver; neighbors might 
be persuaded to hold your 
prize paintings while you are 
away. 

In foiling vacation rob- 
beries. avoid calling attention 
to vacation plans. If it must 
be .a car should be serviced at 
the local garage before it is 
packed to the hilt w'ith suit- 
cases. And if one owns a 
house, one shouldn’t suddenly 
change the environmental 
pattern from shaggy cluttered 
to neat stylish. 

Even with the best-laid 
plans a disconnected 
telephone is often a thief’s 
tipoff. Many thieves check 
telephones day and night for 
days before they visit your 
house. An answering service 


might provide some protec- 
tion with a noncommittal, 
“hello,’’ giving the impression 
someone is at home. 

You can stash away heir- 
looms, your identifiable 
possessions and police-label 
your door or window, but a 
frustrated thief may feel 
obliged to take a little 
something “so it shouldn't be 
a total loss ’’ One family ob- 
liges would-be burglars by 
scattering about clothing that 
has been earmarked for 
charity, and putting in full 
view, bulky items they are 
trying to unload anyway— an 
old typewriter, television, 
radio. It may just deter a 
burgar from carting off your 
porcelain vase. 


Super handyman 


Sanding strip proves 
handy on bench top 


By AL CARRELL 



Dear Al: 

I like lo have a small san- 
ding strip right on top of my 
workbench. It’s a real con- 
venience to be able to reach 
over and smooth edges, 
remove burrs and the like by 
just rubbing the work over a 
flat sanding surface To keep a 
sanding surface in place. 1 cut 
two slits in the edge of the 
bench top. They are positioned 
to accommodate a sanding 
belt The slits are at a slight 
angle to prevent the belt from 
sliding while being used. A 
wedge is placed between the 
belt and the bottom of the 
bench so the belt is sure to 
stay in place. When I want the 
belt moved to provide a new 
surface. I pull out the wedge 
and rotate. 

D.C.E. 

Dear Al: 

Remember the old curling 
irons women used to use on 
their hair° I found one in the 
attic and find it is an excellent 
sanding tool for getting inside 
scroll work and other small 
curves. The abrasive is 
wrapped around the end and 
held there by the clamp that 
used to put the kink in hair. 

D Y. 

Dear Al: 

That heat shrink tape you 
mentioned gave me a great 
idea for an additional use. The 
frayed ends of rope can be 
bound tight and then made 
permanent when the heat 
shrinks the tape I have 
become the hit of the boat club 
by doing this to every line 
(rope) around the place. 

Capt L. 


A super hint — Unless you 
are very experienced, you 
may not be able to look at a 
run of pipe and tell what the 
diameter is. A quick way to 
determine the diameter is to 
clamp an adjustable wrench 
down on the pipe Now 
measure the width the jaws 
are open, and that will give 


you the outside diameter ol 
the pipe 
Dear Al: 

Adapting vour idea of a light 
under a bucket to spot holes, I 
lowered a trouble light into a 
tank and was able to find the 
tiny holes. After soldering, I 
tested my work without filling 
the tank I placed a rubber 
suction cup over the solder 
places. If there was no leak, 
the suction cup stayed If air 
could get through, the suction 
cup fell off after a short wait. 
This was better than finding 
the leaks as the contents of the 
tank oozed out. 

V.K.P. 

Quick answers for harried 
handymen: To R.E.W. — The 
difference between the half- 
priced bottle cutting rigs and 
the real ones is that the 
cheapies are designed to cut 
lightweight, no-return bottles. 
The others are for heavier 
glass, too. Depends on what 
you want to do with this 
popular hobby ToJ.Y. — The 
old-style deck paint of the oil 
base variety is actually more 
resistant to wear than the 
newer latex type. However, 
for use on your concrete patio, 
the moisture from the slab can 
have a bad effect on the oil- 
based enamel. To Mrs. 
T E A. - Wrong! 


A super hint - Moving large, 
thin sheets of plywood or 
paneling can be easier if you 


will clamp several sheets 
together A C-clamp at each 
corner will do the trick. If the 
finish side is out, pad the 
clamp. This allows you to 
make fewer trips and avo»d 
the possible damage. 

Al Carrell welcomes all 
mail, especially tips from 
fellow Handymen which he 
can pass on to readers as 
space permits While he 
cannot answer all individual 
letters, he will try to nail down 
your problem in his column 
whenever possible. 

Some trees 
need shade 
to survive 

Several valuable species of 
softwood trees, such as 
Douglas fir and lodgepole 
pine, grow only in open spaces 
and became dominant cen- 
turies ago in parts of the west 
after devastating fires. 

That’s why proper forest 
management calls for har- 
vesting these trees in a block, 
clearing an opening for 
replanting seedlings of the 
shade-intolerant species. 

The mature wood is har- 
vested for use by man, rather 
than allowing nature to clear 
it wastefully by fire, disease, 
windstorm or insects. 


Patio screens 
blunt breezes 


Blunting strong winds while 
keeping a cooling breeze on 
deck or patio can be ac- 
complished with handsome 
screens easily built of western 
woods 

i 


TRANSIT MIXED CONCRETE 

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for 

• General Construction 

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a supply 

COMPANY 


AMERMAN LUMBER 

“Your Cash -way Lumber Center” 

■ PHONE 1 270 SOUTH LIBERTY ST. I r 3(L I 

1697-91661 BELLEVILLE |stt 7:30 Noon] 


Frames of 4x4-inch western 
pine, fir or cedar, lied in with 
decking or benches, support 
2x2-inch slats on 2x4-inch 
stringers The slightly spaced 
slats allow cooling air to 
circulate. 

Wood screens also can 
provide privacy in front yards 
without appearing 
inhospitable, and can divide 
back vard areas for different 


| Jtaukliu’s 

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ihovsand* of Wallpaper 
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Wednesday . July 5. 1972 


A PANAX PUBLICATION 


Page B-5 





Soil) is proud to announce a giant step backwards Ma\mg started w 1 1 1 1 a modest 19 and 9 inch diagonal 
screen— having progressed to a sizeable 17— Son) now add- a fourth size. .Not a super giant, but a nice, 
medium, comfortable 15. Still 100// solid ?tate. instant ‘up“ picture, and one button automatic color and 
fine tuning. .Also a brand new l HF tuner that homes straight in on each l HF channel with a definite click 
of the dial. But most important^ . compare the picture' with an\ other. 

SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY PRICE 

1480 WASHTENAW 

IN YPSILANTI 

483-9884 

Monday thru Friday 9 to 9 
Saturday 9 to 6 


Jc)igGvyy€s 

teP ME 

IQlPPliance 

MART 

II c (itie Ot»r C.uitumrr « CrrtJii . 

If e Cue Our Cii'lomtr.s Senue 


Quarterly 

report 

issued 

A total of 145 complaints 
have been received and in- 
vestigated by the Romulus 
police chief, according to a 
quarterly report 

The report, presented to the 
Romulus City Council last 
week, showed the police 
chief’s code enforcement 
detail involved 84 inoperable 
motor vehilce investigations, 
and 5fi unkempt premises 
complaints 

Warnings were issued on 57 
complaints investigated and 
m :to other ordinance 
violations, compliance to city 
codes, was obtained by the 
city 

In the investigation of 37 
businesses seeking licenses, 
the police chief reported 
tickets were issued in 15 cases 

Twenty-five complaints 
received by Chief Koch were 
referred to various county 
enforcement agencies 


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TICKETS ON SALE AT 

ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS 
35540 MICHIGAN AVENUE 
WAYNE, MICHIGAN 729-4000 


4 * 

LEARNING HOW TO SWTM — One of the youngsters at- 
tending the beginners swimming class at Belleville High 
School pool receives instructions on properly use of arms and 
legs from an instructor. Participating in the instructional 
swimming program, sponsored by the Van Buren Township 
Recreation Department, are 24 four and five-year-old 
children. 

‘Guppies’ class 

attracts 24 
4-5-year-olds 


SWIMMING CLASS — The 1972 summer recreation 
program, sponsored by the Van Buren Township Recreation 
Department, has varied recreational activities for adults 
and children Instructional swimming held at the Belleville 
High School pool includes a new program caUed "Guppies." 


a beginners class for 4-5-year old children. Class instructors 
(in water) teach the youngsters shown along the pool the 
method of proper kicking when swimming. Two half-hour 
classes are conducted Monday through Friday until July 14. 


Helping Hand shop needs aid 


A new swimming program 
c died 'Guppies.’’ a beginners 
class l*-ing sponosred by the 
Van Buren Township 
Recreation Department, has 
attracted 24 four and five- 
> cai -*»ld township youngsters, 
William Lovd. director of the 
township’s 1972 summer 
recreation program, an- 
nounced. 

Tin* instructional sw imming 
program is conducted at the 

Pack 

presents 

awards 

Cub Scout Pack 793, spon- 
sored by St. Anthony’s 
Catholic School, presented the 
following awards at its recent 
pack meeting: 

Paul Innis received his 
Bobcat pin. Todd Brehmer 
was presented with a Wolf 
gold arrow Joseph Mon- 
fort on. a Citizen badge, and 
Dean McLaughlin received his 
Aquanaut badges, James 
Fusinski, Engineer badge. 
Eugene Copley was presented 
with Artist Geologist and 
Scholar badges and Pal 
McNally got Pat McNally got 
Ins Showman and Scholar 
badges. 

The Arrow of Light award 
was presented to John Allen. 
Paul Elden and Joseph 
Monfort en 

Accepted into the Boy 
Scouts were Paul Elden, 

.John Allen, William Jansen 
and John Delaney. 

The members of the pack 
will attend the Detroit Police 
Review and Field Day to be 
held in Detroit July 8 


Belleville High School pool 
Monday through Friday 
There are two one-half hour 
classes, one at 11-11:30 a m 
and the other at 11:30 to 12 
noon 

The program is under the 
direction of Ben Robertson 
and David Long Both men are 
being assisted by Peggy 
Jarrett and Doug Raymond 

Members of the two classes 
include Jill Pence, Cheryl 
Luebe, Dennis Monlie. Paul 
Przystup.Sam Drukor. Steven 
and Jeffery Memering. Man 
Cullin. Anne Conley, Todd 
Atchinson. Carol Carlson, 
Susan Matthews, Brian 
Goleniak and Michael 
Goleniak 

Other youngsters par- 
ticipating in the swimming 
program are Denis Smith. 
Christine Smith. Kevin 
Greszik. Jack Reed. Donna 
Ferguson. Theresa Davis 
Carol Calloway, Shari and 
Shawn Ferguson and Jana 
Steiger. 


Romulus’ Helping Hand 
Thrift Shop, a volunteer - 
operated shop directed by 
Mrs Florence Kline of 
Romulus ma\ be forced to 
close its doors if financial 
assistance is not received 
from members of the com- 
munity nr elsewhere. 

The shop is located in the 
basement quarters of the old 
Corv Elementary School 
building now the Special 
Services Building of the 
Romulus Community School 
District at 7335 Washington St. 
Romulus The quarters are 
donated by the school district. 

Mis. Kline, who has been 
directing the thrift shop 
operations for the last six 
years without any salary 
compensation, recently ap- 
pealed lo the Romulus City 
Council for assistance. 

Many volunteers have 
assisted in keeping the thrift 
shop in operation during the 
last few years. 

The shop's activities ac- 
cording to Mrs Kline, have 
grown tremendously in the 
last two years by increases in 
case loads, in referrals from 
other agencies <ADC) and 
welfare agencies), and from 
citizens of the city that the 
sh»»p can not continue without 
financial assistance. 

Donations of clothing, food, 
toys and other useful items 
made by various 

Agile animal 

Deer can readily clear an 
obstruction seven feet high. 


organizations in Romulus and 
adjacent communities have 
been distributed to many 
needy families, individual 
adults and children under 


Mrs Kline’s direction. 

The duties at the thrift shop 
are now taking most of her 
time. Mrs. Kline reported, she 
would not be able to continue, 


although she enjoys the work 
and wants to. without some 
sort of financial arrangement 
for herself and the operation 
of the shop 


MICHIGAN 


BIG GEORGE MAKES THE COMPETITION OTHERS TRY TO MEET! 


BIG GEORGE MAKES THE COMPETITION OTHERS TRY TO MEET! 


INTRODUCING 

SONY TRINITRON 


if 

i b 

(Measured Diagonally) 


How G' 


IS on-residency law 


effective Aug. 1 


The Romulus City Council 
has directed Mayor Hyle J 
Carmichael to notify ail city 
employes affected by the 
city’s residency ordinance 
that the deadline for required 
city residency is Aug 1 

The residency ordinance 
was adopted by the city 
council in August, 1970 and 
allowed one year lor the 
employes who were then not 
residents of the city to beside 
in the city or lose of their 
positions in city offices 

Mrs Deanna Lnvenduski. 
deputy city clerk, reported 


Monday that about to em- 
ployes would be dismissed if 
they do not comply wit he 
provisions of the ordinance. 

These employes are scat- 
tered throughout various city 
departments, she said 

Councilman Edmund W. 
Bizek entered the motion to 
have the mayor alert the 
employes. He was supported 
b> Councilman Brooker R 
Edwards 

The motion was 
unanimously approved by the 
city council. 


LOOKING 

FOR AN HONEST DEAL ON A 

NEW or USED CAR? 

THEN YOU'RE LOOKING FOR 

PAUL DORSTEN 

SERBAY 


CHRYSLER PLYMOUTH DAI SUN 


34 E. MICHIGAN AVE 
YPSILANTI 4288850 

P S. WE ALSO HAVE ONE OF 
THE FINEST SERVICE DEPT. 
IN WASHTENAW COUNTY 






Page B-6 


A PANAX PUBLICATION 


Wednesday, July 5, 1972 


Romulus personals 


B\ PKARL MORRIS 
Phone WH-1-1187 

Mr and Mrs. Larry Knight 
of Wayne were visitors last 
Saturday at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. James Kellas and 
family on Walnut Drive The 
women are sisters 


The Ladies Missionary 
Group will hold its regular 
meeting at 10 a m. Thursday 
at the Calvary Baptist Church 
on Ozga Road. 


The Methodist Men’s Club of 
the Romulus and New Boston 
United Methodist Churches 
will hold their regular break- 
fast meeting at 7:30 a.m. 
Sunday in the basement of the 
Romulus church. 


Tin* following Wayne County 
participants w r on certificates 
for project modeled in the 


dress review at the recent 
Country Fair of Yesteryear at 
Greenfield Village: “Young 
Miss ”, Mary Butler, first 
place, (sportswear); Connie 
Mason, second (dress or 
jumper); Lisa Peck, second 
<dress or skirt division). 
“Junior Miss”, Kathy 
Bumbul, third place (sport- 
swear); Sandra Newton, first 
place (dress or jumper and 
blouse); “Senior Miss”, 
Nancy Baker, second place 
(rainwear); Laurie LeFevre, 
third (general dresses); 
Lynette Ritter, third (formal 
wear); Jeannine Wojcik. 
second (sportswear). Ninety- 
four 4-H’ers from six counties 
modeled garments. 


Spending a few days with 
their grandparents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Davis Draper of Elm- 
view Street, are Jennifer 
Draper. 10. and David Draper, 

6. of St. Clair Shores. The 
children’s parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard Draper, are on 
vacation. 


Mr. and Mrs Donald 
Herrmann and son. Geoff, last 
week moved into a remodeled 
farm home at 3740 Labo Road. 
Newport The Herrmanns 
(she’s the former Margie 
Hay> have sold their home on 
West vale Street The new 
owners and residents there 
are Mr. and Mrs. Fred Waibel 
and two sons, formerly of New 
Boston. 


\ County Leaders Meeting 
will be held at the 4-H 
Fairgrounds. Quirk Road. 
Belleville at 7:30 p.m. Mon- 
day. 


Mr. and Mrs. F W. Hay, 
Fred M and Carla of the 
Zephyr Arabian Farm on 
Huron River Drive South and 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Herr- 
man of Newport spent the 
weekend attending the four- 
day Indiana All-Arabian 
Horse Show in Indianapolis. 
Among their achievements 


were three plaques and first 
place blue ribbons in mounted 
native costume (open); 
mounted native costume and 
western pleasure (amateur, 
stallion) They also took a 
reserve championship in 
western pleasure. 


Zephyr Arabians and other 
local Arab horse owners will 
be competing in Michigan on 
July 13—16 at the State 
Fairgrounds in Detroit. This is 
the Michigan All— Arabian 
show. The public is invited to 
attend 

Thwarts holdups 

IRVING. Tex., <AP> — Two 
Irving businessmen are 
putting on the market an 
electronic safe which they 
think can foil holdups at 
grocery stores and service 
stations. 

Charles Williams and Joe 
Arrington say the new device 
is time controlled and 
designed to serve as a safe 
place for a day’s receipts. 






CITY OF ROMULUS 

COUNCIL MINUTES 


MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING OF THE 
ROMULUS CITY COUNCIL HELD ON JUNE 27, 1972. 

The meeting was called to order at 8:10 p.m. by 
Chairman Raspberry. 

Invocation by Reverend John D. Wells, Union Grove 
Baptist Church. 

Attendance roll call showing, 
present: Raspberry, Edwards, Stewart, Oakley, Block, 
Bizek 

absent: none 
excused: Pennington 
Also in attendance: 

Leonard J. Folmar, City Clerk 
Albert Glinski, City Treasurer 

Chuck Heilman, Wade, Trim & Associates - City 
Engineers 

72-395 

2. Motion by Stewart, supported by Oakley, to approve 
the agenda amended. 

1. Roll Call 

2. Agenda 

3. Approval of minutes of June 15, 1972 Regular City 
Council Meeting 

4. Walter Cunningham - Fireworks Display Permit 

5. Michael Molenda representing St. Aloysius Church • 
Fireworks Display Permit 

6. G.E. Wash - Rezoning of property to Multiple, located 
on Ecorse Road 

7. Bid Opening - Multipurpose Court located at Kennedy 
Park 

8. Unfinished Business 

9. Discussion 

10. New Business 

11. Communications 

12. Chairmans Report 

13. Warrants 

14. Adjournment 

Roll call vote showing. Ayes - Stewart, Oakley, Block, 
Bizek, Edwards, Raspberry. Nays - none. Motion carried 
unanimously. 

72-3% 

3. Motion by Bizek, supported by Block, to approve the 
minutes of the June 15, 1972 regular Council Meeting as 
amended, (addition of Chairmans name). Roll call vote 
showing. Ayes - Bizek, Block, Oakley, Stewart, Edwards. 
Nays - none. Abstain - Raspberry. Motion carried 
unanimously. 

72-397 

4. Motion by Edwards, supported by Stewart, to ten- 
tatively approve the request of Walter Cunningham for a 
fireworks display permit, subject to the City Attorneys 
opinion and conformity with State Laws. City Counsel to 
set required amount of insurance or surety. Roll call vote 
showing. Ayes - Edwards, Stewart, Raspberry. Nays - 
Oakley, Block, Bizek. Motion failed. 

72-398 

5. Motion by Bizek, supported by Oakley, to delete 
Michael Molenda until a later date. Roll call vote showing. 
Ayes - Bizek, Oakley, Block, Stewart, Raspberry, Eld- 
wards. Nays - none. Motion carried unanimously. 

72-399 

6. Motion by Oakley, supported by Block, to hold an 
Executive Session with the G.E. Wash Company, 
Romulus Planning Commission, City Attorneys, City 
Engineers on July 6, 1972 at 7:00 p.m. and hold a Public 
Hearing for the rezoning of the property involved on July 
25, 1972 at 7:00 p.m. Roll call vote showing. Ayes - Oakley, 
Block. Bizek, Stewart, Raspberry, Edwards. Nays - none. 
Motion carried unanimously. 

7. No action taken 

72-400 

8. Motion by Block, supported by Oakley, to approve a 
three-year rubbish and garbage contract with American 
Rubbish Company with the addition of a clause stating 
that no sub-contracting can be allowed without prior 
approval from City Council. Roll call vote showing. Ayes - 
Block, Bizek, Stewart, Raspberry, Edwards. Nays - 
Oakley. Motion carried. 

72-401 

Motion by Stewart, supported by Edwards, to concur 
with the recommendation of the City Engineers and sign 
an agreement with the Wayne County Road Commission 
whereby the City will assume jurisdiction of Harrison 
Road between Wick and Hildebrandt. Roll call vote 
showing. Ayes - Stewart, Edwards, Bizek, Block, Oakley, 
Raspberry. Nays - none. Motion carried unanimously. 
72-402 

Motion by Edwards, supported by Stewart, to adopt the 
budget for the City of Romulus for the 1972-1973 fiscal 
year Budget continues millage of 5.5 mills for operation 
and maintenance of City. Roll call vote showing. Ayes - 
Edwards. Stewart, Block, Bizek, Raspberry. Nays - 
Oakley. Motion carried. 

9. No action taken 

72-403 

10 Motion by Oakley, supported by Bizek, to concur 
with the recommendations of Chief Koch, and authorize 
the placing of safety bumper stickers on all City vehicles 
Roll call vote showing Ayes - Oakley, Bizek, Block, 
Stewart, Raspberry. Edwards Nays - none. Motion 
carried unanimously. 

72-404 

Motion by Bizek, supported by Oakley, to direct theCit; 
Engineer to prepare specifications and let bids for the r f ‘ 
surfacing of Grant Road and report back to Councu o. 
July 25. 1972 Roll call vote showing. Ayes - Bizek, Oakley, 
Block, Stewart, Raspberry. Edwards. Nays - none. Motion 
earned unanimously. 


72-405 

Motion by Stewart, supported by Bizek, to adopt 
Resolution No. 72-405. 

RESOLUTION NO. 72-405 

WHEREAS, The Michigan State Legislature has passed 
Public Acts providing for tax exemption for Senior 
Citizens, certain Veterans and Unremarried Widows; 

AND WHEREAS, The forces of inflation have eroded 
their effect drastically. 

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED, That the City of 
Romulus requests that the State Legislature increase the 
property limitation from $10,000.00 to $15,000.00 on the 
State Equalized Valuation to qualify for exemption 
Veterans and Unremarried Widows. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That the City of 
Romulus requests that the State Legislature increase the 
Senior Citizens Veterans and Unremarried Widows 
Homestead Tax Exemption from $2,500.00 assessed 
valuation to $7,500.00 assessed valuation. 

BE IT FINALLY RESOLVED, That a copy of this 
Resolution be sent to Governor William G. Milliken, State 
Senator, William Faust, State Representative Edward 
Mahalak, the Chairman of the Senate and House Taxation 
Committee, and all municipalities in the County of Wayne. 

Roll call vote showing. Ayes - Stewart, Bizek, Rasp- 
berry, Edwards, Block, Oakley. Nays - none. Motion 
carried unanimously. 

72-406 

Motion by Oakley, supported by Block, to grant a no-fee 
tent permit to Reverend Taylor, subject to building 
department approval. Roll call vote showing. Ayes — 
Oakley, Block, Bizek, Stewart, Edwards, Raspberry. 
Nays - none. Motion carried unanimously. 

72-407 

Motion by Stewart, supported by Oakley, to accept with 
regret, Gene Mulberry’s resignation from the Board of 
Appeals and send a letter of commendation for his years 
of service. Roll call vote showing. Ayes - Stewart, Oakley, 
Block, Bizek, Edwards, Raspberry. Nays - none. Motion 
carried unanimously. 

72-408 

12. Motion by Edwards, supported by Stewart, to change 
the date of the next regular Council Meeting from July 4, 
1972 to July 5, 1972. Roll call vote showing. Ayes - Ed- 
wards, Stewart, Block, Bizek, Oakley, Raspberry. Nays - 
none. Motion carried unanimously. 

72-409 

Motion by Bizek, supported by Edwards, that the Mayor 
be directed to notify all employees affected by the 
Residency Ordinance, and alert them of the deadline by 
which they must be residents of the City. Roll call vote 
showing. Ayes - Bizek, Edwards, Raspberry, Stewart, 
Block, Oakley. Nays - none. Motion carried unanimously. 

The Chairman requested the Clerk to notify the Mayor 
that the Urban Renewal Budget for the fiscal year 1972-73 
could not be approved because it has not been received by 
the City Council. 

Motion by Oakley, supported by Stewart, to accept the 
Chairmans Report as presented. Roll call vote showing. 
Ayes - Oakley, Stewart, Block, Bizek, Edwards. Nays - 
none. Abstain - Raspberry. Motion carried. 

72-410 

13. Motion by Edwards, supported by Block, to approve 
Warrant No. 77 and Supplement to Warrant No. 77 in the 
total amount of $320,395.30, Check No. 7457 through Check 
No. 7650 both inclusive with the following deletions. 


No. 7583 M&M Equipment Sales $ 660.00 

No. 7587 Precision Laboratories 297.23 

No. 7497 Dow Jones - Irwin, Inc. 46.06 

No. 7505 Great Lakes Lumber & Supply 500.00 

No. 7507 M.C. Gutherie Lumber Co. 260.00 

No. 7558 A&E Tool Service, Inc. 180.42 

No. 7620 Edwards Plumbing & Heating 725.00 

No. 7650 H R. Horton 2000.00 


Roll call vote showing. Ayes - Edwards, Block, Bizek, 
Stewart, Oakley, Raspberry. Nays - none. Motion carried 
unanimously. 

72-411 

Motion by Bizek, supported by Edwards, to approve 
Urban Renewal Warrant No. 73 in the total amount of 
$110,829.95, Voucher No. 659 through Voucher No. 801 both 
inclusive with the following exclusion. 

No. 768 Urban America Land Development $21,055.38 

Roll call vote showing. Ayes - Bizek, Edwards, Stewart, 
Raspberry. Nays - Oakley, Block. Motion carried. 

No . 72-412 

Motion by Oakley, supported by Stewart, to autorize the 
Gerk to let bids for two officials vehicles with 
specification changes as made by City Council. Roll call 
vote showing. Ayes - Oakley, Stewart, Block, Bizek, 
Edwards, Raspberry. Nays - none. Motion carried 
unanimously. 

No. 72-413 

14 Motion by Block, supported by Oakley, to adjourn 
the meeting Roll call vote showing Ayes - Block, Oakley, 
Stewart, Bizek, Raspberry, Edwards. Nays - none. Motion 
carried unanimously 

Respectfully submitted 
Leonard J. Folmar, Gerk 
City of Romulus 

I, Leonard J Folmar. Gerk of the City of Romulus, do 
hereby certify that the foregoing is a true copy of the 
minutes of the Regular Council Meeting held on June 27, 
1972 

Leonard J. Folmar, Gerk 
City of Romulus 


Legislators 9 
tally sheet 



STATE SENATE 
(Week of June 19-23) 

No major roll call votes taken. 

(Week of June 12-16) 

Senate vote on Senate bill appropriating $91.6 million for 
the State Treasury Department. Passed, 26-11. Bill sent to the 
House. Yea - McCauley. Nay Faust. 

Senate vote on House bill allowing school districts to 
borrow- funds and to purchase sites for buildings and 
facilities. Loans and bonds must not be issued for more than 
30 years nor for more than five per cent of the state equalized 
value (SEV). Passed, 29-6. Bill sent to governor. Yea - Faust, 
McCauley. 

Senate vote on Senate bill authorizing local school boards 
to levy an operational millage up to one-tenth of one per cent 
of state equalized valuation (SEV) of property in its area. 
Defeated, 13-23. Yea - Faust, McCauley. 

Senate vote on Senate bill providing for a uniform type of 
county government, including an appointed county manager, 
an elected county executive and a board of commissioners. 
Passed, 22-14. Bill sent to House. Yea - Faust, McCauley. 

Senate vote on conference committee report establishing 
four circuit judgeships and six district judgeships for election 
this fall, with seven remaining circuit judgeships to be 
established in the November. 1974 elections. Passed, 25-9. Bill 
sent to governor. Yea - McCauley. Nay - Faust. 

Senate vote on Senate bill appropriating $331.5 million for 
state institutions of higher learning. Passed, 24-11. Bill sent to 
House. Nay - Faust, McCauley. 

Senate vote on House bill establishing state - local revenue 
sharing in Michigan. Passed, 18-9. (Reconsideration ex- 
pected). Nay - McCauley. No vote - Faust. 

Senate vote on House bill appropriating $1.27 billion for 
Social Services Department. The bill, a tough welfare 
proposal, includes more strict eligibility standards, requires 
adult recipients to accept relief work assignments and 
transfers funds from ADC recipients to medically indigent 
senior citizens. Passed, 21-14. Bill goes to Senate - House 
conference committee. Yea - McCauley. Nay - Faust. 

(Week of June 5*9) 

Senate vote on Senate Joint Resolution establishing a state 
student grievance commission. Members of the commission 
would have been elected at statewide non-partisan elections 
for two-year terms. Had the bill passed the commission 
would have had the power to investigate student grievances 
and to approve, amend or appeal the actions of the governing 
board of the institution. Defeated, 17-19. Yea - Faust. Nay - 
McCauley. 

Senate vote on House bill adding mobile homes to the retail 
installment sales act. The bill will make mobile homes 
subject to retail sales tax and all the usual interest rates and 
requirements of other retail items. Passed, 27-9. Bill sent to 
governor. Nay - Faust, McCauley. 

Senate vote on Senate bill to establish no-fault automobile 
insurance in Michigan. Passed, 24-10. Bill sent to House. Yea 
- Faust, McCauley. 


STATE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 
(Week of June 19-23) 

House vote on conference committee report establishing 
state revenue sharing between the state and local units. 
Passed. 70-31. Bill sent to governor. Yea - Brown, Pilch. Nay - 
Mahalak. Tierney, Young. 

House vote on House bill authorizing judges, mayors and 
authorized ministers to perform marriages and prescribing a 
$10 marriage license fee. Passed, 60-38. Bill sent to Senate. 
No vote - Mahalak. 

House vote on conference committee report establishing 
four circuit judgeships and six district judgeships for election 
this fall, with seven remaining circuit judgeships to be 
established in the November, 1974 elections. Passed, 89-11. 
Bill sent to governor. Yea - Mahalak. 

(Week of June 12-16) 

House vote on House bill limiting mortgage interest rates 
to seven per cent or lower. Passed, 79-16. Bill sent to Senate. 
No vote - Mahalak. 

House vote on House bill lifting the bounty on coyotes and 
wolves. Passed, 59-37. Bill sent to Senate. No vote - Mahalak. 


U.S. SENATE 
(Week of June 19-23) 

Senate vote to block military base agreements with Por- 
tugal and Bahrain until the Nixon administration resubmits 
these agreements as treaties requiring Senate ratification. 
Passed, 41-36. Nay - Griffin. No vote - Hart. 

Senate vote on $2.95 billion comprehensive child care 
authorization bill which would provide a nationwide system 




3 


CITY OF ROMULUS 

NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

Notice is hereby given that the Romulus City Council 
will hold a Public Hearing on July 25. 1972 at 7:00 p.m. in 
the Romulus City Council Chambers, 1111 Wayne Road. 
Romulus, Michigan on the following proposed Amend- 
ment to the Zoning Map: 

FROM RIA to RM 

The S.E. of theS.W. l 4 of Sec. 4 except the South 55 ft. 
of the East 411 87 ft. thereof: also except the west 5.00 


aah rtr tknpAAf 



Each week the Belleville Enterprise and Romulus Roman 
will list a tally of local legislators' voting — both state and 
national — on major roll call Issues in Lansing and 
Washington D.C. respectively during the previous week. 

The legislators include State Sen. William Faust 
(Democrat - 13th District) for the cities of Belleville and 
Romulus and townships of Huron and Van Buren; State Sen. 
John E. McCauley (Democrat - 12th District) for Sumpter 
Township; State Rep. Edward E. Mahalak (Democrat - 38th 
District) for all of the above listed areas; U.S. Rep William 
D. Ford (Democrat - 15th District) for all of the above listed 
areas, and U.S. Senators Philip A. Hart (Democrat) and 
Robert P. Griffin (Republican) for the State of Michigan. 

A synopsis of the measures will be published, followed by 
their disposition and local legislators' actions. 


of child care and development services. Passed, 73-12 Bill 
sent to House. Yea - Griffin, Hart. 

Senate vote on bill to establish a separate consumer agency 
which would protect the public from harzardous foods, drugs 
and consumer products used in the home. Passed, 69-10. Bill 
sent to House. Yea - Hart. No vote - Griffin, although he 
would have voted for bill. 

Senate vote to create a board to handle grievances by 
foreign service officers. Passed, 56-27. Bill sent to House. Yea 
- Hart. Nay - Griffin. 

(Week of June 12-16) 

Senate vote on measure stripping all funding from the con- 
troversial Subversive Activities Control Board. Passed, 42- 
25. No vote - Griffin, Hart. 

Senate vote on proposed unilateral slash in the United 
Statescontributiontothe United Nations. Defeated, 28-39. No 
vote - Griffin, Hart 


(Week of June 5-9) 

Senate vote to confirm nomination of Richard G. Klein- 
dienst to be attorney general. Passed, 64-19. Yea - Hart, 
Griffin. 


U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 
(Week of June 19-23; 

House vote on President Nixon’s bill to share $29.5 billion in 
federal revenues with state and local governments over the 
next five years. Passed, 274-122. Bill sent to Senate. Yea - 
Ford. 


(Week of June 12-16) 

House vote on House bill to increase appropriations for 
federal health and education programs in the next fiscal year 
by $1.3 billion above the administration’s budget. Bill passed, 
277-60. Yea - Ford. Bill sent to Senate. 

House vote on House bill to forbid the Labor Department 
from paying its inspectors for checking job safety conditions 
of employers with 25 or fewer employes. Passed, 213-154. Bill 
sent to Senate. Nay - Ford. 

(Week of June 5-9) 

House vote on Senate bill to appropriate $21.3 billion for 
higher education, including the Broomfield-O’ Hara amend- 
ment to freeze court ordered busing until January, 1974. 
Passed. 218-180. Bill sent to the President. Yea - Ford. 


( Week of May 29-June 2) 

House bill to*change name of Subversive Activities Control 
Board to the Federal Internal Security Board and to expand 
its duties. Passed, 226-106. No vote - Ford. 


CITY OF ROMULUS 


NOTICE OF LETTING 


SpalpH nrooosals will be received by the Romulus City 
mu Wayne Rd., Romulus, Michigan, until 5:00 
p.m. Julv 27, 1972, for the following equipment: 

One (1) 1973 Four Door Sedan 

One (1) 1973 Nine Passenger Sedan 

1 ) Proposal shall be submitted on forms furnished by 
the City, which may be obtained at the Romulus City 
Gerk's Office. 11111 Wayne Rd., Romulus, Michigan and 
shall be enclosed in an envelope endorsed “Bid For City 
Car.” 

2) The right is reserved by the Gty to reject and-or all 
bids and two waive technicalities, deemed most ad- 
vantgeous to the Gty. 

3) Bids will be publicly opened at the Regular Meeting 

of the Romulus City Council at 8:00 p.m. on July 27, 1972 in 
the Council Chambers, 11111 Wayne Road, Romulus, 
Michigan. jg 

Leonard J. Folmar, Gerk ;‘ : : 

Gty of Romulus £ 


:•: 


:•: 


WAYNE COUNTY ROAD 
COMMISSION 

To me Supervisor and Clerk of the Township of Van Buren. Wayne County. 

Michigan 

Sirs 

You are hereby notified that the Board of County Road Commissioners of the 
County oi Wayne. Michigan, did, at a meeting of said Baord held on June 77 . 1972, 
decide and determine that the certain road described in the minutes of said Board 
should be a County road under the jurisdiction of the Board of County Road 
Commissioners The minutes of said meeting fully describing said road are 
hereby made a part of this notice, and are as follows 
Mmutes of the regular meeting of the Board of County Road Commissioners of 
the County of Wayne, Michigan, hek* at the Board s offices, 7th Floor. City County 
Building. Detroit. Michigan, at 9 00 A M . Eastern Standard Time. Thursday. 
June 72. 1972 

Present Chairman Berry. Vice Chairman Neudeck and Commissioner Bur 
ton 

Commissioner Burton moved the adoption of the following resolution 
BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of County Road Commissioners of the County 
of Wayne. Michigan that it hereby accepts the dedication to the useof the public of 
the following described road and It Is hereby taken over as a county road and 
made a part of the county road system of the County of Wayne 
That portion of the N W of Section 20 T 3S R 8E Van Buren Township. 
Wayne County. Michigan, which Is described as follows Beginning at a point on 
the south right-of-way line of the Willow Run Service Drive (I 94). distant the 
following 3 courses and distances from the N W corner of Section 20. vlx N 89 
degrees 22' 30” E . 234 00 feet. S 0 degrees 08' 35” E 83 00 feet and N 89 degrees 
22' 30” E 491 73 feet, and proceeding thence N 89 degrees 72 30' E , 86 00 feel, 
thence S 0 degrees 23' 20” W . 322 84 feet thence along the arc of a curve, con 
cave to the northeast. 485 22 feet, radius of said curve being 457 00 feet, central 
angle 60 degrees SO' and chord bearing S 30 degrees Of 40” E , 462 74 feet, thence 
S 60 degrees 26' 40” E , 1084 50 feet, thence along the arc of a curve, concave to 
the northeast. 67 84 feet, radius of said curve being 457 00 feet, central angle 8 
degrees 30' 70” and chord bearing S 64degrees4i 50” E . 67 78 feet thence S 68 
degrees 57' 00 E . 72 94 feet to a point designated as Point a thence S 0 
degrees 08' 20” W., 10 7) feet, thence N 68 degrees 57' 00” W . 307 74 feet thence 
N 68 degrees 03' 30 W . 798 76 feet thence N 60 degrees 26 40 W , 579 56 feet 
thence along the arc of a curve, concave to the northeast. 576 52 feet, radius of 
said curve being 543 00 feet, central angle 60 degrees 50' 00” and chord bearing N 
30 degrees 01' 40” W.. 549 82leet thence N Odegrees 23' 20” E . 321 37 feet, to the 
point of beginning ALSO That part of theaforesaid Section 20 which Is described 
as follows Beginning at a point on the existing southerly right-of way line of 
Denton Road. 66 feet wide, distant S 0 degrees 08 ' 70 W . 8) 36 feet from the point 
designated as Point "A” in the foregoing description, and proceeding thence 
along said existing right of way line, N 68 degrees 57' 00” W . 159 23 feet to its 
intersection with the proposed southerly right of way line of Denton Road. 86 feet 
wide, thence along this proposed line S 60 degrees 26 40 E 27 23 feel to a point 
of curvature thence along the arc of a curve, concave to the north 80 61 feet to a 
point of tangency. radius of said curve being 543 00 feet, central angle 8 degrees 
30' 20", and chord bearing S 64 degrees 41' 50” E 80 53 feet thence continuing 
along said proposed line S 68 degrees 57' 00” E . 55 80 feet thence N 0degrees08 
20" E . 10 71 feet to the point of beginning Constituting 0 337 mile of County Road 
to be designated Denton Road 

The motion was supported by Commissioner Neudeck and carried by the 
following vote 

Ayes Commissioners Neudeck and Burton 
Nays None 

Commissioner Berry abstained from voting 

THISNOTICE IS GIVEN UNDER ANO BY VIRTUEOF ACT NO 2830F THE 
PUBLIC ACTS OF 1909 AS AMENDED 
in testimony whereof. I have hereunto set my hand at Detroit Michigan this 
77nd day Of June. A D 197? 

BOARDOF COUNTY ROADCOMMISSIONERS 
OF THE COUNTY OF WAYNE MICHIGAN 
Michael Berry. Chairman 
Philip j Neudeck. Vice Chairman 
F reddle G Burton Commissioner 
By Henry J GalfCkt 
Secretary and Clerk of the Board 


UVtinesfla) . July 5, 1972 


Benefit horse show 
set for ‘Santa ’ Gribble 


A PANAX PUB LICATION 

« 


Census statistics show 


Page B -7 


Various 4 H members, 
parents, leaders and friends 
are busy planning a ‘Christ- 
mas in July’ benefit horse 
show for Eugene (Santa) 
Gribble. 

Gribble 13560 Ashton Dr., 
Romulus, who recently has 
become ill. is popular to both 
young and old in his many 
activites as “Santa” for the 
local area. 

He was a most favorite 
donut maker at the 4 -H fair, 
especially to a few who would 
ask and receive his mistakes, 
donuts broken, donut holes, 
etc. 


The “Christmas In July” 
benefit horse show will be held 
Sunday. July 23. at 8:30 a m. 
(rain or shine). 

Judge for the day’s events 
will be Jack Swartz of South 
Lyon. General Chairman of 
the horse show is Don Curry. 
He is also in charge of all 
funds which will help to pay 
the evermounting medical 
expenses. 

Mrs. Helen Curry and Mrs 
Connee Morris both of the 
Belleville Galloping 
Comedians 4-H Club, are co- 
chairmen. 

The two announcers for the 


day will be Mel Wood of the 
Mustanger’s 4-H Club and 
Chris Fischer of the 
Thunderbird 4-H Club. 
Ringmasters will be Don 
Morris and Larry Morris, both 
of Romulus 

Mis. Jacquie Bruin and 
members of the Mustanger’s 
4-H Club will be in charge of 
the presentation of trophies 
and ribbons. Miss Jan 
Fischer. Mrs. Rosemary 
Fischer, and Mrs. Jacquie 
Renier are in charge of the 
souvenir programs and show 
flyers 

Mrs Fischer and her 


Gremore’s attorney fee 
turned down by PCHA 


A request for payment of a 
MVutin lawyer’s bill from 
"listed executive director 
Kennth Gremore will not be 
paid b> the Peoples Com- 
munity Hospital Authority 
PCHA i 

The board last night voted 
unanimously not to pick up the 
lab which was submitted to 
the authority in a letter dated 
June 21 

l> " altl .1 Piz/imeuii, board 

chairman, said the first letter 
he received stated the board 
sh uld pay S17.000 for out-of- 
pocket legal expenses in- 


curred during his tenure as 
PCHA executive director. 
Gremore was fired for alleged 
mismanagement of funds 
during a scandal which 
erupted about six years ago. 

According to B Ward 
Smith, board legal counsel, 
the authority is not allowed to 
pay legal fees in defense of 
criminal action. 

In two civil suits included in 
the hill’s itemized breakdown, 
one was in a suit brought 
about by the state attorney 
general while Gremore was 
not employed by the PCHA. 

The other was when the 


former executive director 
sued the authority for breach 
of contract. 

Smith said he felt there was 
“no legal basis for paying the 
fees.” 

In other action, the Rev. 
R.R Rives. Garden City 
representative who sat in on 
his last PCHA meeting, an- 
nounced the authority had the 
acceptance of a clergyman to 
act as full-time chaplain. 

Itri . Rives, who retired 
from the pulpit of his church 
• wo months ago, has served on 
the hoard for more than 11 
vears. 


PCHA renews contracts 
for top hospital officials 


The Peoples Community 
Hospital Authority (PCHA) 
has renewed contracts for its 
four hospiUI administrators, 
puebasing director and 
director of rehabilitation 
medicine 

The PCHA Borad of 
Directors last week approved 
a three year contract for Dr. 
Frederick B. House, director of 


rehabilitation medicine, for 
$49,200. a $1,200 increase over 
last year. 

The contract's salary may 
he renegotiated each* year, 
and either party mav ter- 
minate it with 120 days notice. 

Dr. House has offices in all 
four PCHA facilities. 

Contracts were also ap- 


Higher homestead 
exemptions urged 


proved for Walter S. Wheeler. 
Annapolis Hospital ad- 
ministrator. Duane E. 
Johnson, chief at Outer Drive, 
Joseph T. Melling. Seaway 
administrator, and Alan R. 
Case, administrator at Beyer 
Memorial 

Wheeler and Jnhiisnii will 
receive $30,880 per year, while 
Melling and Case will get 
$24,980. increases of $1,080 for 
all four administrators. 

James E. Lester, pur- 
chasing director for the 
hospital, was also granted a 
$1,080 salary hike, bringing it 
•o $22,580. 


A resolution calling for 
increased Michigan 
Homestead Tax Exemption 
benefits for senior citizens, 
veterans and widows has been 
unanimously approved by the 
Romulus City Council. 

Councilman James C. 
Stewart requested the city 
council adopt such a 
resolution He was supported 
by Councilman Edmund W. 
Bizck and the council agreed. 

The reGilulinii points out 
thai Michigan state 
legislature has passed public 
acts providing for tax 
exemption for senior citizens, 
certain veterans and widows! 

It adds that the forces of in- 
flation have en>ded their ef- 
Icel drastically. 

The city council, in its 


resolution, requests that the 
state legislature increase the 
property limitation from 
Sio.ooo to $15,000 on the state 
equalization valuation <SEV> 
to qualify for exemption by 
veterans and widows 

The resolution also requests 
the state legislature to in- 
crease the senior citizens, 
veterans and widow's 
Homestead Tax Exemption 
from $2,500 assessed valuation 
to $7,500. 

Tin- city council directed 
that a copy of the resolution be 
sent to Gov. William G. 
Milliken. State Sen. William 
Faust, State Rep Edward E 
Mahalak. the chairman of the 
Senate and House taxation 
committee, and all 
municipalities of Wayne 
Coun’v. 


AUTO RACING 
EVERY 

SATURDAY NIGHT 

FLAT ROCK 
SPEEDWAY 

Telegraph at Newberg Rd. 
Mile S. of Flat Rock 

2 Big Features 
•Late Model Stocks 
•Plus Figure 8 
Spectacular 

Time Trials 6:45 P.M. 
1st Race 8: 15 P.M. 
FREE PARKING 

782-2480 


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DANCER’S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 
taiKicSI 514 MAIN ST., BELLEVILLE 

697-7780 



committee — consisting of 
Mrs. Mary Wood. Mrs Bonnie 
Neely, (both of the 
Mustangers), Mrs. Bonnie 
Berg (Plymouth Bridle 4 -H) 
and Mrs. Ella Cappuecio 
(Maverick’s) — will be in 
charge of the entry booth 

Handling gale sales will be 
the leaders Mr and Mrs. Fred 
Hay and their 4-H members 
known as the Romulus 
Western Riders. 

Many other leaders and 4 -H 
members are busy contacting 
donors and sponsors to help 
make ths show a success 

The 4-H Service Club will 
handle the food concession, 
therefore needing donors 
regarding refreshments. 

“Santa ” Gribble’s 
Gingerbread House can be 
seen at the fairgrounds during 
the horse show, complete with 
Christmas wreath and 
decorated Christmas tree. 

Ml local i ll clubs will be 
contacted as soon as their 
telephone numbers or ad- 
dresses are obtained. IX you 
are not contacted but would 
like to help, please contact one 
♦>f the following persons. 

Mr or Mrs Don Currv 
• Belleville). 697-7407; Mr. or 
Mrs. Chris Fischer 
1 Romulus >. 941-0067; Mrs. 
Connee Moris (Romulus), 941 
2838; Mrs Ella Cappuecio 
•Romulus). 941-2573; and Mrs. 
Jacquie Renier (Belleville). 
697-7409 

The schedule of events at 
the horse show' will be 
published next week 



90% of housing 
units have TV sets 


SANTA’ GRIBBLE 


Rezoning 

hearing 

slated 

The rezoning of a 40-acre 
parcel of land, located in the 
City of Belleville, from R-l 
(low density residential) to R 
IT (trailer park) will be the 
subject of a July 17 public 
hearing. 

The hearing will be con- 
ducted in the chambers of the 
city council, in the Municipal 
Building, 6 Main St., starting 
at 8 p m 

The rezoning request was 
filed by James Ackron, 
Belleville sewer contractor 
and landowner, and other 
owners of Belle Vista Mobile 
Home Estates, a 248 lot trailer 
park, located 955 Sumpter 
Rd.. Belleville 
The land up for rezoning 
would be used to extend the 
park south of the present area 
to Hull Road 


More than 90 per cent of the 
homes in Wayne County have 
television sets, according to 
satisfies recently released by 
the U S Bureau of the Census. 

Of the more than 870.000 
housing units in Wayne 
County. 802.000 boast at least 
one I elei vision set Of the 
television sets, some 561.000 
are equipped with UHF 
channel selectors. 

Twenty -four per cent of the 
house owners in Wayne 
County own air conditioning 
units. There are more than 

213.000 units in the county, 

177.000 room units and 36.000 
central systems. 

In addition, 76 per cent of 
the householders in the county 
lyiast some sort of a clothes 
washing machine Fifty per 
cent of the homeowners also 
own a clothes dryer and 13 per 
cent ow r n a dishwasher. 

Sixty-eight per cent of the 
housing units were built 

Hole-in-one 
tourney set 

The Hole-in-One golf 
program sponsored by the 
Van B)_ren Township summer 
program w ill be held at the K- 
Golf Driving Range, located 
on the 1-94 Expressway, west 
of Belleville Road on Satur- 
day. 

the golf event will be held 
during the hours of i - 4 p. m . 


before the 50s. 21 per cent 
were build before the 60s. and 
11 per cent were built before 
the April, 1970 census. 

Of 1 lie existing housing 
units. 67 per cent use gas to 
cook. 30 per cent use elec- 
tricity, and the remaining 
three per cent use either 
bottled, tanked or LP gas 
Ninety -eight per cent of all 
the housing units have com- 
plete kitchen facilities, while 
approximately the same 
number have complete 
bathroom facilities. 

Surprisingly, three percent, 
or 25.079. of all the housing 
units had no bedrooms, while 
13 per cent had one bedroom 
and 11 per cent had more than 
three bedrooms. 

Uniters occupied 31 per cent 
of the units, w’hile owners 
occupied 64 per cent of the 
units. The remaining units 
were unoccupied for more 
than a year, with 6,300 for sale 
and 24.00 for rent. 

Most importantly, there 


were 3.2 persons occupying 
each housing unit in the 
county, on the average. 

All the statistics w r ere 
compiled during the 1970 
Census of Housing in 
Michigan Copies are 
available from the Superin- 
tendent of Documents, U S. 
Government Printing Office. 
Washington. D C. 20402. 

Department of Commerce 
field offices located in the 
Federal Building in Detroit 
also carry copies of the report. 


NEED 

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Including: 

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SHEEK says: 

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Page B-8 


A PANAX PUBLICATION 


Wednesday. July 5. 1972 


Ask Senator Griffin 


Capitol tours free, 
thanks to Congress 


By U.S. SEN. ROBERT P. GRIFFIN 



Question: When I brought 
my family to Washington a 
few years ago we enjoyed 
visiting the landmarks but we 
were disappointed that we had 
to pay a fee when we toured 
the U.S. Capitol building. My 
sister and her family plan to 
visit Washington next month. I 
just want you to know that I 
don't think Americans should 
have to pay to see their 
government. It's our govern- 
ment too! 

-D.B., SaultSte. Marie 
Answer: It took an act of 
Congress in 1971 to do it — ■ but 
you will be pleased to know 
that guided tours of the U.S. 
Capitol are available now 
without charge. The tours 


EDITOR'S NOTE — Senator Robert Griffin will answer 
questions of general Interest through columns in 'Hie Daily 
Eagle. He will answer personally all correspondence ad- 
dressed to: Sen. Robert P. Griffin, Senate Office Building, 
Washington. D.C. 20510 


CONTINENTAL! 

CARPET CENTER 


IS 


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* Quality 

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for" 

YOU 


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Eugene or Yvonne Mills 
or call . .. 

CONTINENTAL! 

697-8900 


form in the Capitol Rotunda 
every 3-5 minutes from 9 a m. 
until 3:45 p.m I hope your 
sister and her family enjoy 
their trip to Washington. 
Please suggest that they visit 
my office in the Senate Office 
Building once they arrive. 

Question: My husband and I 
have been trying to adopt a 
Vietnamese orphan since last 
August. At first we were 
helped by an army chaplain, 
but now the case is bogged 
down in the Vietnamese 
bureaucracy. We have 
received little help from the 
government agencies we 
turned to. Can you help us? 

D.H., Detroit 

Answer: In April, I in- 
troduced a bill in the Senate 
entitled the “Vietnamese 
Orphan Act” which would 
make it easier for American 
citizens to adopt Vietnamese 


HALL 

FOR RENT 

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PROGRESSIVE 
CLUB INC. 

KITCHEN FULLY EQUIPPED 


PHONE 


941-7533 or721-1257 


1I580OZGA ROAD 
NEAR FIVE POINTS 


children who have been 
orhaned as a result of the war 
in Southeast Asia. If passed by 
Congress, the bill would cut 
through a lot of the red tape 
and bureaucratic obstacles 
you have encountered. The bill 
is now pending before the 
Senate Foreign Relations 
Commitee, and you could help 
get action by writing to the 
Chairman, Senator J. William 
Fulbright, Washington, DC. 

Question: My husband and I 
have been appalled by pic- 
tures on the television and in 
the newspapers showing the 
needless and brutal slaughter 
of seals, whales and porpoises 
What are you and your fellow 
Congressmen doing to stop 
this inhumane practice? 

— D S , East Lansing 


\ns.wer: The Senate 

Commerce Committee is now 
considering S 2871, a bill 
which I cosponsored entitled 
ihc Marine Mammal 
Protection Act of 1972 The bill 
would immediately impose a 
10-year moratorium on the 
killing of ocean mammals. At 
the end of the moratorium 
period, I he Secretary of the 
Interior would have authority 
to regulate the taking of these 
animals in a humane manner 
For decades men of all 
nationalities have cruelly 
misused ocean wildlife I am 


Question: I understand the 
Federal government publishes 
material on the preparation 
and storage of foods How can 
1 obtain this information? 

J.G., Marquette 

Answer: Write to the 
Superintendent of Documents, 
Government Printing Office, 
Washington, D C. 20402 and 
ask for a list of available 
government publications on 
the preparation of foods. The 
list and order forms will come 
to you free of charge 




THE Great SALE IS ON! 




semi-annual clearance of men’s 
one and two-trouser suits...sport coats... 
dress slacks...furnishings...boys’ wear 
at great, great savings. 

SUITS 

Hart Schaffner & Marx and other famous brands 
in Double Knits & Dacron wools. 

• 49 . 90 - 109.90 

SPORT COATS 

Hart Schaffer & Marx and other famous brands 
in Double Knits & Dacron wools. 99.89 90 

SLACKS 

Double Knit and Dacron-Wools in Flares 




and straight legs. Sizes 30-46 

FURNISHINGS 

Short sleeve dress and sport shirts 
Neckwear. Four-in-hand and clip-on 
Shoes... Casual... Dress... Boots 


• 12 . 99 - 23.99 

• 2 . 98 -* 12.98 

* 1 . 98 -» 5.98 

• 14 . 98 - 28.98 


BOYS' WEAR 

Casual slacks & jeans 
Sport shirts, short sleeve 
Nylon lightweight jackets 
Bermuda shorts 
Suits and sport coats reduced up to V2 off. 

122 W. Michigan Ave. Ypsilanti 

Open Monday & Friday ’til 8 p.m. 


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very hopeful thal this 
legislation will he enacted this 
year 

Question : We are firemen at 
Willow Run Airport and we 
are not covered under Social 
Security Yet Social Security 
Laxes have been taken out of 
our pay checks every month 
We contacted the Social 
Security office and com- 
plained. bul we are still being 
docked Can you do anything** 
— J.F., Ann Arbor 

Answer: You and your 
fellow’ firemen will soon 
receive checks refunding the 
Social Security taxes 
erroneously withheld. 
Firemen are not covered by 
Social Security, as you pointed 
out Unfortunately, because 
the Willow Run Airport is 
administered by the 
University of Michigan, there 
was a mix up and vou were 
being treated like other 
University of Michigan em- 
ployees If you have any more 
difficulty, get in touch with 
me. 



WHOSE HORSE IS THIS? — Wayne Animal Warden Hell 
Malkowski holds the reins on a Shetland pony that was found 
roaming around the city last week. The two-year-old stud 
was captured by police on Howe Road near Van Bom. and 
will be kept until claimed by its owner or bought. The pony is 
being quartered at a stable in Westland, owned by Walter 
Thompson. — Daily Eagle photo 


Found near Van Born 


Pony looking 
for lost owners 


The Wayne Police Depart- 
ment has a “horse with no 
name.'* 

. No, it’s not the popular 
contemporary record, but a 
real, breathing, eating horse 
— or. more accurately, a two- 
year -old Shetland pony. 

The police, who aren't really 
known for thejr cowboy-type 
talents, captured the pony last 
Tuesday when an anonymous 
caller informed them the 
animal was running loose 
along Howe Road near Van 
Baron at the city's southern 
limits. 

Patrolman Lenny Anderson 
and Pete Nelson were 
dispatched to the area and 
managed to chase and 
"corral," the horse in a 
nearby garage and hold it for 
Animal Warden Heli 
Malkowski. 

Malowski then took the pony 
to the dog pound, put it in a 
large pen and fed and watered 
it. Then the problem 
developed. 

Although the pound is a 
fairly large area, it still isn’t 


big enough to house large 
animals, and a horse cer- 
tainly fits into that 
classification 

Malkowski soon realized 
that unless the horse was 
claimed, he’d have to find 
another place to quarter it. 

After holding the pony for 
four dav^s, Malkow’ski finally 
found an area large enough to 
keep it. 

The dark-brown stud with 
the white blaze on its forehead 
is now roaming about the 
grounds of Walter 'niomp- 
son’s home in Westland. 

Thompson, who has a small 
stable at his home on 
Marquette, picked up the 
horse Saturday, and will keep 
it until it is claimed or bought. 

*Tve done this before." 
Thompson said. “I often keep 
large animals at my home 
when the Humane Society or a 
police department asks me 
to,” he said. 

"I guess I’ll keep this one 
until somebody comes for it." 


Waste wins one 


The Belleville American 
Waste team dropped two of its 
three weekend games in the 
Connie Mack League 

American Waste bowed to 
Model Cities of Ann Arbor. 5-4, 
on Saturday and then split a 
Sunday doubleheader w'ith 
Milan 

Milan captured the first 
game. 12-3. but American 
Waste came back to w r in the 
nightcap, 8-3. 

Tom Reeves’ home run in 
the bottom of the seventh 


PLEASE 
BE PATIENT 



WHILE WE’RE 
REMODELING! 

DOUGLAS 

CARPETS 

406 Mam, Belleville 

697-9137 


inning gave Model Cities its 
narrow victory over American 
Waste. 

Steve Theodore had two 
singles for the Belleville team. 

The American Waste pit- 
chers gave up only five hits in 
the opening game with Milan 
But they also walked nine 
batters. 

Doug Raymond, with a 
triple and single, and Kevin 
Bara, with a double and 
single, were the top hitters for 
American Waste in the losing 
cause 

American Waste pulled out 
its second game triumph with 
a five-run rally in the top of 
the seventh inning. 

The teams were tied at 3-3 
going into the final frame 

Gary Van Buhler singled in 
whai proved to be the winning 
run. 

Kevin Bara picked up the 
win in relief 

The weekend results left 
American Waste with a 4-5 
record 


Men in service 



Airman Orren M. Walters, 
son of Mr and Mrs. Lesler O. 
Walters of 13125 Edgedale Dr, 
Belleville, has completed his 
U.S. Air Force basic training 
al the Air Training Com- 
mand's Lackland AFB , 
Texas. 

He has been assigned to 
Lowry AFB, Colo., for 
training in the armament 
systems field. 

Airman Walters, a 1967 
graduate of Belleville High 
School, attended the 
University of Michigan and 
the University of Florida. His 
wife. Johanne, is the daughter 
of Mrs. Nancy R. Cash of 19 
Potter Dr., Belleville. 

Army Private First Gass 
Wayne A. Erhart, 18. son of 
Andrew A. Erhart, 43254 Judd 
Rd , Belleville, recently w f as 
assigned to the 574th Per- 
sonnel Service Co. near 
Hanau, Germany. 

Pfc Erhart is a personnel 
management specialist with 
the company. He entered the 
Army in November, 1971, 
completed basic training at 
Ft Knox. Ky.. and was last 
stationed at Ft. Benjamin 
Harrison, Ind. 

Marine Lance Corporal 
Raymond T Buhro, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank W. Buhro of 
10061 Hamilton Ct., Belleville, 
was promoted to his present 
rank while serving with the 
Third Force Service 
Regiment. Okinawa. 

He attended Cody High 
School in Detroit, and he 
joined the Marine Corps in 
February. 1971. 

Pvt Roy A. Cheever Jr.. 22, 
whose parents live at 9060 
Talladay Rd., Willis, recently 
completed advanced in- 
dividual training as a field 
artillery cannoneer with the 
1st Infantry Division Artillary 
at Ft. Riley. Kan. 

During his training, he 
learned the duties of a 
howitzer or gun section 
crewman He also received 
instruction in handling am- 
munition, setting fuses and 
preparing charges, com- 
munications and main- 
tenance. 

Pvt. Cheever. w’ho enlisted 
specifically to serve with the 
1st. is now guaranteed a 
minimum of 16 months of 
service with the division under 
the Army’s new unit of choice 
recruiting program. 

Pvt. Cheever entered the 



i ) 


ORREN M. WALTERS 

Army last January and 
completed basic training at 
Ft. Ord. Calif. 

He is a 1968 graduate of 
Lincoln High School in Yp- 
silanti. 

With a proud history that 
stretches from France and 
Germany in World War I to 
the highlands of Vietnam, the 
1st Infantry Division has an 
Army-wide reputation of 
being first when needed. 

It was the first U. S. Army 
Division to go overseas in 
World War I and meet the 
enemy, first to land in Britain 
in World War II and first to 
arrive in Vietnam in July. 
1965. Its combat mission 
accomplished. “The Big Red 
One” now makes its home at 
Ft Riley. 

Army Spec 4 Robert P. Sitz, 
son of Mr and Mrs. Alex H. 
Sitz Sr, 27521 Bell Rd.. New 
Boston, recently completed an 
18-week pharmacy specialist 
course at the Medical Field 
Service School, Brooke Army 
Medical Center, Ft. Sam 
Houston. Tex. 

Spec Sitz was trained in 
pharmacy management, 
pharmaceutical calculation, 
preparation, qualities, uses 
and effects of drugs. A general 
knowledge of chemistry, 
anatomy, physiology and 
pharmacy administration was 
provided in the instruction. 

Spec. Sitz is now qualified 
for assignment to an Army 
hospital or a medical unit in 
the field or at any Army in- 
stallation. 

.He entered the Army in 
February. 1971 and was last 
stationed at Ft. Lewis Wash. 

The 24-year-old soldier 
received his bachelor of arts 
degree from Wayne State 
University in 1970. 


Girl Scouts move 
to new quarters 


The Huron Valley Girl Scout 
Council will move from its 
offices of the last 10 years, 
located at 310 S. Huron St., to 
larger quarters at 19 N. 
Hamilton St., Ypsilanti, 
formerly the Conger-Bush 
Funeral Home 

The brick and frame 
building will more than 
double I he office space and 
triple the parking space of the 
present building and provide 
important new facilities for 
volunteers and staff. 

The move was originally 
recommended by a Long 
Range Planning Committee 
under the chairmanship of 
Wyeth Allen of Ann Arbor, 
which projected aims and 
needs of the council through 
1970. 

The 1970 report showed that 
the number of Girl Scouts in 
the council’s area — 
Washtenaw. Livingston, 
western Wayne, and northern 
Monroe counties — will grow 
from 11.000 in 1970 to 16,000 in 
1980 


Current enrollment is 12,500. 
The present office was pur- 
chased when total enrollment 
was less than 6.000. 

On tin* basis of this report, a 
request for assistance was 
made to the Kresge Foun- 
dation in Detroit. Their 
response was a challenge 
grant of $50,000, pledged last 
year with the understanding 
that the council raise the rest 
of the money needed within a 
year. This was done through a 
few additional gifts and sale of 
property to Consumers Power 
Company and sale of the old 
office building. No operating 
funds were used. 

In the new* building, the 6,600 
square feet of floor space will 
be divided into four units, 
administrative offices, field 
directors section, meeting 
rooms and a troop supplies 
and mailing room. The 66 by 
66 foot parking lot will ac- 
commodate 20 cars. 

An open house is planned for 
September. 


Girl Scouts’ camp 
still has vacancies 


(pod deal as qjr car 
insurance a State 
Farm Home-owners 
l>olicv Coll me today' 


O 


- /V 


DICK STOVE II 

U34I Allen Rd 
TAYLOR 717-1*70 


STATE FARM 

f>tt Coiwpjn* 

oHite Bloom^iUn. lll.ng.» 


<Sb> 


Camp Linden, the 400-acre 
resident camp operated by the 
Huron Valley Girl Seoul 
Council, opened last Wed 
nesday with a full enrollment 
of 160 Girl Scouts from 
throughout Washtenaw, 
Livingston, western Wayne 
and northern Monroe coun- 
ties. 

The girls are the first to use 
the $150,000 Hunter Lodge, the 
dining hall and recreation 
building, completed just in 
time for the opening session. 
They will also be I he first to 
take hay rides trips to over- 
night camp sites 

In another innovation. 
Junior Girl Scouts, ages 10 to 
12. this year will take back 
pack overnights. In these 
exercises, girls carry their 
food, water, tents and other 
equipment to a remote area of 
the camp and stay for a two- 
day primitive camping ex- 
perience 


A young French woman is 
one of the camp’ss 22 coun- 
selors this summer. Miss 
Anne Motin, 21. of Nates, 
France, is working at the 
camp for the entire summer, 
under the auspices of the 
national Young Women’s 
Christian Association. Camp 
director is Bill Schlief. 

Openings for Camp Lindfii 
are still available for session 
four, which runs from Aug. 9 
to Aug 23. 

To allow* more girls !o 
sample Girl Seoul camping, 
this year one-week sessions 
are being held along w’ith Iwo- 
wcek sessions from now until 
July 12 

Monstrous seals 

Male elephant seals may at- 
tain a weight of four tons and a 
length of 20 feet, making them, 
the world s largest seals. Na- 
tional GeoeraDhic says. 






Wednesday, July 5. 1972 


-A PANAX PUBLICATION 


Page B-9 


Maintenance items 
need priority list 


Legal Notices 


A list of maintenance items 
recently presented to the 
Romulus Board of Education 
involving five Romulus 
schools have been referred to 
Assistant Superintendent 
Thomas Janack. 

Janack has been instructed 
to list the maintenance items 

Trio endorsed 
in Romulus 

The Romulus Democratic 
Club has endorsed Robert D. 
Plank of 9960 S. Wayne Rd., 
Romulus, for Wayne County 
Commissioner for the 26th 
District and State Rep Ed- 
ward E. Mahalak of 10154 
Miriam St., Romulus as 
representative for the 38th 
Michigan Legislative District 
and Royce E. Smith, mayor of 
Belleville, for the state’s new 
22nd District. 


in priority order, according to 
cost, and present the list to 
School Superintendent Robert 
L McConeghy for a deter- 
mination on funding and re- 
presentation to the school 
board. 

The items, as presented to 
the school board included an 
adequate storage facility at 
the Gordohier Elementary 
School, approximate cost 
$2,000; parking areas at 
Merriman and Beverly 
elementary schools, 
estimated cost $5,500 and 
$3,500 respectively, and bus 
garage, estimated cost, $3,000. 

Also heat controls at the 
Beverly, Gordonier and 
Romulus Junior High schools, 
estimated cost, $19,000; floors 
at Romulus Elementary 
School. $3,000 and hand rails, 
doors and windows at the 
Romulus Junior High School, 
estimated costs. $1,000, $4,500 
and $12,500 respeftively. 


WAYNE COUNTY ROAD 
COMMISSION 

To me Supervisor and Clerk of the Township of Van Buren, Wayne County, 
Michigan 
Sirs: 

You are hereby notified that the Board of County Road Commissioner* of the 
County of Wayne. Michigan, did, at a meeting of said Board held on June 27, 1972, 
decide and determine that me certain section of county road described In the 
minutes of said meeting of said Board should be absolutely abandoned and 
discontinued as a public highway, reserving therein the easement set forth In said 
determination 

The portion of me minutes of said meeting fully describing said section of 
county road is attached hereto and made a part of this notice, which is given 
under and by virtue of Act 283 of the Public Acts of 1909. as amended 

In testimony whereof. I have hereunto set my hand at Detroit, 
Michigan, this 22nd day of June A D 1972 

BOARDOF COUNTY ROAO COMMISSIONERS 
OF THE COUNTY OF WAYNE, MICHIGAN 
Michael Berry, Chairman 
Philip J. Neudeck. Vice Chairman 
Freddie G Burton. Commissioner 
By Henry J, Galecki 
Secretary and Clerk of the Board 

RESOLUTION 

Commissioner Burton moved the adoption of the following resolution 
WHEREAS, pursuant to petition and In accordance with the provisions of 
Section II, Chapter IV. Act No. 283 of me Public Acts of 1909, as amended, this 
Board, by resolution dated September 23. 1970, set a date of hearing on said 
petition and directed a Hearing Examiner to hold said hearing, and 
WHEREAS said hearing was held at the time and place appointed, and the 
Board has considered the findings of fact as reported by its Hearing Examiner 
concerning the advisability of absolutely abandoning and discontinuing 
That portion of the right of way of Denton Road. 66 feet wide, in me N W ' « of 
1 .35,*: R 8 f * Y an , Buren Wayne County. Michigan, which is 

<> * scr ‘ b * d a * '<*'ows : Begmmng at a point in the north line of the existing rlght-of 
way of Denton Road, distant the following 5 courses and distances from the N W 
i° r .rJ , . Sec,lon ^ v,x N 89 degrees 22‘ 30"E • 234 00 feet; S 0 degrees 08 ' 35 " 
E . 83.00 feet N. 89 degrees 22' 30" E . 491.73 feet. S 0 degrees 23* 20" W.. 748 16 
J5? ,a ? d _ S 57_ 40" E_. ISO 39 feet and proceeding thence S 65 degrees 

c “ d * flre ” M ' 30 " E 344 « thence S 60 

40 E ^ 77 79,ee,; » h enceN 68 degrees 57* 00" W.. 174 32 feet, thence 
* 03 ^ w., 644.99 feet; thence N 65 degrees 57 1 40" W 478 86 feet . 

thefice tr o degrees 23' 20" E. 0.64 feet to a point on a curve, thence easterly along 
the arc of a curva concave to the norm, 142.17 feet radius of said curve being 173 
feeLcentral angle 47 degrees 05' 12" and chord bearing N 85 degrees 47' 19" E 
138.20 feet to me point of beginning, 
and 

WHEREAS, me premises were viewed In accordance with said statute 
NOW. THEREFORE. BE IT RESOLVED, that it Is in the best interest of the 
public that me above described county road or portion thereof be absolutely 
abandoned and discontinued and mat said road or portion thereof Is hereby ob 
sdutely abandoned and discontinued reserving therein easement tor public 
utilities and sewer purposes 

The motion was supported by Commissioner Neudeck and carried by the 
following vote: 

Ayes. Commissioners Neudeck and Burton. 

Nays. None. 

Commissioner Berry abstained from voting. 


FELIX F ROGALLE ATTY 
16510 Goddard Rd 
Romulus Mich 48174 

STATE OF MICHIGAN 
PROBATE COURT FOR 
THE COUNTY OF WAYNE 
679.226 

ESTATE OF HELEN 
WOJCIECHOWSKI. Deceased 
IT IS ORDERED thai on August I. 
1977 at 10 am. m the Probate Court 
room. 1211 Dclroil. Michigan, a hearing 
be held on the petition of Charles L 
Wojchiechowski for appointment of an 
administrator 

Pubhcaiion and service shall be made 
as provided by statute and Court rule 
Oated June 73 1972 
FRANK S SZYMANSKI 
Judqe ol Probate 
A True Copy 
Herman McKinney 
Deputy Probate Register 
Newspaper Belleville Enterprise & 
Legal Times 
7 5 7 17 & 7 19 77 

B 8 MO SHIER ATTY 
16830 Goddard Rd 
Romulus. M*ch 48174 

STATE OF MICHIGAN 
PROBATE COURT FOP 
THECOUNTY OF WAYNE 
621.480 

ESTATE OF MINNIE BINGEL 
Deceased 

IT IS ORDEREO lhat on July 24 1972 
at 10 a m .n the Probate Court room 
• 309 Detroit. Michigan, a hearing be held 
on the petition ot Elmer H McKee 
r«rcutor for allowance ot his first an 
nuai account, and tor an extension of 
time tor riosmg said estate 
Publication and serv.ee shall be made 
as provided by statute and Court rule 
Dated June 70 1977 
JOSEPH J PERNICK 
Judge ot Probate 
A True Copy 
Herman McKinney 
Deputy Probate Register 
Newspaper Belleville Enterprise & 
Legal Times 
7 5. 7 12 6. 7 19 72 

B B MOSHIER ATTY 
16830 Goddard Rd 
Romulus Mich 48174 

STATE OF MICHIGAN 
PROBATE COURT FOR 
THE COUNTY OF WAYNE 
628 .8 S3 

ESTATE OF CARL H GUST. 
Deceased 

IT IS OROEREO that on July 17. 1972 
at 10 a m . in the Probate Court room, 
1319 Detroit. Michigan, a hearing be held 
on the petition of Louise E Heidenrich 
for appointment of an dmlnlstrator 
Publication and service shall be made 
as provied by statue and Court rule 
Dated June 12. 1972 
GEORGE N BASHARA. JR 
Judge of Probate 
A True Copy 
Herman McKinney 
Deputy Probate Register 

Newspaper Belleville Enterprise & 
Legal Times 
6 21. 6 28. & 7 5 72 

COZADD, SHINGLE & SMITH ATTYS 
2143 First National Bldg 
Detroit, Mich 48276 

STATE OF MICHIGAN 
PROBATE COURT FOR 
THE COUNTY OF WAYNE 
587.391 

ESTATE OF CLAYTON SCHULTZ. 
Deceased 

IT IS OROERED lhat on November 
20. 1972 at 10 a m in the Probate Court 
room. 1309 Oefroit. Michigan, a hearing 
be held on the petition ot Eva M Zoliars, 
administratrix, lor allowance of her 
second and final account, for tees, tor 
assignmeni ot residue and that the 
portion of said estate which would be 
assigened to Kenneth Schulti, an absent 
apparent beneficiary of said estate be 
assigned in accordance with the statue 
in such case made and provided 
Publication and service shall be made 
as provided by statue and Court rule 
Dated June 14. 1972. 

JOSEPH J PERNICK 
Judge of Probate 
a True Copy 
Herman McKinney 
Deputy Probate Register 
Newspaper Belleville Enterprise & 
Legal Times 
6 78. 7 5 & 7 12 72 


See Explosive I.R.A. World Championship 

J BAR J RANCH 




I.R.A. 

SANCTIONED 


America's roughest sport at its rugged best with cowboys and cowgirls 
competing for world championship points on the Wests' toughest, 
double rank livestock. 


FRI., JULY 7 at 7:30 P.M. 
SAT., JULY 8 at 7:30 P.M. 
SUN., JULY 9 at 2:30 P.M. 

4-H FAIRGROUNDS 

1-94 AT BELLEVILLE RD. 


ADULTS 
$3.00 

SPONSORED BY 

THE HURON VALLEY CONSERVATION ASSOCIATION 


CHILDREN 
UNDER 12 

$ 2.00 




88 


f>: 


VAN BUREN TOWNSHIP 
PLANNING COMMISSION 

NOTICE 

The regular meeting of the Van Buren Township 
Planning Commission, scheduled for July 5, 1972, has been 
rescheduled for 

JULY 12, 1972 - 8:00 P.M. 

g: All regular business scheduled for the July 5th meeting 
i£ will be heard July 12, 1972. 

g* ERMA J. PAYNE. CLERK 

gj Van Buren Township 

CHARLES WALLS, Chairman 
Planning Commission 

r VAN BUREN TOWNSHIP 

SPECIAL MEETING 

ijij Special Meeting - June 19. 1972 

& The meeting opened with the pledge of allegiance and 
jij: was called to order by Supervisor Gollwitzer at 8:00 p.m 
Members present were Gollwitzer, Birk. Blend. Cullin, 
gj Hogan, Maton, Payne and Sec. Kobish. Also Attending 
g were some 130 citizens. 

:j: The purpose of the special meeting was the placing of 
jg the following proposal on the August 8th ballot: 

£; “Shall the Township of Van Buren accept Edison Pointe j 
S Park, Belleville Lake, and certain surrounding lands j 
:£ presently owned by the Detroit Edison Company as a 

$ " 

jg Following much discussion Motion Blend support Cullin 
gj to place this proposal on the August 8th ballot Roll call 
*£ vote showed Birk no, Blend yes, Cullin yes, Hogan no, 
jg Maton abstained, Payne no. Gollwitzer yes, 3 yes, 3 no 
jg motion died 

§: Motion Blend, support Maton. to adjourn. Motion 
gj carried unanimously. 

$j G.E. Gollwitzer. Supervisor 

•g Van Buren Township 

gj Erma J Payne. Clerk 

j& Van Buren Tow nship 

jjjj Regular Meeting - June 27.1972 

jij: The Meeting opened with the pledge of allegiance and 
£: was called to order by Supervisor Gollwitzer at 8:00 p m 
Members present were Gollwitzer, Birk, Blend. Cullin. 

Sj Hogan, Maton, Payne. Attorney Hopson, Engineer 
g: Levine and Sec. Kobish. Also attending were some 38 
:g citizens. 

Motion Hogan, support Cullin, to accept as presented, 

5 the minutes of the June 13 regular meeting and the June 19 

jg special meeting. Motion carried unanimously 

£ A letter from the Michian State Highway Department 

jg on the 1-275 corridor study was read and filed. 

gj A letter from the Belleville-Van Buren Jaycees asking 

gj for a donaton for fireworks was read. 

jg Motion Hogan, support Birk, to combine the Public 

gj Hearing as requested by Ginn and Kramer Attorneys on 

£ the George Rholer rezoning with a regular meeting to be 

j>j set up by the Clerk and attorney. Motion carried : 




unanimously. 

Motion Blend, 
resolution from 
unanimously. 
Motion Blend, 


support Cullin, to note and file the 
Plymouth Township. Motion carried 


support Hogan, to note and file the j:j 
ji resolution from Riverview. Motion carried unanimously. jij 
£ Motion Cullin, support Blend, to support the resolution :j: 
jij from Brownstown on HB 5252. and send a copy to the g 
g: Governor. Motion carried unanimously. g 

•g Motion Hogan, support Payne, to appoint a bipartisan 9 £ 
jg man committee 5 members appointed by Gollwitzer 4-gj 
:g members appointed by Hogan to study all ramifications gj 
gj and cost related to accepting Edison Lake and point and ijij 
ijij whatever the cost is should be a part of the proposition on >g 
jg the November ballot. Motion showed 3 yes and 3 no with jgj 
jjji Trustee Maton abstaining. Motion died. / gj 

jjjj Motion Maton, support Hogan, to accept the recom- gj 
. g: mendation from the DPW and accept the bids from g 
jjjj Pezzani and Reid for a 20 yard packer on a 138 inch wheel jjj 
jS base from Atchinson Ford for a total cost of $7,234.35. £ 
jjjj Motion carried unanimously. jjj 

Motion Blend, support Hogan, to amend the main 
jjjj motion to the Liquor Control Commission to include ap- jj: 
jg proval subject to approval of Planning Commission on jij 
g: rezoning of property. Motion Carried unanimously. £ 
gj Motion Payne, support Hogan, to recommend to the jij: 
jjjj Liquor Control Commission to approve Mr. Toth’s request gj 
jjjj for a Class C liquor license above all others. Roll call vote ijij 
ijij showed: Birk yes, Cullin, no, Maton yes, Blend no, Hogan :g 
:£ yes, Payne yes. Motion carried 4 yes to 2 no. £: 

•g Engineer Levine presented plans to cross Belleville jij: 
jjjj Lake with a sewer line. Due to recent developments this ijij 
jjj: matter was tabled for additional information, 
ijij Motion Blend, support Maton, to appoint for a 1 year jij: 
•g term to the Industrial Commission the following: Stephen jiji 
jg Kuchta Hanno Fontaine, Gildo Rucci and Floyd Griffith. ijij 
g Motion was a 3 to 3 vote. Due to the motion not asking for a Sg 
roll call, there is some confusion as to the motion being jiji 
gj passed thefore same will be on the agenda for the next £: 
£ regular meeting. , 

£: Motion Maton, support Hogan, to refer the problem of | 

g: transportation of dismantled vehicles to the Police $ 
Commissioner Motion carried unanimously. £: 

:£ Motion Blend, support Maton, to appoint Richard Krug ;£ 
•g and Phillip Eller to the Water and Sewer Commission, g: 
% Motion carried unanimously. S 

!:•: Motion Payne, suppoi c Cullin, to grant the request of the gj 
£: dog warden and expand the dog pound for approximately £ 
£ $4,000 if money is available in budget. Motion carried £: 
£ tnanimously. ' g 

■:*: 

v Motion Payne, support Hogan, to pay for the killing of :£ 
jg .livestock as per our ordinance. Motion carried g 
g unanimously. g* 

:£ Motion Hogan, support Cullin, to recommend to the :j: 
v liquor Control Commission to grant the request of Ray £ 
Verrot on an SDM license. Motion carried unanimously, ig 
£; Motion Maton, support Cullin, to renew the kennel jg 
g: licenses of Mary Ann Blair 41870 Tyler and TTiomas i£ 

g ; Melville of 43219 Alva Dr. upon the recommendation of the S 

:£ Dog Warden. Motion carried unanimously. £: 

g: unanimously jg 

g Motion Hogan, support Payne, to accept the Police :j:j 
jg Department report. Motion carried unanimously, 
g Motion Payne, support Cullin, to accept the report of the jij: 

Fire Dept No. 1. Motion carried unanimously, 
g: Motion Payne, support Birk, to grant Fire Dept. No. 2 an ijij 
jg evening out for their job well done on the addition to the jg 
:j:j fire Hall. Motion carried unanimously. 

>j: Motion Maton, support Cullin, to accept the Building ijij 

jwj: Department and Dog W'arden reports. Motion carried j£ 

gj unanimously. gj 

:j:j Motion Payne, support Hogan, to receive for audit the j:ji 
g VVater Dept, report Motion carried unanimously, 
jg Motion Hogan, support Birk. to pay the bills as per gj 
jij: voucher. Motion carried unanimously, 
jij: Motion Ho£an. support Payne, to adjourn. The motion jij! 

j:j: carried unanimously and the meeting adjourned at 9:30 ijij 

jg p.m. jg 

G.E. Gollwitzer, Supervisor ijij 

x Van Buren Township g; 

:ji Erma J. Payne, Clerk ijij 

£ Van Buren Township £ 


Id 
I a 

1 

L 

Y 

E 

A 

G 

L 

E 

W 

A 

N 

T 

A 

D 

S 

7 

2 
9 

3 

3 

0 

0 


V 

Obituaries 15 Autos for Sale IS Autos for Sale 


H O V E Y , ELMER 
KRANCIS. Of 44325 Ex 
pressway, Belleville. 
Died June 29th in New 
Port Richey, Florida 
after an accident Born 
January 17th, 1953 in 
Belleville, to Maurice and 
Katharine Hovey Sur- 
vivors include his mother 
Mrs Katharine Hovey; 5 
sisters. Mrs Barbara 
McArthur of Belleville, 
Mrs Zoe McCready of 
New' Port Richey, Mrs. 
Eleanore Butzin of 
Belleville. Mrs Marjorie 
Cole of Louisiana. Dianna 
Hovey of Belleville 
Brother of Gilbert from 
California, Norman of 
Westland, Bernard of 
Cleveland. Ohio He had 
attended Western 
Michigan. Services were 
Monday. July 3 at 1:30 
from Robert Bros. 
Funeral Home. Belleville 
Interment Hillside 
Cemetery. Belleville 


THE ASSOCIATED 
NEWSPAPERS 
CLASSIFIEDAOS 
It's so easy to place an Eagle 
Classified Ad — Just dial 
729 3300 

Hours 

MONDAY THRU FRI 8 00 am 
10 5 30 pm SATURDAY 6 00 
am fo 12 00 noon 
it is the responsibility of the 
advertiser to check the 
correctness of each insertion 
of an advertisement Notice of 
error must be given before 
5 00 the day of publication 
The Associated Newspapers 
wilt not be liable for more than 
the cost ot one incorrect 
insertion nor for more than the 
cost of that part of an ad 
rendered valueless by an 
error. 

INDEX OF 
CLASSIFICATIONS 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Classification 1 thru 9 
AUTOMOTIVE 

Classifications 12 thru 20 
AUCTIONS 

Classifications 25 and 76 
EMPLOYMENT 

Classifications 30 thru 35 
FINANCIAL 

Classifications 40 thru 44 
INSTRUCTION 

Classifications 45 thru 47 
LIVESTOCK 

Classifications 50 thru 56 
MERCHANDISE 

Classifications 60 thru 87 
ROOMS & BOARD 

Classif ications 85 thru 90 
REAL estate rent 
C lassifications 91 thru 1U0 
REAL ESTATE sale 

Classifications 101 thru 113 
TOCANCEL EAGLE 
CLASSIFIEDAOS 
Call promptly following 
results and you will only be 
charged lor the number ot 
days that the ad actually runs 


1. Funeral Directors 


LENT S FUNERAL HOME 
34567 Michigan 

Wayne 721 5600 


JOHN N SANTEIU.& SON 
1139 Inkster Road 
427 3800 


UHT MEMORIAL 
FUNERAL HOME 
35400 Glen wood Ave 
Westland 721 8555 


BAUM FUNERAL HOME 
36885 Goddard Rd 
ROMULUS 941- 9200 


ROBERTS BROS., INC. 

709 Main St. 

697 9400 Belleville 679 S431 


2. In Memoviam 


OUR SON Jerry is missed so 
ternbley bad on this holiday 
Howard Watkins Family. 34966 
Richard St Wayne. 

4. MonumenU- 
Ometery Lott 


LEAVING STATE 

4 burial I lot. Masonic Gardens in 
Cadillac Memorial Gardens 77 N 
Wiard Road Ypsi Call 483 8595. 


6. Notices 


BELLEVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 
teenagers want part time work 
Interested employers call Youth 
Employment Service 697 7682 


9 . Lost it Found 


FOUND Watch Avondale John 
Daly 

CR 8-9156 


LOST BLACK and Ian toy Ger 
man Shepherd, male, with 
Westland lags, vicinity ol 
Michigan between Merriman and 
Venoy Reward Family's pet 779 
4165 


LOST Dachshund 

Small Dog Vicinity of Cherry Hill 
& Wayne Road Reward 722 1727 


14. Auto Accessories 


383 Engine, Torque 111 Irons 

728-9500 -Call Jerry 


2 M & H RACEMASTER 

Slicks, si/e 1100x15 mounted on 
15x0' i Ansen wheels. Will sell 
together or separate Chfap S62S 
Sheldon Rd bet Mich and Van 
Born 770 4740 


15. Autos for Sale 


1971 MALIBU 2 door Hardtop v 8 
automatic power steering bucket 
seats console radio, whitewalls, 
rally wheels Orange with a black 
vinyl roof i black sport striping 
SALE PRICEO - * 7 S9S 

(^Mark 

CHEVROLET 
33200 Michigan Ave. 

. 722-914 7 

FOR GOOD BUY on used cars, see 
CARL'S AUTO PARTS 14090 
Martinsville Belleville 697 1501 


1969 IMPALA CONVERTIBLE 
PS 4 P 0 very good tires 34 000 
m.lev $1495 699 7185 


71 TORINO 

| tordor. 351 VI 2 barrel. P S L 
P B duel rear seat speakers am 
R adio, heater rear window 
defoggers tmted glass 16 000 
actual miles Excellent condibon 
326 2377 


1964 OLDS 

t door S125 772 1684 


1970 CHEVROLET IMPALA 
automatic trans PS & P B 
ijood condition 42 000 miles $1700 
941 5669 

I960 VW & 1967 Triump 
j AM F M radio S new 1 ires on both 

I AV 2 4899 between 4 30 i 7 00 Ask 
tor Jackie 


MAVERICK 1971 

7 door, automatic, excellent 
condition 11625 Call alter 6 pm 
941 2309 


G4 MERCURY 

Fair condition mech excellent 
$:0Q 771 <$347 

1%9 GALAXIE 500 

Hardtop eight cylinder, power 
steering and a-r conditioning 

$1595 

ATCHINSON 

FORD SALES & SERVICE 
9800 BELLEVILLE RD Belleville 
697-9161 728-1555 

1969 SIMCA 1204 wagon. 15.385 
miles excellent condit on $800 
697 9574 week nights all day 
weekends 


69 CHEVROLET Imp A C. 2 dr 
ht 69 Tor.no last back GT auio . 
$1350 your choice 7? » 5200 


197? VEGA WAGON FACTORY 
air 4 Speed trans . radio 
whitewalls wheel covers Orange 
with a black interior SAVE* 
SAVE' SAVE' $2295 

^MARK 

CHEVROLET 
33200 Michigan Ave. 

722-9147 


1970 MAVERICK 6 St.Ck radio 
15.000 Miles Ready io go' You 
can t beat us or price* 

METRO WAYNE 
USED CARS 

3SSJS M.ch . Way,'. 7 J9 4U0 


Chry.ler Plymouth Valiant 

FEISTER AUTO SALES 
37-101 Ford Rd 

Corner of Newburgh PA 1 2400 

MARK CHEVROLET 
Newi Used Cars 
33200 MICHIGAN 722 9147 


FINEST USEOCARS! 

Many Makes & Models 
All Equipped 

Any old trade regardless of cond 
FREE TOW — WE FINANCE 
BOB FOR O, 14552 Mich LU 2-1172 


1969 MUSTANG Grande. V I auto , 
power steering 8. brakes n.ce car 
$1595 722 8483 


1970 MAVERICK Tudor 6 
cylinder, automatic. rad-o. 
whitewalls Custom interior An 
all red beauty 1 100 per cent 30 
DAY WARRANTY Sale Priced 1 
ONLY $1295 

^ Mark 

CHEVROLET 
33200 Michigan Ave. 

722-9147 


I960 TORINO SHARP' SHARP' 
Power. Ready to Go' Our low. low 
pre 4th price, your old car will 
prob make the dn payment 

METRO WAYNE 
USED CARS 

3SS4SMich Ave . Wayne 729 4800 


We buy and sell used cars 
TYME SALES 
455 5566 


NORTH BROS. FORD 

33100 Ford Rd 421 1430 

Spit ler-Demmer Ford 

Corner of Newburgh & Michigan 

721-2600 


1971 CADILLAC Fleetwood 
Brougham, fully loaded, sharp' 
BEGLINGER MASSEY. 684 Ann 
Arbor Rd.. Ply 453 2071. 


HARGROVE OLDS 

New & Used Cars 
33073 Michigan. Wayne 


1971 CADILLAC FLEETWOOD 
BROUGHAM FULLY LOADED. 
SHARP'! BEGLINGER 
MASSEY. 684 Ann Arbor (M 14). 
Ply. 453 2071 


1968 BUICK SPECIAL DeLuxe 
WAGON V 8. automatic, power 
steering & brakes. radio, 
whitewalls All while 8, very nice 
SALE PR ICS — $1095 

*^Mark 

CHEVROLET 
33200 MICHIGAN AVE 

722-9147 


1971 PINTO 

Two door. 2000 engine, automatic, 
radio and white sidewalls 

$1595 

ATCHINSON 

FORDSALESi SERVICE 
9800 Belleville Rd , Belleville 

697-9161 722-1555 


1968 Olds $850 

4 door, p s & p b 729 6777 


69 Falcon Futura fire engine red. 
excellent condition p s . 
automatic. 6 cylinder. 3S.000 
miles. SVOOO 722 8814. after 4 


69 MUSTANG 

Fastback, 289 fnpower 4 speed, 
mags new trans. good cond 
$1195 or best otter 721 2472 


A BOB FORDCUSTOMER IS 
A SATISFIED CUSTOMER 


1968 IMPALA V 6 automatic, 
power steering & brakes, radio, 
whitewalls, bucket seats, console, 
rally wheels 100 per cent — 30 
O A Y WARRANTY SALE 
PRICED - $1395 

^MARK 

CHEVROLET 
33200 Michigan Ave. 

722-9147 


1968 PONTIAC TEMPTEST 2 
Door Hardtop v 8 automatic, 
radio, vinyl top SALE $1195 $0 
DOWN 

FEISTER 

autosales 

37401 Ford Rd PA 1-2400 

Corner of Newburgh Rd 


64PonliacSla Wagon 

PS P B rad o 7J1 7985 after S 


CREOIT PROBLEM’?? No 
Problem' Call John a* 
HENDERSON DODGE 697 8070 


STUART WILSON FORD 
BEST OEAL 'N TOWN 
23535 Mich Ave Dbrn IO l 0500 

I960 MAI 1 0U : door Hardtop V 8 
automatic pemrr steer mg racbo 
whir wails W»'d W<th a h'a< h v - ny I 
root A biark .filer. or Bouqhi new 
from Mark Balance ot NEW CAR 
WARRANTY SAl.E PRICED 
$im 

ts Mark 

CHEVROLET 
33200 Michigan Ave. 

722-9147 


CREDIT NO PROBLEM 

NO APPLICATION REFUSED 
Cal' today Drive Tomorrow* Ask 
tor V.t 561 1220 


GOT CREDIT? 
LOW ON CASH? 

$25 YES! $25 ON. 

THAT'S ALL 
YOU NEED' 

To Purchase Any Mod*l & Make 
Of Your Choice Ranging from 
1967 s To 1971 s Including The 
BRAND NEW WIDE TRACK 1972 
PONTIAC 

TAKE YOUR VACATION 
4 HAVE MONEY TO 
SPARE' NO PAYMENTS 
TIL AUG 

Don t wa.t unM your car loses all 
value or til you owe more than its 
worth 

CALL NOW* 

455-2810 or 453-2500 
Ask For Mel 

BRUCE CRAIG 

PONTIAC 

074 W Ann Arbor Rd . Ply 


I960 PLYMOUTH VALIANT 2 
Door 6 cylinder, automatic, 
rao-o 37 ooo ACTUAL MILES' 
$1195 $ 0 DOWN 

FEISTER 

AUTO SALES 

37401 Ford Rd PA 1-2400 

Corner of Newburgh Rd 


SHARP 1968 OPEL 

4 *,peed VERY CLEAN 1 Priced to 
Sell at $085 

HAROLD DIETRICH 

BUICK OPEL 72I3T75 

33VT3 MiCh.gan Ave Wayne 


1969 PLYMOUTH VALIANT 2 
door 6 cylinder automatic. rad'O. 
whitewalls A very n.ce ONE 
OWNER CAR that any per 
spective buyer will like Only 
$1350 

Mark 

CHEVROLET 
33200 Michigan Ave. 

722-9147 


69 00DGE CHARGER 
440 4 spa. v 8. mags, clean S1S0O 
or bes* offer 722 0543 eve 


1970 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE 400 
4 Door Hardtop FACTORY AIR. 
Power Steering. Brakes. &. W n 
cows Automatic. Radio A LIKE 
NEW ONE OWNER CAR! $2695 

•HARGROVE* 

OLDSMOBILE 

33073 Michigan 7213630 


1969 FORD Station wagon 

Eiqht cylinder, automatic power 
steering 

$1395 

ATCHINSON 

FORD SALES & SERVICE 
9800 Belleville Rd.. Belleville 

697-9161 728-1555 


NEW 

JEEP 

PICKUPwith4 WHEEL DRIVE 

$2895 

FIESTA AMERICAN 

1205 Ann Arbor Rd , Ply. 453 360C 


18- & UP 

DRIVE NOW. . 

PAY LATER 

$50 ONLY $50 

Puts you in a car 
of your choice. 

Up to $1500 All Makes & Models 
If you qualify & are 18 or older ypu 
can drive away Ihe car of your 
choice 

TERMS TO SUIT YOUR 

BUDGET 

CALL NOW! 

455-2810 or 453-2500 
Ask For Mel 

BRUCE CRAIG 

PONTIAC 

874 W Ann Arbor Rd . Ply 


WESTBORN 

CHRYSLER PLYMOUTH 
NEW & USED CAR SALES 
23300 Mich Ave, Dbrn 562 3200 


Mulligan of Dearborn 

, LINCOLN MERCURY 

21531 Mich. Ave. 274-8813 


1968 PONTIAC CATALINA 
CONVERTIBLE V6 automatic* 
power steering & brakes, radio, 
wh.tewalls Red wdh a white top. 
A MUST SEE" SALE PRICED 
$1195 

is Mark 

CHEVROLET 
33200 Michigan Ave. 

722-9147 

1971 FORD F-100 

Pickup eight cylinder. Sport 
custom cab 

$2195 

ATCHINSON 

FORDSALES&SERVICE 
9800 Belleville Rd Belleville 

697-9161 728-1555 


1967 BUICK LcSabro • $795 

Automatic, power steering a 
brakes rad.o R.q car > -de 

HAROLD DIETRICH 

BUlCkOPfL 7?I3»7$ 

33173 Michigan Ave Wayne 


1971 UUSTANG COUPE V 9 
automatic, power steer -ng rado 
wti.tewalls n.idiun* blue with 
matching interior SALE PR I CEO 
$209 S 

is Mark 

CHEVROLET 
33260 Michigan Ave 

722-9147 

15a. Sports- 

Foreign Cars 


D.iKihi S 10 W.i« 4 ©n .n stork 
\f WHAv DA TSUN 
HI M.ih.tia" Yp\i 46? 68 SO 

iv M VW SUNROOF $169s 
SUBURBAN VOl K SWAGE N 
.Hat W.ivhten.ew Vpst j 14 IWP 





Page 10 


A PANAX PUBLICATION 


Wednesday, July 5, 1972 


16. Trucks-Traller 
for Sale 


32. Help Wanted 


32. Help Wanted 


35. Situations Wanted 45. Music Lessons 


50. Pets 


50. Pets 


15. Autos for Sale 


15. Autos for Sale 


l?6t CHEVY TON VAN V8 
.-.utomai.c radio Rr-d 4 white r> 
color ONLY j; 000 MILES wth 
BALANCE of NE*V CAR 

.varoanty sale priced 
s»e«s 

Mark 

CHEVROLET 
33200 Michigan Ave 

722-9147 


18. Bikes-Motorcycles 


1970 S90 HONDA 

*225 t*7 0W6 


YAMAHA 
GREAT ESCAPE 
CONTEST 

Wm a motorcycle 
European Luxury tour 
Everyone wv>ns vjmethtng' 

Enter *odav at 

A & D MOTOR CO 

16018 Huron River Dr. 
Romulus 941-1912 


WESTERN. 

WAYNE 

COUNTY’S 

LARGEST 

HONDA 

YAMAHA 

AUTHORIZED 

DEALER 

A & D MOTOR CO. 

16018 Huron River Dr. 
Romulus 941-1912 

20. Wanted: Auto 

I PICK UP JUNK CARS 

722-3244 


JUNK CARS WANTED any kind 
Fr « to.v’Vj mqn dollar paid 
CAPL S AUTO PARTS. 697 1501 
Call anytime 


ECOLOGY MINDED! 

Don t iunk mat car. i need it Top 
dollar paid. Tree pick up. 

E & M Auto Parts 
728-5580 


ABSOLUTE 

TOP DOLLAR 

PAIOFOR ANY USEDCAR 
CASH ON HAND AT ALL TIMES’ 
CALL FOR FREE APPRAISAL 

JIM CHUMBLEY 

CHEVROLET 

1 HO E Mich Ave . YPSILANTl 

482-9111 

32. Help Wanted 

Security Guards 

;i yri cf aye. own transportation. 
Mohawk Security 720 1751 or 729 
2655 


BEAUTICIAN 

Male stylist, excellent earnings 
Artiste Salon. Westland Center 
42S 9510 


16. Trucks-Traller 
for Sale 


The motor 
home you 
use every 
day. 

Away from home, it's 
home At home, it's an 
everyday driving help. 
H's all you need for living 
in station wagon length. 
Built by avco and 
Dodge most ex- 

perienced ving-driving 
combination in motor 
homes. 



r 


Family Wagon Royale 
Starting from S4995 

College Dodge 

Truck Center 

1260 E. Michigan, Ypsilanti 

484-0600 


RNS NEEDED 

Apoly Nar»km Hospital at 35550 
Michigan Ave 721 77QO 


CASHIER 

SALESPERSON 

Mature person tor permanent 
position Apply m person 2912 S 
A/dvne Road Wayne 


MEN WANTED 

General Service Siat-on help 
Mechanical and wrecker e« 
oer ence Full T me Also part 
time openinqs available Apply .n 
person BAILEY S STANDARO 
SERVICE STATION 9201 M.d 
diebelt Romulus 946 7600 


EXPERIENCED HANDYMAN 
tor budding repairs, various 
trades 557 0770 


OPENING lor Welcome Wagon 
representatives In Westland 
Garden C'ty area Must lype 4 
have car Can Mrs Hall 961 77SO 


COUNTER MAN 

Enperienced part t.me tor 
bowi.ng alley, evemngs Call 72! 
7530 


C ULL TIME summer work 
min.mum age 17 above average 
earn. I*gs Can FULLER. 727 1188 
or apply 2010 S Wayne Road 9 
am 2pm daily 


GUARDS 

Full & part time Must furnish own 
uniform & transportation Apply 
22U8 Michigan Avenue. Room 209 
Dearborn between 9 t 


FULL T IME and part time help. 6 
10 pm S3 per hour, tor personal 
trier v ew can M r Hubbard at 326 

U20 

HOUSEWIVES 

Earn that needed extra income 
servicing Fuller Brush 

Customers it's a fun job and 
pro. 'table one Highest 

commissions paid For further 
information phone Carol at 72'* 
4433 


ATTRACTIVE! 

SSO per week lor housewives with 
children 728 3528 522 1560 


Part TimeWork 

Call between 9am 12. 729 9170 

MOTHERS 1 

• nave a iob tor you Weekly 
paychecks, local work 485 3798 

KEY PUNCH 
KEY TAPE 
OPERATORS 

Openings available for full time 
days, and full time and part time 
afternoons, tor experienced 
operators Paid vacation and 
holiday plan. pa>d hospitalization 
and insurance 

COMPUTER SERVICES 
CORP 

Dearborn 584 1470 
Dearborn Heights 274 6880 
An Equal Opportunity Employer 

ACT NOW Jom the oldest Toy and 
Gift Party Plan .n the Country our 
25th year’ Commissions up to 30 
percent Fantastic Hostess 
Awards Call or write SANTA'S 
PARTIES. Avon. Conn 06001 
Telephone 1 <203 ) 673 3455 ALSO 
BOOKING PARTIES 

BEAUTICIANS 

Experienced beautician, part Time 
or full time Cali Me Lon's 728 
6220 Call Thursday Saturday 

COLLEGE STUDENT 

To DO SUMMER SALES WORK 
WITH NEWSPAPER BOYS 
MUST BE RESPONSIBLE AND 
HAVE CAR HOURLY WAGE. 
MILEAGE. ANO BONUS SET 
UP ASK FOR DEAN THUR 
MONO 

729-4460 


13. Autos for Rent 


LONG ON 
FAMILY DRIVERS, 

SHORT ON 
FAMILY CARS? 


Rent-a-Fordfromus! 
When everybody wants 
the family car at once, 
you've got a problem . and 
we've got the answer. 
Rent a car! 

Just let us know what you 
want and when you want 
it. Our rates include in- 
surance. 


RENT-ACAR 


ATCHINS0N FORD SALES, INC. 

mao BELLEVILLE HP 
Bellmtlr 

1697-9161 728-1555 

SPECIAL WEEKEND 
RATES! 


waitress Full t.me e» 
Ojr.cnced or Will Iran top pay 
Acoly F ioq 5 F ne= Fooo 
Bouev He u55 BeDevlie Road 
Cm ol I 94 » way 


PARTS MAN 

E»perienced desired. no* 
necessary Apply m person UO 
Motor Company 16018 Huron 
R ver Or Romulus or call Mr 
Burke 941 1912 


be a winner ano join the 

UNBEATABLE* Just by havng 
• un you can earn $10 an hr 
Show-ng lovely Queen S Way to 
fashion ciothinq w.gs and 
lewniry K • furnished No coll no 
del Over 21 For .nlor , call Fran 
425 7781 or Pat 476 5174 

REAL ESTATE 
90 percent 
COMMISSION 

REVOLUTIONARY NEW plan 
We are expanding here *s the 
opportunity to earn large com 
missions No ad costs no Paper 
work Member of UNRA Multi 
L-st Personal interview call Mr 
Carleton or Mr Bentz 261 1010 

CARELTON REALTY 

201?? Plymoi/lh R L.von.a 

GUYS & GALS 

SINGLE ONLY 

National Company now hiring 10 
recent high school grads to join 
congenial group Must be neat 
smqle and ambitious Above 
average earn.ngs Salary plus 
commission $500 annual bonus 
New cars furnished Contact 874 
3474 


35. Situations Wanted 


Ch.id Care. Inkster 
Can CR 8 019? 
$15 00 per child 


WILL BABYSIT 
WEEKLY 

Phyhss 4 Fourth St 729 5654 

Mother washes babysitting 
Days Or afternoons 
7?9 8240 

15a. Sports- 

Foreign Cars 


WE CARE 

ABOUT YOU & 
YOUR CAR! 

A big reason you'll find 
only the finest used cars 
available at Suburban 
VW 

70 VWK ARMAN 

GHIA S1795 

4 speed 

71 FORD TORINO $2095 
V 8, automatic, power 
steering 8. brakes 

'69 FORD 2dr hard 
top $1495 

'68 VW Square Back $1395 
'70 VW CAMPER $2995 
71 SUPER BEETLE 
4speed $1895 

'69 VW SQUARE 
BACK $1595 

Auto., 

71 VWSUNROOF $1895 
4 speed, SHARP! 

SUBURBAN 

VOLKSWAGEN 

Authorized VW Service & 
Sales 

2867 Washtenaw, Yp silanti 
434-3300 


15. Autos for Sale 


WE FINANCE 

1966 GALAX IE 
COUPE $287 

Vinyl top, V 8, automatic. 

1965 CHEVY $287 

Light Green, automatic 

1965 BUICK 

WILDCAT $387 

Full Power, gold, 
automatic f 

1963 DODGE 

4-door # $187 

White, red interior, 
automatic 

1965 TEMPEST 

2 -door $387 

Blue, automatic, power 

1966 OLDS 98 

HOLIDAY $387 

FULL POWER, 
automatic, vinyl top 

1967 CATALINA $787 

White, automatic, power 

70 MORE CARS TO 
CHOOSE FROM! 

ALPINE MOTORS 

NO CASH NEEDED- 
EZ TERMS 
33133 Mich. Ave. 728-9500 


Write Your Ad Below 

Mail to The Daily Eagle. 35540 Michigan Ave., Wayne, Mich. 

UP TO 14 WORDS 


^ LINES ^ DAYS 


05 


Include price in your ad to get the best results And price 
must be included to qualify for the SPECIAL FAMILY 
WANT AD RATE Also include your phone and-or address. 


NAME 


ADDRESS 
CITY* 


PHONE 

ZIP 


DON’T FORGET! ENCLOSE YOUR CHECK OR MONEY ORDER. 


Black GiRL. 24 ^xp er n in 
vurance personnel and office 
wants work 5at and Sun in 
i r**ter area Call >ft5 t’$6 after 6 
or 9ti 6400 in da? 


EVER READY AGENCY 
General house work and general 
hauling 722 STIO 


NEED A CARPENTER 7 
Any k.ndot work 
Any time 94) 0131 


CAPABLE RELIABLE babySilter 
Wshes lOb even.nqs 4 or 
weekends 427 1703 


I FINANCIAL 

40. Business 
Opportunities 


ROR LEASE ? bay service 
sia’ion. excellent opoortun.ly 
good location Stocked, ready tor 
huvmevs 721 9640 255 0550 455 

160 ? 


INSTRUCTION I 

45. Music Lessons 


Piano and or$an lessons in your 
home 37 years experience 721 
J586 by Stanford G Walling 

MUSIC LESSONS PIANO. 
ORGAN GUITAR Experenced 
teachers Wayne Music Center 
PA 1 7535 


15. Autos for Sale 


CADILLAC 

1968 SEDAN 
DEVILLE 

4dr., Gold, black vinyl 
roof 8. gold interior. AM 
FM stereo, 6 way power 
seat, power locks, climate 
control AIR $2495 

1965 SEDAN 
DEVILLE 

Climate control AIR, 
cruise control, power 
locks, seats, windows. & 
MORE! You must see this 
car to believe it! ONLY 
$1295 

1 967 COUPE 
DEVILLE 

Green, black interior & 
black vinyl roof, power 
seats & windows, climate 
control AIR ONLY $1695. 

SPECIAL 

1971 PONTIAC GRAND 
VILLE 4 dr Sedan 
Rosewood, black cloth 
interior & black vinyl 
roof. Power windows, 
trunk, steering & brakes. 
FACTORY AIR. SALE 
S3 395. 

P.C. Chapman & Son 

PONTIACCADILLAC 

'Ypsilanti's Oldest 
New Car Dealer' 

Open Mon & Thurs. 

Eves 'tit 9 p m. 

15 E. MICHIGAN AVE. 
483-0322 


enroll now for music 

LESSONS 1 Piano organ guitar 
accord'd" 4 drums All wmo 4 
brass instruments' Private 
instruction by experienced 
teachers $3 per lesson Rentals 
available 

Westland Music Center 

34711 Ford Rd 729 2040 


46. Private Instruction 


EXPERIENCED ElEMEN 
Tary tutor n ma»n 6 reading 
Cali J5S 7572 


FREE PUPPIES 

cute piaylul 5 wks old to oood 
homos 779 6390 


2 Female Poodles 

i r pd cjooa home 4 space $50 4 $75 
No papers ?9?8I1? 


TOY POODLE 

White Mai*- AKC f weeks old $50 
OX 7 8234 


’•ERMA N SHFPHERDS AkC 
S25 up Z* usberg Kennels Call 
alter 6 p m 149 4539 


13. Autos for Rent 



North Bros. 

RENT-ACAR 

Leasing 


R ENT-A-New 72 FORD 

by the 

DAY • WEEK • 

NORTH BROS. 

LEASING 



MONTH 


RENT-A-CAR 


421-0982 


33300 FORD RD. 937-0010 


15a. Sports- 

Foreign Cars 


The Dalsun 510 
is a champion, 
life also a wagon. 



Datsun 510 Sedan. Winner: 

1970 East African Safari. W inn er: 

1971 2.5 Trans-Am championship. 
Datsun 510 is also available 

as a wagon, with lots of the feature! 
that help us win races. Overhead 
cam engine. Safety front disc brakes. 
Solid unibody construction. Plus, 
comforts you expect: all-vinyl 
interior. Tinted glass. Whitewalls. 
And more, included in the price. 

If you need a hard-working 
wagon, drive Datsun 510. It sure beats 
whatever 'a second. 

DATSUN 

FROM NISSAN WITH PRIDE 

Serbay Datsun 

34 E. Michigan, Ypsilanti HU 2-8850 


% 


4 


j 22*. 





'm&m 




Used Car Warranty 


This warranty will apply *• tb* vahicla paw«r train <em pa- 
nant* Specifically (1) Tha Cylinder Black, Haari, All Internal 
Infirm Parti, Watarpump an! Intaka Manifold. (2) Trent- 
minion and Internal Parti, including Torque Converter. (3) 
Drive ihoft and Universal Joint*. (4) Rear Axle, Differential 
and Axle Shaft*.) 

The Dealer afreet to moke neceiiary repair* Vo theta cam- 
ponentt, at hit place of businau (614 Ann Arbor Road, 
Plymouth, Michigan) at NO CHARM for a period of 12 
MONTHS or 12,000 MILES, wh*chovor occur* fi ret from date 
of delivery. 


Buy one of our FINE USED CARS AND GET A WRITTEN GUARAN- 
TEE that compare* with any new model. We have over 100 selected 
used cart that quality (or our used car warranty. 

BUY ONLY FROM US AND BE SURE 
YOU CET THIS PROTECTION! 


BEGLINGER-MASSEY 
CADILLAC 453-7500 

684 ANN ARBOR RD. 

IN PLYMOUTH CORNER OF MAIN 



Standard Poodle 

leffl.le blatt. AKC 941 S98S 


BOARDING And groom. ng r> 
M.ch-gan s newest ano most 
modern kennel 697 9183 


Female Calico Kiiten 

needs home 42? 1255 alter 6 

professional 

OOG GROOMING 
all BREEDS Reasonable 
Call 270 5457 

BELLE AMI POOOLES 
Groom.nq 4 stud service Show 
0‘jrv.ty 4 akc pe«s for sale Cali 
Pat Fourn.er a* 52? 2547 

KREE KITTENS-2Cals 

to a good home 728 7798 

ST BERNARD Pupp.es AKC 
Call after 4 30 928 0753 Male and 
Females $i$Q 

BOUVIER de FLANDERS 
Proven stud for sate AKCreq 563 
7875 alter I 30 


15. Autos for Sale 


For Your Transportation 
Needs Call 

HUGH BETTS 

AT 

Belleville's Largest 
Ford Dealer 

New or Used CARS 8. True ks 


ATCHINSON FORD 

C07Q1C1 9800 Belleville Rd 

Dtl/'jlOl Belleville 




Irk 


728-1555 


. . BRUCE CRMG 1 V : FONTIAC 

*tl " 7 J * 


g °t 5RQ 

NEED A CAR? 

YOU CAN BUY A 
CAR FROM US 
EVEN IF YOU: 

Are new in town 
Have not 
established credit 

THIS IS NO PUT-ON! 

We can. With Only $50 
Down Put You Into The 
Car of Your Choice! Give 
You A Monthly Payment 
You Can Afford WE 
HAVE 40 Models From 
Which You Can Choose 
All Makes and Models — 

18 YEAR OLDS! 

We now have a special 
finance plan designed 
especially tor your needs. 
Stop in and drive out in 
one of our late model 
reconditioned cars I 

B & M MOTORS 

33429 Mich. Ave., 
Wayne 

721-4510 721-4531 



NEW 


1972 PONTIAC 


OUR YEAR END SALE IS ON! 
Grandville Coupes 4 Doors Grand Prix Hardtops 
Catalina Coupes & 4 Doors Ventura Coupes & 4 


Doors 



275 NEW CARS 

IN STOCK TO 
CHOOSE FROM !! 

BRUCE CRAIG 

PONTIAC 453-2500 

874 Ann Arbor Rd.. Plymouth 


QQ 


OPEN YOUR EYES 
TO THESE 

USED CAR SAVINGS 


1969 Ford Country Squire 

Wagon, 10 pass, factory air, power 
steering & brakes, radio, white side 

walls, luggage rack. ‘1975 

1971 Ford Pinto 

4 speed, radio, white side wall tires. 
Deluxe Decor radio, gold, black 
interior SJ 575 

1968 Chevy Caprice 

Automatic, power steering. & brakes, 
vinyl top, tinted glass, gold with black top 
& gold interior. 

■1195 

1968 T-Bird 

Landau Coupe, automatic, power 
steering, brakes & windows, factory 

air, white, black top. *1995 
1971 Country Squire 

WAGON FACTORY AIR. power steering 
& brakes, stereo radio, white side walls, 

>3795 


1970 Ford XI Coupe 

Lime gold, vinyl top power 
steering & brakes, radio, white side 

wa,,s *1595 

1969 Mercury Marquis 

Brougham, dark blue, matching 

vinyl top and interior, radio, white 
side walls, factory air, power 
windows. 5 1995 

1971 Thunderbird 

LOADED!! Power Steering, Power 
Brakes Power Seats. Power Windows. 
Automatic, Stereo Radio, Vinyl Top, Air. 
JUST 12,000 MILES!! . -- Ar 

*4195 

1970 T-Bird Coupe 

Automatic, power steering & 
brakes, stereo radio, tilt wheel, 
power windows & seats, green, 

matching vinyl top. *3395 

1971 Ford Mustang 

Coupe, automatic, power steering & 
brakes, radio, white sidewalls, grey 

black top. V -8 *2575 



Stuart Wilson 


23535 Michigan at Outer Drive 

LO 1-0500 



NEW 

MUSTANGS 

ALL MODELS 
IN STOCK 
ON SALE! 


NEW 

Tudor 

PINTO 

AS LOW AS $1895 
Std. Factory 
Equip. 


325 BRAND NEW CARS & TRUCKS AT LOW YEAR END PRICES!! 


NOBODY BEATS A SPITLER DEMMER DEAL 


* plus sales tax 


FORD 


SPITLER-DEMMER 


37300 MICHIGAN AVE AT NEWBURGH 


LOU HANK K \ II S 
Fast Uroilil V|>|>roval 


721-2600 







Wednesday, July 5. 1972 


A PANAX PUBLICATION- 


Pige 11 


5#. Pets 


50. Pelt 


54. Poultry-Livestock 61. Miscellaneous 


67. Garden Plants 
& Supplies 


70. Household Goods 70. Household Goods 73. Music Merchandise 


77. 


POOOLE GROOMING 

CAiRN Terrier, AKC Champion 

APPOINTMENTONLY 

bred 

male, t female, 9 wks 

CALL PL 3 4346 


728 8783 

GERMAN SHORT 

HAIRED POINTER 

54. 

Poultry-Livestock 


HO ' i moon porrof with cage $70 

722 )604 

St. Bernard Pups 

$50 up Pet. Show. & Greeting 
(Terms) "Oeurs Saints". 
Fremont 1 616 9?4 3566) 


CHICKS. OUKLINGS. gosling*, 
guineas Peacocks, pigeons, 
doves, laying hens Deer, donkeys, 
ponies, goats sheep, rabbits Hay, 
straw, teed Antique buggies 
13475 Mitfdiebett. Romulus 941 
4473 


15. Autos for Sale 



NEW 1972 TOYOTA CARINA . 

Deluxe 2<)oor NEVER LICENSED OR TITLED, 
FULL FACTORY WARRANTY. Automatic, FAC- 
TORY Al R CONDITIONING, tinted glass, disc brakes, 
near window defroster, vvtiltewalls & MOR E EXTRAS! 
Save On This Lovely Car! 

SPECIAL ~ ’2895 


1967 BUICK 

ELECTRA Two door 
Hardtop. FULL POWER, 
FACTORY AIR. 
automatic, vinyl root. 

SALE $1295 


1968 KARMAN GHIA 

Coupe. ONE OWNER 
EXTRA CLEAN! 

SALE $1295 


1966 FAIRLANE 
Nice Ford tudor hardtop. 
ONE OWNER. 6-cylinder, 
automatic, power 
steering, turquoise with 
white vinyl roof. Ex- 
cellent cond. -low milage. 
SALE SI 295 


1967 PONTIAC 

Gitallna two door hard 
top. AIR CONDITIONED, 
EXTRA CLEAN! 

SALE $995 


P. L GRISSOM & SON 

7227100 


33020 Michigan 

Wayne 




L. to R.; Woody Daniels, Clyde Hale, Lou Ferrante, 
Mr. Pirate Dog, John Folger, Bryan Gibson 

OUR SALESMEN TRY HARDER!! 

•EXPERIENCE COUNTS- 


1971 COUNTRY SQUIRE WAGON 


10-PASSENGER, V-8, Automatic. Power 
Steering & Brakes. FACTORY AIR CON- 
DITIONING. Silver Finish with Red Vinyl In- 
terior. SHOWS EXCELLENT CARE! SAVE SS 


1970 T-BIRD LANDAU 

Tudor, v*8, automatic, 
power steering & brakes. 
FACTORY AIR, AM FM 
Stereo, Burgandy finish 
with black vinyl roof. 
SHARP AS A TACK! 
S2995. 


1970 MACH I 
MUSTANG Tudor, V-8. 
automatic, (351-GV) 
power steering. Sharp 
olive green with black 
accent paint & Matching 
vinyl interior. A REAL 
LOOKER! SAVE!! 



1970 FORD LTD BROUGHAM 


FACTORY AIR CONDITIONING, V-8, 
Automatic, Power Steering 8, Brakes. White 
Finish with Blue Cloth Interior & Black Vinyl 
Roof. EXTRA CLEAN!! SOLID BUY at $2395. 


1969 CLUB WAGON 

Big '6' engine, automatic, 
5-passenger. Extra 
Sharp! Perfect for 
Camping. $1695. 


1971 MERCURY CAPRI 

2000 CC Engine, 4 speed, 
radial ply tires, white 
with black vinyl root. 
Sporty Luxury at the 
RIGHT PRICE-S1995. 



1970 FORD RANGER PICKUP 


V 8, Automatic, Power Steering & Brakes, 
Radio, West Coast Mirrors, Tool Compartment, 
Rear Step Bumper. SAVE $$ 


1971 F100 PICKUP 
Sport Custom, V 8. 
automatic, power 
steering, radio, 2-tone red 
6 white finish, 
**iitewalls, wheel covers, 
rear step bumper, west 
coast mirrors. SAVE!! 


1970 FORD LTD 
COUNTRY SQUIRE 1& 
PASSENGER WAGON, 
V 8, automatic, power 
steering & brakes. The 
right vacation car for the 
right price! $2195. 



1971 FORD PINTO 


Automatic. Bright Gold with Vinyl Roof & Sporty 
Interior. SUMMER SALE PRICED at $1595. 


SPITLER-DEMMER 


DIRECT FACTORY AUTHORIZED DEALER 
37300 MICHIGAN AVE. at Newburgh 

1-2600 WAYNE L0 2-9500 

Hours Daily ‘Til 6 PM 
Mon. & Thurs. Til 9 PM Sat. ‘Til 6 PM 


GROWN Muscovy & pekln ducks 
$7 guinea bens $2 50 Mallard 
ducks $1 50 baby mascovy ducks 
50. laying bens it 50 753 905t 


REGISTERED QUARTER 
HORSE. 5 years old. mare, very 
qentie Appaloosa stud. tS month 
old colt 779 4936 


BABY MUSCOVY ducks, 50c baby 
guineas 75c grown geese $6 
Grown muscovy ducks. $7 18346 
Mecriman. Romulus 753 9051 


A Q H A QUARTER HORSES 4 
H prospects 6 year old gelding, 
yearling, filly, weanling stud 
Reasonable 483 1632 


55. Riding Hor set- 
SUblet 


BOARDING SPACE tor 2 horses 
or ponies $35 a month 
728 9470 


5 YEAR OLD mare, saddle & 
bridle good family horse $250 753 
9051 


MERCHANDISE 1 


61. Miscellaneous 


LOSE WIGHT with New Shape 
Tablets and Mydrex Water Pills 
Kirk's Orug Store, Belleville 


KITCHEN CABINETS 25 C»|erry 
oak & walnut, cupboard doors, 
custom built counter fops Never 
used Altered to fit. Sell 
separately Dealers welcome 425 
2880 


FORMICA. 1200 sheets, all sues, 
colors. •> usual prices Others 
cabinets making supplies Dealers 
welcome 425 2880 7 22 9792 


GAS DRYER & Mangle $25 

941-5484 after 6 


BELLEVILLE AREA 
DISCOUNT PRICES 

30 per cent off wood cabinets 
Delta faucets $18 99 
Laundry tubs $16 95 
Formica vanities $49 88 
Stainless sinks $24 88 
While toilets. $29 88 
Range hoods. $24 88 
Bathtubs $49 88 
Well Pumps $99 99 
Shower stalls $44 88 
MATHISON HARDWARE CO 
61 30 Canton Center Road 
1 « mile N of Ford. Plymouth. Mi 
Phone455 9440 


HI NEIGHBOR* Tried Blue 
Lustre for cleaning carpets? It's 
super* Rent electric shampooer 
for only $1 D * D Hardware 4621 
S Wayne Road at Annapolis. 
Wayne 


YARD SALE 

Toys clothes, misc household 
QOOds 758 Den ice. Westland Wed 
Thurs 9 5 

BABY CRIB Stroller high chair 
combination $20 each or $30 takes 
all 697 7317 alter 5.30 pm 

RUMMAGE SALE 

Thurs Frl, July 6 * 7 36041 Glen 
All day 

Juliette am FM 

mpx with built In 8 track, like new 
$100 729 6777 


USED TIRES, all sites $5 thru $10 
Also truck and snow tires. sIlQhlly 
higher. 729 5795 


ROOF VENTS 

2 tor $15 

Rooting. siding. gutters 
Guaranteed workmanship Phone 
941 6557 


12x20 Oval Pool 

) year old. complete All you need 
.s water 5550 721 5371 

Couch. Mr * Mrs Chairs good 
cond Pool table $85 729 4622 


Fish worms 

Corner Shook & Menton. Romulus 

GOLO VELVET reciiner. 2 piece 
turquoise wooden sectional, 
oranqe colonial sofa bed. gold and 
qreen chair Throw pillows. 728 
6153 


CLEANINGEST CARPET cleaner 
,ou ever used, so easy too Get 
Blue Lustre Rent electric 
••hampooer $1 Hamilton Pro 
Hardware 


LIONEL TRAIN set complete with 
tressei set Mounted on 4 x 8 board. 
$50 Also 12 lb bowling ball, otter 
728 5199 


MOVING MUST SELL Boy's 26' 
b*ke stroller. 6 yr crib & chest, 
sand bo*, slide hobby horse, 
mmi motorcycle, lawn roller 
L«med Oak o-ntng set. antique 
European clock and more 159S6 
Wahrman. Romulus July $6 7 
941 5669 


INOOOR' OUTOOOR' CARPET 

NOW$1.49persq.yd. 

12' X 12 va self stick title 25c ea 
APMSTPONG Cushioned Vinyl 
Flooring St 99 sq yd 

Plastic Wall Tile lcea. 

C»YamicTile 39c ea 

Linoleum Yard Goods 
6 9 12 it wide) 69c sq. yd 

36 " Window Shades $1 

While La*ex Paint 
>4 Gallons) $9 

9» 12 Linoleum Rug $5 99 

INKSTER LINOLEUM CO 
27)08 Michigan A ve Inkster 
562 1140 


BASEMENT SALE Odd dressers, 
aquarium, infant 6 baby clothes 
and furniture, children's clothes, 
misc items Starts Thursday Bet 
ft. 6 33995 Glover. Wayne 

SPECIAL — Racine Dry Carpet 
Shampoo Use room right away! 
$3 per day rental on easy to use 
machine * shampoo ABLE 
MENTAL. 31827 Mich . Wayne 
721 8442 


SAVE MUCHO DOLLARS 
SEE CRAZY JACK 

SAVE! -SAVE! -SAVE! 

ALL HOUSEHOLD ITEMS ON 
SALE' NEW ITEMS ARRIVING 
WEEKLY! WE UN 

CONDITIONALLY GUARANTEE 
YOU CAN’T BUY CHEAPER 
ANYWHERE*' EVERY ITEM IS 
BRAND NEW SURPLUS ANO 
PRICED WAY BELOW 
OISCOUNT* 

OPEN OAILY 105 FRI & SAT 
TILL 8 FLEA MARKET SAT ft. 
SUN 

DETROIT SURPLUS CENTER 
8000 WEST CHICAGO PHONE 
933 1520 

1966 El Camino pick up truck, 
power steering, low mileage. $795 
1957 Skyline Mobile trailer. 8 x 30 
$495 Gold chair. 2 pc green 
sectional. 1 double. I single bed. 2 
TVs $5 and $15 Phone 485 8263 


GARAGE SALE 

6240 Middlebelt Garden City 
Hurry. hurry) Clothes 
miscellaneous, mornings to dark 

AUTO OWNERS! 24 80 quarterly 
buys $70,000 $40,000 liability 
property damage TU 1 2376 

BLACK PERSIAN Lamb Paw 
Coat 


$300 


697-0583 


VINYL FLOOR TILE 
INSTALLED 

108 sq. ft. Includes labor & mil. 
$69 95. Call LO 2 138796p m 

CB RADIO 

25 channel 600 A with turner desk 
mike used once, cost $296 will 
sacrifice of $165 or will trade for 
used car HU 2 1779 


AIR CONDITIONER. G.bson Air 
Sweep, thermostatic control. 6.000 
BTU’S $100 772 6981 


CERAMIC WALL TILE 
installed 5‘x6'x4‘ high $159 
CALL LO 2 13879 6p m 

GARAGE SALE 

39714 Dillingham Weslland 
Wednesday Thursday 10 5 


SWIMMING POOL. 74 x 48 
complete, new filter Call alter 6 
pm 728 5623 

M. Farm & 

Dairy Products 

70 ACRES of standing hay 9685 
RawsonviHe Road. Belleville HO 
I 1177 


32. Help Wanted 


REAL ESTATE SALES 
SALESMEN & MANAGEMENT 

Experienced men or we will train you on the job 


• Real Estate training to help you get started. 

• Large progressive company. 

• Dynamic sales force. 

• Up to 80 percent commission. 

• No floor time, no fixed hours. 

• Ojr men earn $10,000 to $30,000 

Join our staff of self-employed professionals. Excellent 
management potential. Call Jerry Barr 522-2900. 



WANTED 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 
FOR BUSINESS SERVICES 

The School District of the City of Inkster has an 
immediate opening tor a capable person to assist the 
Business Administrator, with duties in the areas of 
accounts payable, data processing, computer 
programming, budget control, supply management 
and financial accounting and reporting. 

Applicants must be able to meet all of the following 
minimum education and experience requirements: 

1. A bachelor's degree in business administration. 
Preference will be given to a candidate with a maj or in 
accounting. 

2. Completion of at least one formal course in com- 
puter programming in one of the standard program 
ming languages. Preference will be given to a can- 
didate who has worked at the level of a programmer in 
an actual computer installation. 

3. One year of responsible experience in the 
preparation of financial reports and the keeping of 
financial records of moderate complexity. 

This Is a 52 week position offering a starting salary in 
excess of $10,400 per annum, depending on the person's 
qualifications. 

If you qualify, send complete resume and an ap^ 
plication letter to: 

Dr. Romeo D. Brion 

Business Administrator 

School District of the City of Inkster 

29115 Carlysle 

Inkster, Ml 48141 


Plants for sale Late cabbage 
cauMiower red cabbag** broc 
coll Brussels sprouts by hundred 
or thousand, and late tomato 
plants 10405 Pardee Taylor 
Township north ot Goddard Road 
Phone 791 7379 

68. Garden Produce 


HOMEGROWN MICHIGAN 

STRAWBERRIES 

By qt or case 

Ice Cold Walermelon 
PAUL'S MARKET 

1850 Nowburg. corner of Palmer 
WESTLAND 

729-8765 

SALEU-PICK 
STRAWBERRIES 
20c lb i qt . Equals 1 1 2 lbs ) 
Free Containers Furnished 

SAYER'S 

RED BARN 

market 

On Ecorse Rd I mile west ol 
Haggerty open 7 00 AM III dark 
778 3763 

70. Household Goods 


GE Elec Stove 

$55 white Call 778 1460 


FORMICA Breakfast Set 

4 chairs $70 , 778 8553 alter It am 


Recreational 

Vehicles 


UNCLAIMED LAYAWAYS, buy 
lor balance owing Barr Furn 
32639 Ford Rd GA 7 3330 


POPULAR FURNITURE 
Quality at Quantity Prices 
75 E M.ch Ave Ypsi HU 3 0101 


16 Elec ranae with 20" oven 

Reas 722-2269 

SALE UNCLAIMED LAYAWAYS 
BEVERLY FURNITURE 
1980 Mich . Ypsi 482 4013 

School plan Ranges 

Replace your gas range with a like 
new Magic Chef or Roper All 
r oiors available al $100 less than 
original price Open Friday 
**ven,ngs till 9 

Consumers Power Co. 

11801 Farmington Rd , Livonia 
427 5100 


30" Tappan Gas Range 

Can 7?2 101) morn or eves 


Couch. $70 Dinette se*. $95 
Double bed complete. $78 
Bureau $30 567 5117 


CARPET-41 YDS. 

Brand new avocado green $135 
355 3433 

REPOSSESSED FURNITURE. 3 
rc*oms like new Balance of 
5761 40 No money down take over 
payments $3 per week delivers 
Seeing .s believing INKSTER 
FURNITURE MART. 77614 
Michigan Ave . inkster 


70. Household Goods 


WAREHOUSE DISCOUNT FURNITURE, INC. 



Couch $39.95 

Bunk Bed $49.95 

Bed Frame $4.95 


Twin or Full Sized Mattress $17.95 

3 pc. Walnut Bedroom Set . $89.95 

5 pc. Dinette Set $49.95 

2 pc. Living Rm. Set $89.95 

Open 9:30- 9 p.m. Mon. through Sat. 

11-5 p.m. Sunday 


24101 ECORSE RD. Near Telegraph 


56 Love seat, tweed, rust * brown 

$75 Excellent condition Ex 
pandomatlc desk dining room 
table j teats plus table pad 
Walnut Opens to 81 Like new 
$75 774 0970 

JULY CLOSEOUT 

Motorola Color TVs at Savings 
5 pc dinettes $49 95 

7 pc Living room sets from $109 95 

3 pc Bedroomset with box springs 

4 Mattress $149 95 

BUNK Si Trundles from $49 95 
Sofa Beds from . $69 95 

COME AND BROWSE ARqjJND 

BARR FURNITURE 

32639 Ford Rd 
GA 7 3330 


WAREHOUSE PRICES 

On reciinerv swivel and platform 
rockers, davenports and chairs, 
hide a beds and bedroom suites 
SANCH’S AUCTION, 7886 
Belleville Rd OPEN DAILY. 10 
am to 6 pm Closed Sunday OX 
7 1771 

73. Music Merchandise 


LOWREY ORGAN prices start at 
$595 WAYNE MUSIC CENTER. 
35164 Michigan. Wayne PA 17535 

RENT NEW LOWREY organ, 
with option to purchase. FREE 
LESSONS Wayne Music Center, 
35164 Michigan. Wayne PA l 7535 


ACCORDIAN - 120 Bass 

goodcond $700 771 7758 

RENT BRAND NEW Story and 
Clark piano, $2 per week plus 
cartage FREE LESSONS Wayne 
Music Center. 35164 Michigan. 
Wayne PA 1 7535 


75. Boats and 
Accessories 


15 Fiberglass boat, 40 hp 
Evmrude trailer and cover. $700 
721 6995 

14' i' Fibergias Boat 
trailer, motor, skiing equipment 
729 1530 

19' CALIFORNIA ski & drag boat 
wilh trailer 440 Chrysler motor 
Best offer $3,200 527 1674 

77. Recreational 
Vehicles 

22' Travel Master • 

like new. many extras 778 7293 
ART TRAILER SALES 

BANNER BONANZA 

TRAVEL TRAILERS 

REESE DRAWTITE 

HITCHES 
36724 Goddard Rd 
WHitney 1 0970 


70. Household Goods 


WAYNE HOME OUTFITTERS 


K^“jSS SAVE NOW!! 

2PC.Liv.Room $ 99.00 CLEARANCE SALE 

4 PC. BEDROOM SET $99.50 

5 PC. Dl NETTE, table & 4 chairs S29.95 

4 PC. HOLLYWOOD twin size complete U 9.95 
TWIN or FULL size mattress or box springs - 

mismatched ea. $21.50 

RECLINERS- Man'sslze 544.50 

9'x12' Living rm. Rugs $39 

(ALL NEW — IMMEDIATE DELIVERY) 

Open Moo -Thurs 81 Frl ‘til 9 p.m. 

Toes Wed & Sat 'til 6 p.m. 


32334 Michigan Ave. 
90 Days Same As Cash 


BRAND NEW 

1971 OPEN ROAD CAMPER 
U FT SLIOE IN. FULLY SELF 
CONTAINEO Complete With 
Pickup Just $4795 

Les Stanford 

TRUCK CENTER 
LO 3 0994 21711 Mich . Dbn 


hardtop POP— UP camper, 
1970 Furnace, double tanks, sink, 
stovo. canopy, spare wheel «ryj 
tire Battery pack and ice box, 
$825 PA 1 8177 


74. Sporting Goods 


\ peeaway 

^ TRAIL BIKES 

^DUNE BUGGIES 

^ GO KARTS 

± THREE 
^ WHEELERS 

RUTTMAN 

MINI-BIKES 


SMALL ENGINE PARTS 
AND SERVICE 



PORTSLAND 


41700 MICHIGAN AVE 
326-1632 


GOT A JOB TO BE DONE? LET EXPERTS DO IT! 





Landscaper 



Builder 



Carpet Cleaner 



Electrician 



CHECK "SERVICES" TODAY 


Alum. Siding 


ALUMINUM SIDING, trim, 
gutters, storm windows and doors 
Lie and ms Work myself Dennis 
572 5551 day or night 


ALUMINUM SIDING 
GUTTERS 
TRIM 

Milam Home Improvement 

728-8520 

Appliance Repair 


SEWING MACHINES cleaned and 
adiusfed all makes Work 
guaranteed 94t 3188 Free est 


Asphalt Paving 

Stevens Asphalt Paving 
Residential Work 

REPAIRS & SEALCOATING 

453-2965 


M 6 M Asphalt Paving 
Seal coating big or small free 
estimates Work guaranteed. 485 
3936 


Bathroom Remodeling 


COMPLETE REMODELING 
BATHROOMS & KITCHENS 
KEN FISHER 721 3255 


Carpenter 


CARPENTER 

ALL AROUND HANDYMAN 
Call alter 5 PM 722 0484 


Cement Work 


We fix all cracks 

m basement walls. 722 3636 


F & W CONCRETE 

Specialtie in Driveways ft. Patios 

“We Beat All Prices !“ 

Ypsilanti Free Est 48 5 7843 

Belleville 697 9877 


CONCRETE WORK, driveways, 
porches, etc rubbish hauled 
Licensed, tree estimates 722 4657 


CEMENT WORK. patios, 
driveways. Moors. 22 yr 
experience, licensed Free 
estimates GA 1 5987 


06 R CONSTRUCTION CO 
STATE LICENSED 
Driveways, sidewalks. pat«os. 
porches, footings, etc Free 
estimates Call 721 0347 


BRUNO S CEMENT 

Garages. Driveways. Patios. 
Porches 

FREE ESTIMATES 

584-6115 OR 274-7455 


Carpet Cleaning 


TOWNSMEN S KARPET STEEM 
Sleam clean your carpet »he safe 
thorouqh way Reas 722 7383 


Metro Carpet 6 Uphol Clng avQ 
tiv dm rooms 6 hall $29 Sofa 
cha<r $20 Steps 50c Dry loam 
Satis, guar 722 7989 


Driving Schools 


ALL POINTS 

AGES 16 II. air cond cart 
Beginners Brush ups, patient 
instructors. 729 2100 Dial us 
you'll like u$. 


Electrical 


LICENSED ELECTRICIAN. 100 
amp circuit breaker service $195 
FHA corrections BRATCHER. 
722 0037 


Excavators 


X M. Tort I Construction 
Water Sewers Basements 
Finished grading Call 72945M 


WM P STEWART 
&SON 

EXCAVATORS 

Fully insured and licensed. 
Residential and commercial 
697 437 lor 697 1681 


MARTIN EXCAVATING, sewers 
8. water, footings, weed mowing, 
grading, fop soil. & stone hauled 
728 6333 


Andy's Excavating 
Water, sewer lines installed 
Sand, stone & gravel hauled 
Bulldozing 
0 X 7 8341 


SAM MOYER EXCAVATING 
Belleville area sewer & wafer 
lead 697 7097 


Fences 


D*R CONSTRUCTION CO 
STATE LICENSED 
Cham link fences installed & 
repaired Free est 721 0347 


Hauling 


Home Improvement 


CARPENTRY WORK 
PAINTING & ROOFING 
No job too small PA t 3489 


I SPECIALIZE in room additions 
and modernization ot all types 
Please get my free estimate and 
check my past work and 
reputation before you decide to 
build or remodel. 

DENNIS E. FERRELL 

LicnMd »rv) Insured 

BUILDER 

522 5551 OAY or NIGHT 


Insurance 


ECONOMY RATES, home auto. 
Church, non drinkers onty 
Preferred Risk Mutual insurance 
Co Agent Robert a Webster 
35028 Elm. Wayne 722 6853 


CLYDE COX 
AGENCY 

SIS Main St. 

BELLEVILLE 

697-8036 


Kitchen Remodeling 


Plasterers 

PLASTERING. AND dry wall, 
guaranteed, immediate service. 
Call William Duty. PA 1 2412 


PLASTERING* DRV WALL 
NEW* REPAIR WORK 
721 1899 


PLASTERING* DRY WALL 
NO JOB TOO SMALL 
CALL BILL. 2611397 


QUALITY PLASTERING 
REASONABLY PRICED 
CALL PAT PA 1 0300 


Plumbing 


NEW * RSMOOELING; 
washrooms, water lines, elec 
sewer cleaning WM. STILES GA 
7 7266 


LOUIS B WILES 
Licensed Master Plumber 
Repairs & remodeling ot all types 
Call today 721 7373 


Remodeling 


MANSARO ROOF SPECIALISTS 
Building face lifts Stone Siding. 
729 0400 or 722 3646 


COMPLETE REMODELING 
BATHROOMS * KITCHENS 
KEN FISHER 721 3255 


SAVE Vi 

Give your kitchen a "new took"! 
I'll reface your cabinets with wood 
grain formica and fit new doors 
and counter top. Work mysetf Call 
Walt after 6 p.m. 422 0724 


J&C HAULING 

and moving Reasonable. 
273 2141 


RUBBISH REMOVAL 
Bushel to truckload 
261 9458 


HAULING SAND, gravel top soil 
and stone Delivered 941 2809 or 
941 9197. 


Home Improvement 


mars BUILDING CO . dormers, 
additions, kitchen, attic, etc free 
estimates 538 2666 


GENERAL REPAIR CO 

Carpentry. room additions, 
aluminum siding, aluminum 
windows & doors Call Jim at 

729-4345 326-2392 


FlELHAUER & SONS Roofing 
and Gutters, exp Free est 
Custom bars tor sale 722 0250 


Carpet Installation 


caw pet installation and repair 
FREE estimates 


911 -6225 or 


946-701 1 


HOME IMPROVEMENTS Ol all 
kinds dormers, additions, re c 
rooms and kitchens, rough or 
complete, licensed builder for 10 
years 29? 5950 


Improved Construction 
Geo Daunt. Contractor 

REC ROOMS. ADDITIONS. 
ROOFING SIDING ETC 
NO JOB TO SMALL* 

FREE ESTIMATES 434 359? 


Landscaping 


PLOWING, discing, roto tilling, 
Meld mowing, grading. Call Ron 
722 2964 


SHELBY RALEIGH. Contractor, 
back hoe work and trucking. Call 
48? 4309 (Ypsi ) 


Lawncare 


G&G LAWN CARE 
For COMPLETE 
SPRING CLEAN UP 

* UCHT rtOtOYILUNG 

* SOD STRIPPING 

* NEW SOD LAID 

9 SHRUB PLANTING 
9 TOPSOIL* SOD 
For Pree Estimate. 26) 3669 


Nursing Homes 


EASTL AWN CONVALESCENT 
HOME 

409 High St m Northyllle 

Dial i 349 oon 


Painters 


PAINTING INSIDE *OUT 
All work guaranteed" 
728 0642 


PAINTING 
Int * Ext 
Paper Hanging 
F«re repairs spec 

Office 261 1220 E mg 326 0432 
B HALL 

treeest Satisfactionguar 


Roofers 

REROOFING my speciality, work 
guaranteed. Call John Broome 

729-1068 GA 2-0201 


CHERARD'S ROOFING CO 
Roofing. siding. gutters, 
specialized hot roofing Free 
estimates 779 2690 


TUCKER roofing, res comm . 
repairs, tree est insured. Work 
guar 25 years experienced 421 
5930 


0*R CONSTRUCTION CO 
Roofing, gutters. * down spouts 
Free estimates 721 0347 


WAYNE ROOFING* GUTTERS 
ALLTYPESOF ROOFS 
AND REPAIRS721 7141 


Sod 


SOD 

Sycamore Farms is now cutting 
Merlon at 39049 Koppernick Rd. 
between Mix and Haggerty 


Trees 


GERALD DOWNS TREE 
SERVICE Trims, tops, removals 
100 per cent insured 753 9515 


BARKER S TREE EXPERT CO 
Trimming * removal, stump 
removal 522 0247 


EXPERTTREEWORK 

Removal Trimming Pruning 
Free Estimates 
Reasonable 

722-9017 728-3134 


Wallpaper 


CHARLIE S PAPER HANGING 
$5 00 per roll 
Phone 422 7218 


1st QueMy Wallpaper by FISHER 
Durable Vmyi 
Luxurious Flocking 
Pre pasted EZ to install 
QUIGLEY S PRO HARDWARE 
32653 Cherry Hill at Venoy 
PA 2 0056 


Wee d Cutting 

WEED CUTTING 

Commercial or residential 
LO 2 6430 









Pag*- 12 

77. Recreational 
Vehicles 


91. Apartments 
for Rent 


98. 


Mobile Home 
Space for Rent 


A PANAX PUBLICATION- 


SUMMER 

CLEARANCE 


W.nn^bago Trailers & Campers 
Pncea from 13500 fo 15000 
SPECIAL 8 O'Ckup camper 
sleeps 6 SlftS# 

SHIREY’S 

TRAILER sales 455 3769 
«05 Ann Arbor R<J IM U) Ply 


Ackley 2754 C-iy of Weitianq 

Beautiful 

Glenwood Gardens * 


2 BOR V BRiCK DUPLEXES 


$155 MONTH 


I ROOMS & BOM 


87. Rooms without 
Board 


BELLEVILLE AREA Rooms lor 
renf Gentlemen on I v Call Vic 483 
7430, eves 697 4929 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR RENT 


91. Apartments 
for Rent 


freshly pamfeo like brand new 
foil private basement 
Living room & dmmg area 
Refrigerator & range 
Your own lawn & garoen 
Storage i Laundry facilities 

Phone PA 1-8111 

Corner Glenwood and Ackley *j 
m.le norlh of Mcnigan 3 blocks 
east of Wayne Road 


105. Houses for Sale 105. Houses for Sale 105. Houses for Sale 105. House, for Sale 105. Houses for Sale 


NOW OPEN 

Belle Villa Estates 


Featuring 

C'u': I-Ouse healed pool lawn 
Arp «enceo storage area off 
'tree' park rvg and much more 


By Owner-Westland 

1 bedroom fr. level. ap 
pro* mat el y 2 000 square feet 
'■replace family room garage 
cyclone fence Owner leaving 
state Full price 124 900 Call 729 
6907 for appointment 


The VOST FOR YOUR 
VONTHlY rent in this AREA 


STARTER home 2 Bedroom 
0 On lie 500 easy terms 
SPENCER REALTY 274 2242 


Located in the City of Belleville 

Phone 699-2233 


WAYNE 

MORE FOR YOUR MONEY 
Large ; oedrm apt a r cond 
beautifully paneled living p.ning 
area Exceptional storage space 
ns deapt Ail utilities except elec 
1175 No children references pa 

I 50?t. 721 0453 


HR STINEHOUR 

Real Estate Co 697 8093 


APT FOR RENT utilities incl 

39112 Michigan Ave. 


LAKE VILLA APTS 
BELLEVILLE 


INKSTER-NORTH 

S1900 assumes sift 600 balance on 
mree bedroom t>nck front ranch 
and garage n mce condition 
Payments H87 per month lm 
med aic occupancy Cali 522 1023 


Brigman Helps People 

697 699 2022 


FREE 

Transportation to look at this 
three bedroom brick ranch dining 
room large living room, new floor 
cover-nq plus many more extras 
Call GEORGE METZ 
NORWOOD 52 2 2900 


THREE BEDROOM BRICK Full 
basement Ooorwail built ins 
Carpeting Altone 729 0400 


OAK BROOK COMMUNITY 
Ranches Colonials Tri levels 
MODEL PHONE 485 0060 


99. Will Share 


CALL US before selling your home 

ior tree appraisal Vanderburg 
Realty 261 1770 


APARTMENT AVAILABLE for 
two men to share >n Belleville 
area Call 697 4929 


BRIGMAN MOVES EM 

6” 2021 699 2022 


5 ACRES 

Bu.idable Land Nice area 
Washtenaw cty 110 900 12 000 On 

Justin McCaslin 

Yps.lanH 402 2707 


Wednesday, July 5. 19 72 

105. Houses for Sale 




call ON Your Action Broker' 
CURRAN 8. JOHNSON CR 4 1700 
Buy Sell Trade Real Estate 


INKSTER-SOUTH 

Small two bedroom frame home, 
garaqc, 1800 assumes low monthly 
payments ol 1141 immediate 
occupancy Call 522 1023 


GARDEN CITY -OWNER 

3 bedroom ranch home, carpeting, 
large kitchen Built in dishwasher 
and garbage disposal Partially 
finished basement 2* j car gar , 
Fru.t trees large lot 261 2684 


STARTER STEAL* 2 bedroom 
w.th basement a. garage SO 
Down under 1150 per mo 
CHERRY HILL INKSTER 
Lovely 3 bedroom br.ck bungalow 
F n shed basement bar. 2 car 
Qaraqc many extras CHAPMAN 
BROS REALTY, 52? 8600 


S300 ON FHA VA Terms 4 bdrm 
ranch Belleville. Rawsonville Rd 
483 7430. 557 0770, Jerome Bldrs 


TWO BEDROOM Alummum. 
fenced vacant on three lots on 
Washington St near Wayne 
1*4 000 on land contract 484 0747 


BUY-SELL— TRADE 

garlings realtors 

427 7797 or LU 2 6144 


PLYMOUTH 

Lovely air cond carpeted i bdrm 
ap* wth patio and large storage 
room tease 27e 9391 


NORWAYNE 

1 bedroom apartment s 1 10 plus 
security 7?9 2341 


2 bdrm apt unfurnished 1145 
monthly including all utilit.es 1145 
security rcQu-red Children 
welcome Located New Boston 
Call 753 4620 


WE LOVE SINGLES 
NEWLY’WEDS, 
CHILDREN 

* 2 3 bedrooms, furnished & un 
furnished, swim pool clubhouse 
playground equip lake good 
t>Shmg. boating 
BELLEVILLE ROADOPF I 94 
Can Bob or Pat Eivldge 

697-4100 


MODERN FURNISHED 1 bdrm 
apt 

941-1303 


ACKLEY. 2754 IN WESTLAND 
2 BEDROOM 1 STORY DUPLEX 
11!5 MONTH pa Mill 


NORWAYNE DUPLEX 2 bdrms, 
5140 month $U0 deposit 261 4476 
422 0591 


3 ROOM APT 

Furnished, quiet, adults with no 
pets Security deposit required 
778 2162 


APT TO SHARE 

20 30 yr old bachelor to share 
expenses o» Westland apt Thru 
August or re 'ease Call 729 9212 
after 6 


Fairchild Three bedroom 
brick w-th garage Fha $2i 900 
Rillston 846 1030 


BY OWNER vacant 7160 Dodge 
Pomulus L'k*-> new on two lots 
946 7620 or ?87 3348 


NEWBERRY -WAYNE 

3 bdrm tin bsmt 2 car gar 
large fenced cor lot Many extras 
729 1713 


CORBEN BUYS & SELLS 
FOR APPRAISAL 

562-8550 


557-1764 


VcFARLANE BROS 
Realtors Since 19?J 
GA 1 2400 


ASTA REALTY 
HOME OF 


THE PROFESSIONALS 
52? 3550 


Ma'e. college graduate. 24. desires 
roommate t 0 share 7 bedroom 
furnished apartment Contact 
Gary 292 0750, days. 721 2524 
evenmgs 


INKSTER SS0 down on easy 
terms Full basement gas heat 
dinmg room two bedrooms, Only 
515 9 50 Clean GROSSMAN LOS 
8840 Open eves Must sen 


LANO CONTRACT Small three 
bedroom home 1'; car garage 
corner lot 113 500 S7.000 down 
7?9 0793 


STEINHAUER AGENCY 
Real Estates insurance 

PA 1 4845 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 


GAPOEN CITY three bedroom 
bungalow t . baths garage. 
Agent 

728 4411 or 261 2316 


New 2-Bedroom Apts. 

JULY 1 


: bdrm unfurnished apt car 
pe’*ng dir conditioned Swimming 
pool 5155 per month includes all 
utilities except electocy adult 
only No pets Call 720 0699 after 2 
p m 


TO BE COMPLETED 

Some Ready for Immed Occ 
1145 mo no pets or cycles 
Mamed Couples only 
Children Welcome 
482 48?60r 402 1803 


DUPLEX 

n«ce ? bedrooms, call alter 4 30 
728 7279 


WAYNE FURN. 
HOUSETRAILERS 


104. Mobile Homes 
for Sale 


Just like a home only more 
convenient Call Monday thru 
Saturday between 10 4 30 p m 

Weekly rate, utilities Included 
PA 2 4343 Ext 7 



EVERY MOBILE 
HOME IN STOCK 
HAS BEEN 
REDUCED IN 
PRICE & THE BIG 
SALE IS ON!! 
STOP IN, COUNT 
YOUR SAVINGS, & 
SEE OUR HUGE 
SELECTION OF 
HOMES TO IN- 
CLUDE THE ALL 
NEW 1972 14 FT. 
WIDE FOR AS LOW 
AS 


$5850 


REE DEL & SET-UP 

WILLOW RUN 

MOBILE HOME SALES 

1631 E. Michigan 

(Open 9 to 9 Daily) 

Ypsi. 482-4567 


91a. Townhouses 
Rent 


for 


i 94 8. WAYNE ROAD Two 
bedroom Townhouse full 
basement private front & rear 
entrance All utilities, carpeting 4 
extras 1128 a month 729 4436 


92a. 


Banquet Halls 
for Rent 


ODDFELLOW TEMPLE 
32975 GLENWOOD 
721 9337 
722 0896 until 0P M 


95. Houses for Rent 


Save your nerves. Use our ?o yr. 
Rental Service exp. Free Ser to 
Landlords. E L Murphy 722 2222 


Cherry h-ii Inkster 2 bedroom, 
stove, refrig , air conditioning, 
laundry tac near shopping. 1175 
w.th heat 125 Areola 565 0298 or 
544 8644 


2 bdrm house, 1190 mo 1200 
security Available now 9411103 


THREE BEDROOM duplex 
Norwayne. S1S0 month. S»«0 
-cur, »y Available July 5. LO 2 


98. Mobile Home 
Space for Rent 


***** 

SUBURBAN 


104. Mobile Homes 
for Sale 


Taylor Nice 3 bedroom. 114,900 
inksler 2 bedroom 117x542 tot. 
$21 500 

CURRAN & JOHNSON CR 4 1700 


INKSTER SO DN. 

1 BEDROOMS. 2car garage 
Om v 515 500 Gl priced for this 
’Ovely well kept home with dming 
room gas heat, front porch and ail 
•n top condition Call for details 
Man, other homes also available 
Want tow payments”?'** Call 
now No 1-74 Mr Stephens. 728 
6377 weekends and eves Agent 


Complete Real Estate Service 
AT HARTFORD 

Ask for JIM JONES. 261 2000 


14' WIDE X 60' MADISON FULLY 
FURNISHED. CARPETING. 2 
BEDROOMS. MANY EXTRAS! 
SALE $5400 SET UP A. 


DELIVERED 

MICH. MOBILE HOMES 


NEAR YPSI 

10 acres. 10 Stailhorse barn w.th 
teed room & lack room Large 
corral Modern 3 bedroom home, 
garage. 145,000 


Michigans' Largest Dealer' 
1501 E Mich , Ypsi 484 1012 


Several used 12x60' Homes 
WILLOW RUN SALES 
1631 Michigan. Ypsi 48 2 4567 


OTHER FARMS 8. ACREAGE 
483-6720 
MORTON 
REAL ESTATE 


JULY CLEARANCE 
ALL PRICES SLASHED* !! 
GAROEN CITY MOBILE HOMES 
28993 Ford Rd 421 6355 


LOOK 


1972 SPECIAL S0'xl2‘ 2 Bedroom 
featuring housetype door, car 
peting, fully furnished 

$3745 

65 x12' 3 Bedroom featuring 

carpeting, house type door. 30 gal 
water heater. 8. plumbed for 
washer & dryer. 

$4745 

We handle all financing build 
oQvity, cost leis than rent NO 
APPLICATION REFUSED' To 10 
years lo pay 


B & G 


MOBILE HOME SALES 
482 6556 ,401 E Mich . Ypii 


105. Houses for Sale 


Sell (I FAST* or I'll 
BUY FOR CASH! ask for 
Ralphat HARTFORD, 261 2000 


WESTLAND 


The time to Buy .s Now 
Three bedroom ranch, I 1 , oaths, 
finished rec room home m mmt 
condition with refrigerator 
range carpeting drapes in kit 
chen. 2') caf garage, and much 
more Only 122.500 Call WEN 
DELL COMBS 

NORWOOD 522-2900 


VANDERBURG 

STARTER HOME 

Two bedroom bungalow 
in Dearborn Heights, 
completely remodeled 
inside $15,900 

DUPLEX 

In Westland, frame ex 
terior, two bedrooms 
each side. Assume the 
mortgage $19,900 

LARGE LOT 

Three bedroom home is 
completely remodeled 
inside and out, and is 
situated on a huge 80 x 130 
foot lot. $16,900 

GARDEN CITY 
SPECIAL 

Brick ranch is really 
sharp. With three 
bedrooms, carpeting, full 
basement, l'j car 
garage $27,500 

BARGAIN 

Can you imagine three 
bedrooms, carpeting, 
natural fireplace. 1»? 
baths, full basement, and 
two car garage in 
Livonia, for just $28,500. 


m 


LET S WHEEL AND 
DEAL 

5490 moves yOU in' ' 
Nothing more to pay, sellers 
aox.ous and wilt pay an other 
cos's on this brick ranch 
home three bedrooms, dming 
area I baths, carpeted 
hying room full basement. 
00x120 M corner tot in choice 
area of the suburbs fenced 
aluminum sis t a heat a 
sharo buy at 572 000 Remeber 
5490 moves you m Call and get 
fun details 


NORWAYNE 

SINGLE 


Immediate Cash for 

Houses 


LAND CONTRACT 
S90O DOWN 

3 bedrooms basement 
No waiting no delays vacant 
and you can move right into 
th.s 3 hedroom asbestoes sided 
ranch home with full 
basement carpeted liv.ng 
room, gas f a heal, aluminum 
s 4 s fenced yard, paved 
street <n fine suburban neigh 
norhood Full price a low 
519 ?00 w.lh only $900 down 
Monthly payments of $235 
mctudes taxes and insurance 
Call lor more details 


Trade In Your Present 

Home 


WINNER TAKE ALL’ 

Brick bargain $900 move in 
You are the winner with this 
one $900 s all the cash you 
need to buy this excellent 
three bedroom brick ranch 
borne on a paved street in a 
choice Westland neigh 
borhood Wail to wall car 
peiing. full basement, gas » a 
heat, aluminum s & s. car 
peted kitchen. 2* i car garage, 
fenced yard PLUS AN ABOVE 
GROUNO SWIMMING POOL 
FOR YOUR SUMMERTIME 
enjoyment Vacant w.th 
immediate possession Full 
pr-ce only 126.000 A small 
deposit starts the hall roiling 
Call for full details 


30937 Ford Garden Citv 

261-1770 


427-5400 


ESTATES 


MOBILE HOME PARK 
Country living at Its best* 
New section now open 
Lots available Garden area* 
Lawn care included 


16800 LohrRd Belleville 


697-4655 

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ 


91. Apartments 
for Rent 



Welcome to the Club! 

Elmwood Towers 
Apartments 


FOR SENIOR CITIZENS 
Relax and Enjoy the wonderful new 
Club Room ■ Cards ■ Bingo ■ Danc- 
ing ■ Billiards ■ Lounge ■ Arts & 


Crafts 

YOUR OWN i 4 A 

COMPLETE * I V I A 

APARTMENT Itll MO. 

SPACIOUS 1-BEDROOM APT. 

ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED IN RENT!!! 

■ Large Living Room with Vista 
Window ■ G.E. Refrig/freezer m Gas 
Range ■ Disposer 

■ Wall-to-Wall Shag Carpeting 

■ Individual Inter-Corn System 

964-6577 ^ 


Open Daily 10-5 Tues. thru Sun 


1325 Chene at Elmwood Park 


Royal "CUSTOM HOME BUILDING CENTERS” 



Lot Owners 

IMMEDIATE CONSTRUCTION FINANCING 


Specialized for all 3 Building Programs. Your lot and 
labor can be your down payment 


MODEL HOME OPEN 
FOR 

INSPECTION 


AN UNLIMITED SELECTION OF HOME PLANS OR 
BRING IN YOUR OWN IOEAS FOR FREE PLANNING 

ANN ARBOR-YPSILANTI WAYNE BELLEVILLE 

Hoyei Arbor Homei. Inc Poya' Paiece Momei. Inc 

S875 W. Michigan Ave 43780 Michigan A,* 

(On US 1 2. juet W of US 23L 5 miles W of Wayne Road 

Yptiland, Mich. 48197 Balievilla Mich 48111 

Pnone 434-1660 Phona 728 4220 


for freeTnformation" 

mail this coupon 


or S65 5484 



Looking for Privacy? 


MEADOW BROOK CONDOMINIUMS COULD VERY WELL 

BE YOUR ANSWER 



28 UNITS IN TOTAL AND ONLY 4 UNITS PER BUILDING. 
LOCATED AT 400 ROBBE ST in the City of Belleville 


2 bedroom unit 1104 Sq. ft plus full basement 
3bedroom unit 1248 Sq. ft plusfull basement 
Central heat and air conditioning 
No lawns to mow — No snow to shovel. 

Small town atmosphere yet minutes from Ann Arbor Metro 
Airport and detroit 


^qidre^ms Br °° k ** h “ Ve 8 nnanclng P |an 10 8ult your 


MODEL OPEN July 6 to July 13 from 2:00 p.m. ro 6';00 p.m 
Fri., Sat., Sun. til 8:00 P.M. Closed Monday 


If models are closed contact Signet Real Estate 
255 Main St. Belleville 697-8021 


Now vacant, this clean 
two bedroom home with 
gas furnace, is located at 
33014 Allenfon Court In a 
nice section near Glen 
wood and Venoy. Offered 
at no down payment to 
veterans. Just closing 
costs to assume. 


FRESH LISTING- 
$28,500 

Van Bom near Hannan 
This immaculate brick 
ranch at 39156 Van Bom 
affords delightful country 
living There are three 
bedrooms, rec room in 
basement, office off 
garage. As little as $1500 
down 

TRI LEVEL 


$32,900 

A beautiful brick at 2147 
Minerva off Glenwood. 
1700 sq. feet of living 
area, family room with 
fireplace, three 
bedrooms. 2 baths, 1500 
sq. feet of gorgeous 
carpeting, two car 
garage, large lot. About 
$1700 down No vacant. 
Call to see this one now! 

ROMULUS -$27,900 

An extra large three 
bedroom ranch with 
family room and 
fireplace. basement, 
garage about $1400 down. 


NORTHSIDE- 

$23,500 


A good chance to buy this 
home in the Glenwood 
Wayne Road area, three 
bedrooms, separate 
dining room, fireplace, 
basement. 2 car garage 
Immediate possession, 
$1300 down 


36210 WINSLOW, 


$22,900 

A nice three bedroom 
brick ranch newly 
decorated, basement, 
small swimming pool. 
Low down payment FHA 
or Gl 


ROMULUS, 4 
BEDROOM RANCH 

A fine brick home with 
natural fireplace, l 1 2 
baths, huge basement, 
screened porch. Huge 
bonus feature, central air 
conditioning immaculate 
condition. $28,500. 10 

percent down 


BRICK RANCH, 
$ 21,000 

Really outstanding buy on 
this three bedroom ranch 
with basement in Cherry 
Hill School District. Just 
closing costs down FHA 
or Gl. 


GLORIA — $18,900 

A Neat and clean two 
bedroom home with 
carpeting, gas furnace, 
aluminum siding with no 
exterior maintenance 
whatsoever. Now vacant, 
low down payments. 


BRICK RANCH 
$22,900 

A real nice home on 
Walker street in Wayne's 
south side. Three 
bedrooms, huge kitchen, 
basement rec room, large 
corner lot with large 
trees. Low down 
payment. FHA or Gl. 


WESTLAND, $32,900 


A fine all brick quality 3 
bedroom ranch on 13 
Acre, custom features 
include baseboard heet. 2 
full baths, carpeting in all 
rooms, full basement, 2’ 2 
car attached garage 10 
per cent down or will 
consider small property 
In trade. 


VENOY 


Real Estate Specialists 
32508 Michigan 
Wayne 


PA 2- 0200 


PLYMOUTH GREENFIELD 

MUST BE VETERAN 

HOOMOVESVOUIN' 

1145 monthly, large 3 bedrooms, 
basement, qarage Florida room 
Home is Beautiful' Call mark 


7EHNOER 

NORWOOD 


255-1700 


THREE BEOROOM BRICK on 
one acre Two car garage Good 
Residential district 


1800 ft ot floor space in this new 
commercial building located on 
Main SI in Belleville 


THIS IS A SPECIAL HOME ON 
BELLEVILLE LAKE - It has a 
30x50 ft swimming pool, boat 
house, three bedrooms, two baths, 
large fireplace and 190 ft of 
frontage on the lake Enjoy 
country living in this luxurious 
home 


10 ACRES on Martr Rd Zoned 


agricultural 


BELVIL REALTY 
& INVESTMENT 


130 Main St Belleville 


697-3381 


THREE BEOROOM brick, 
basement, newly decorated 
Russell. 721 0676 


HURON TWP 

27605 Clark Rd, modern three 
bedroom brick ranch built in 1970 
1* i baths, family room, garage on 
5 10, or 15 acre parce* 

27413 CLARK RO - Sharp home 
With ? room apartment in rear 
Workshop and garage on 15 acres 
MORTON TAYLOR - three 
bedroom ranch on 10 acres 
Garage barn and training ring 

RILLSTON 846-1030 



NORWAYNE 

INCOME 


WAYNE 

LOW ASSUMPTION 

This 2 bedroom is the perfect 
starter home l'> car garage 
corner lot. Fha or VA terms’ 

FRAZER 5 ’ 7 ’ 00 Ca " CUFF 

NORWOOD 522-2900 


We have for your choice 
five income properties In 
Norwayne Sub. Call and 
9*t the information and 
addresses You lust can't 
90 wrong when renters 
are paying you mortage 
payments. 


32257 PARKW00D 


MILAN-DUNDEE 

80 acres of better farm land. 2 sq 
40 s Neatly remodeled 4 bedroom 
J?.™, Barn L ,arm bwitf'OQ 
580,000 Good terms 

MORTON REAL 
ESTATE 

YPSI 

483-6720 


Three bedroom ranch, IV3 
car garage, covered patio 
and full basement large 
kitchen and dining area. 
Cyclone fenced yard. For 
more Information call 
721 4241 or 261 3434 


STARTER HOME 


DON’T BE A RENT SLAVE 
Let Us Show YOU One of the Following 


Msernenf 645 Rosevvood ' ,n ' ls, «r. 3 bedroom ranch, full 

lun*bas?men* hn ' WeS,lan<1 ' 4 bedr00m »' room, 

no 'r'thslde* 15 Chestnuf ' Wayne Older home on Waynes 

* 34 :’® ‘f 21 Hun ’- Wayne, 3 bedroom ranch with 
finished basement and pool. 

127,500 619 So Lilly Rd., Canton Twp Approx. 4 acres 
with two bedroom home. 

$27,900 815 Stanley, Ypsilanti. 3 bedroom, finished 
^_ s 0 e ^ en } t ' 2- 2 wr garage, tree lined street. 

33703 p arkwood. Westland. Newly built 3 
bedroom ranch on large lot 

Ca ' i,0 "' ia 


Special of the Week 


V.T’SLi 444 ’ Glover. Wayne. 3 bedroom ranch with 
Ve% 39e ' fam " V r °° m and ' ,niihed 

Reduced to: $24,100 1731 Regene. Westland. 3 bedroom 
finished basement, 2’ 2 car garage 
$32,500 35069 Stellwagen. Wayne. Sbedrooms, 2V, baths, 
full basement, family room. 


CALL US TODAY! 


Nita Fogarty — 729-2757 
Mary Lou Guilbault — 722 1634 
Mason Murch — 722 2604 
Chuck West — 728-2935 


GAEL ALBER —72 8 7257 
Joyce Murch — 722 2604 
Ivan Lewis — 728-1271 
Ray Long — 722-5543 


OPEN EVENINGS TILL 9.00 
SUNDAYS 1 to 4 P.M. 




STEINHAUER 

721-4845 


ROSSM A 


*•• a., i« nit •••••• 


* 


4 BEDROOMS 

Basement garaqe 70x122 lot 
SI 250 down MOVES YOU IN. 
no closing costs when you buy 
this Alummum sided home 
wfh full basement gas hi. 
targe fenced lot and garage 
ALL FOR ONLY $24 500 2 

baths, many shade frees and 
one of fhe most sought after 
areas m west suburban 
community Trades also 
accepted Now vacant Call 
tor address No C IS 


WAYNE-t-0-DOWN 

F inished basement -garage 
First time offered Easy FHA 
or Gl terms with zero down 
buys this excellent asbestos 
sided home with gas heat, 
screened In patio in rear of 
house hardwood floors and 
excellent recreation finished 
room in basement Only 
lie 900 full price Easy terms 
with closing costs only needed 
Call for address No C 59 


2LOTS-$1,200DN. 

Br<ck ranch aft garage 
Only 124 000 full price for this 
excellent 3 bedroom ail brick 
with gas hi. large 80 it wide 
'Of many trees and located in 
WESTLAND a most con 
venient area NO CLOSING 
COSTS and 11.200 is all you 
need io make deal Fast 
possession, now vacant Real 
sharp so call for defails Large 
k.fchen enclosed breezeway 
No W 64 


INKSTER-$300 

1300 moves G I in 
Alummum sided 1'* story 
home located near John Daly 
Rds south of Michigan Ave 
F.rst lime advertised Priced 
at only 116 900 and 110 starts 
deal Gas heat Call tor details 
about this and other homes 
LARGEST SELECTION IN 
INKSTER AREA, all on easy 
FHA or Gl terms Got 1300*?? 

that's all you will need No 
C 56 


5 ACRES 

8 stall horse barn 
Belleville Van Buren Twp 
near Lake and Huron River 
Or 3J0 X 675 land with sharp 
ranch and in excelleni con 
ddion I car qarage spring fed 
POND WITH BASS, above 
qround pool and the barn is in 
marvelous condition and one 
ot the best we have seen in a 
long long time Asking 137.000 
with terms or trade A dream 
location with all nice homes in 
area No C 57 


ONLY $15,500??? 

Full basement newgarage 
Hard to believe?’? But true 
This WESTLAND BEAUTY is 
priced so low that I» might 
frighten you away But if you 
have 15.900 to put down and 
fake over the 184 month total 
payments this might be the 
buy of a lifetime Family room 
w.th fireplace 2 bedrooms 
real sharp 60 x 120 fenced lot. 
gas hf . etc No red tape or 
qualifying Low 6 : « per cent 
interest also No C 90 


DEARBORN OUTER 


DR 

129 900 Brick W Outer Or 
F rsi time advertised Tall 
trees surround this 2 bath, full 
basement home located on 
•ovely W Other Dr .n wide 
street all brick area ot 
Dearborn Newly decorated 
gas hf. Vacant Fast 
possession ONLY $3,000 
DOWN on easy terms or trade 
n your present home Fenced 
solid drive, fireplace and 
more Call for address No C 
52 


$990 ASSUMES 

Garden City 94x140 lot 
3 bedroom home that is real 
clean and carpeted Gas heat 
and priced low at only 113 690 
lull price No red tape or 
qualifying Interior all dolled 
up but the exterior needs some 
work It you are a little handy 
and want to buy BELOW 
market price call for 
detaiti Must be seen to 
believe that terms as easy as 
this and priced so low really 
exists Call lor address Mo G 
10 


CARPETED KIT- 
CHEN 

Westland 3bedrm baseml 
2 CAR GARAGE and above 
ground 24' round pool ONLY 
11.150 DOWN on easy terms 
and the price Is only 122.900 for 
this brick trimmed ranch All 
rooms carpeted, wall paper 
features that delight the eye 
and convenient paneling slso 
Disposal hood and vent and 
more Coll for details Trades 
also accepted tree estimates 
No W 65 


INKSTER-$126 
MONTH 

3 bedrooms basement 
1690 takes deed to property 
This home .$ priced at only 
H5 590 and you can assume 
present mortgage and move ii 
today No waiting or red tape 
Immed-ate possession Gas 
heat shade trees Enclosed 
front porch Call for address 
John Oaty. south ol Michigan 
Ave No C 1 


LAND CONTRACT 

Garden City 11.200 down 
Vacant Immediate 
possession No closing costs or 
qualifying when you buy this 
ranch home with gas heal on 
easy land contract terms 
Lovely paved street best 
area Only 119 950 full price 
Very good condition 125 starts 
deal Call for details No C 2 t 


FREE ESTIMATES 


37017 Michigan Wayne 

PA I 1550 LO 5-8840 

Open 7 days & eves 


32017 Michigan. Wayne 

PA 1-1550 LO 5-8840 

Open 7 days & eves 


\ft Crossmam fjROSSMA 

I Q •** •• H''i4 w >• wi TxTTTi 


LOVELY tv*) bedroom 
home with l» 3 car garage 
| on nice wide tree covered 
lot. There is new car- 
peting in the living room 
and one bedroom. All 
required to move in is 
$750 and not one penny 
™ore. Located in 
Westland on Norris St. 
and the total price is only 
$14,250. This one Won't 
last long so call 721-4241 
or 261-3434 today. 


$1150 TOTAL 
MOVE-IN 

BEECHNUT in Westland 
is a three bedroom brick 
and asbestos ranch that is 
carpeted throughout, 
separate dining room full 
partly finished basement, 
V a baths on main floor, 
and an attached garage. 
For more information 
call 721-4241 or 261-3434. 



261-3434 


FINISHED 

BASEMENT 


Currier St. In Wayne 
offers this very sharp i*/j 
story aluminum sided 
bungalow for the growing 
family. The features are 
many and the price is 
right at only $21,900. 
$1,100 handles on a new 
mortgage and you can 
dose in less than three 
weeks. Call today to see 
this brand new listing that 
Won't be around long. 721- 

4241 or 261 3434. 


SHARP SHARP 


Two bedroom home on 
Bentley Court on big 
corner lot offers you 
Inexpensive living and 
CkJick occupancy. $3,000 
assumes a $127 monthly 
payment which includes 
taxes and insurance. The 
seller bought another 
home and wants offer. 
Call 721 4241 or 261 3434 to 



721-4241 


LIVONIA 


ON WEST CHICAGO — in 
between Farmington and 
Merriman This out- 
standing area of all 
quality homes offers a 
three bedroom all brick 
ranch with finished 
basement and a 1' 2 -car 
garage There is a 
beautiful patio next to a 
swimming pool with 
redwood deck. All this 
and more on a nice sized 
lot with a million trees all 
aroixid. This is a brand 
new listing and the owner 
is transferred and doesn't 
have a lot ot time. Hurry 
call 721 4241 or 261 3434. 


WE have 22 new listings 
in the last week. One may 
be what you are looking 
for. Call one of our 
courteous sales people 
and tell them your needs. 


1st STREET WAYNE] 


GI'S! ZERO DOWN! This 
much sought after area in 
Wayne offers a three 
bedroom IVj story with 
full basement and 
garage. There is dining 
room for family 
togetherness. There are 
many features that make 
this an outstanding buy at 
only $21,500 which is the 
VA appraised price. 


3 months 
to close? 


GEORGE closes new| 
mortgage sales In two 
weeks. Let us show you 
servicethat IS SERVICE. 



221< Wayne Rd. 

721-4241 




Wednesday. July 5, 1972 


A PANAX PUBLICATION- 


105. Houses for Sale 


110. Lots for Sale 


110. Lots for Sale 


113. 


Wanted: 
Real Estate 


113. Wanted: ‘ 
Real Estate 


34655 Lynn Romulus. 3 bedroom 
brick ranch, folly carpeted. lonced 
-ard. ? car garage very 
ffMCnabie By owner 941 4645 


WESTLAND 

3 bedroom ranch, large kitchen 
2' ; car garage, above ground pool, 
paved Priced to %Hi $72,900 Call 
CLIFF FRAZER 

NORWOOD 522-2900 


WAYNE -JOHN STREET 

3 bdrm broad front ranch, 
finished basement, close lo park & 
schools 

386 1691 

JOHN MOORE REALTY 


107. 


Lake & Resort 
for Sale 


JEWELL LAKE. 2 cottages on 1 
lot fireplaces, full baths. 1 bdrm .. 

T?9 3454 


105. Houses for Sale 


VAN BUREN 
SCHOOL DISTRICT 

New Homes - Big Lots 

LOT SIZE 91 x 340 


bedroom home, large 
family room. 1V 2 baths, 
extra large family kit- 
chen with custom-styled 
cabinets, many more 
features that must be 
seen to be appreciated. 
Wooded lot on paved 
road. House is extra large 
(55 x 24). and Is 
realistically priced to sell 
at $28,500 

WE WILL TRADE 

LOT SIZE 100 x 365 4 

bedroom home is now 
being built for September 
occupancy (in time for 
school). Large rooms 
throughout, IV* baths, 
maintanence-free 
aluminum siding con- 
struction, big family size 
kitchen is loaded with 
cabinets. Located on 
quiet tree-shaded street 
north of I 94, Priced at 
only $32,500 


WE WILL TRADE 
we have a few 5 acre sites 
that we will be starting 
construction of 3 bedroom 
aluminum-sided homes in 
a few weeks. If you are 
interested in a site that is 
OK FOR HORSES, don't 
wait on these. 


******** 


CITY OF WAYNE 
Attn. Veterans 


HERE'S An aluminum 
side four bedroom 
beauty that is ideal for a 
large family that Is low on 
cash, but needs a big 
home in excellent con 
dition. All newly 
decorated in and out, with 
a lot of work done to make 
it very sharp. FULL VA 
PRICE ONLY $19,000 - 
LOW CLOSING COSTS 
WILL MOVE YOU IN 
TOTAL MONTHLY 
PAYMENT OF UNDER 
$170. IMMEDIATE 
POSSESSION. . 


** ****** 



110. Lots for Sale 


10 ACRES walking distance to 
Bear and Cub Lakes Kalkaska 
County Beautifully wooded, 
borders state lores! good hunting 
area, year around county road, 
utilities $3995 00 with $800 00 down 
and $40 00 per month on 7 per cent 
land contract includes Idle m 
Surance and survey Wildwood 
Land Co halfway between 
Kalkaska and Grayling 616 258 
4871 Alter 5 30 call 616 258 4397 


113. Wanted: 
Real Estate 


Page 13 


113. 


WANTED BUILDING lots or 
small acreage parcels Call LAND 
BUYER at PA j 0259 


113. Wanted: 

Real Estate 


LOCKROWREAL ESTATE 
Broker & Accredited Appraiser 
Belleville 697 251 1 


CASH IMMEDIATELY Even II It 
is in foreclosure No points, no 
comm Agent 261 5882 


FAST CASH FOR HOMES 
NO POINTS NO COMMISSIONS 
CARLETON R E 261 1010 


DEAR HOMEOWNERS 

Are you interested in selling your 
home? We w<ll give you CASH or 
list it foe today's top dollar EVEN 
IF YOU ARE BEHINO 
PAYMENTS ANY CONDITION 
No selling commission it we buy 
MONEY WITHIN 48 HOURS For 
appraisal call 

CORBEN REALTORS 
562-3550 557-1764 


105. Houses for Sale 


BRIGMAN'S 


S: 


REAL ESTATE WORLD 

699-2022 699-2021 


HEY — IT'S SUAAMER — Look at this beautiful two 
bedroom with a full walk in basement. Over 4V* acre 
playground. Private access. 188 ft. on Belleville Lake. 


T HREE BEDROOM — lVs baths, re c room, bar, WOW 
kitchen and many other features tor only $29,000. This one 
yuu have to see. 

PSSSST — Have you .heard about the new home on 
Pasadena, it's a three bedroom tri level on a big comer 
lot Is it Ever NICE! It has an attached two car garage. 
Extra Plus -— Family room with fireplace. 


ARKONA RD. — 5 acres $6000 

OPEN DAILY 9:00 AM to 8:00 PM 

106 SOUTH ST. BELLEVILLE 

ED HELZERMAN 697-4143 Evelyn Fisher 48*0709 

WOODY BRANHAM 484-0398 PHIL BRANHAM 483 0708 




OTHERS TALK TRADE 


WE DO IT! 

697-8045 


TAYLOR 


REALTY CO. 


326-2600 
36170 FORD RD., WESTLAND 


-a DOWN 

Three bedroom aluminum ranch with l 1 ? car garage. 
60x130 treed lot. Carpeted, Westland. $19,500 
4) DOWN 

Four bedroom, breezeway and attached 2* j car garage 
new roof. 70 ft. lot. Westland. $17,900. 

4- DOWN 

If Qualify, two unit income. Live !n one side and rent 
the other Westland, $21,900. 

-0- DOWN 

Two bedroom aluminum ranch, gas forced air heat, 
ideal starter home. Closing costs approximately $500. 
Westland, $14,500. 


$1200 Assumes four bedroom ranch, one year old, 
60x140 fenced lot. Carpeted throughout. 1185 square ft., 
built-in dishwasher, 16 ft. kitchen - dining, call us now. 

$2000 DOWN On Land Contract. Tvw bedroom ranch, 
full basement. Garden City. $19,500 

$4,900 assumes this three bedroom all brick ranch with 
full basement, 20 ft. kitchen-dining Backed up to woods, 
Paved dead end street Westland. 


^ DOWN — Closing costs moves you into this sharp 
three bedroom brick ranch with large lot. Door wall 
and full basement in Westlands Bright Meadow Sub. 
Call for appointment now. 


NEW HOME $12,700on your lot —or we will find you a 
lot. lOOper cent financing. Come and see our model. 



REAL ESTATE & INVESTMENT 


LANDY W. BOX, REALTOR 


4 BEDR °OM BRICK RANCH built in 1968. Full basement, 3 baths. 
Attached garage. Quality features include marble fireplace in living room, 
fireplace in basement, plush carpeting. Formal dining room, family room On 
large lot. $54,400. 


PERFECT STARTER HOME. Cute and cozy 3 bedroom brick ranch. Fenced 
back yard with fruit trees. 1 ’/a car garage, city water. Only $19,900 
DELUXE WATERFRONT HOME. You'll continually be amazed at the features 
of ttiis 3 bedroom brick ranch. There's a large living room with fireplace, built 
ins in the kitchen loaded with cupboards, 2 baths, finished basement has U-shaped 
bar with 8 stools; f inished sunporch -garage, large lot. privacy. Mid 50's. 

NEW BOSTON AREA: 3 bedroom brick ranch with with basement, garage with 
or without 5 acres. 

CITY OF BELLEVILLE • 2 bedroom on a quiet street, very w«ll kept. Nice lot. 
Garage. 

VACANT PROPERTIES: 

NEWLISTING: 1 l-3acres with trees, gas ana water by property. $4500. 

LAKE LOT in City of Belleville. 2 car garage, steel sea wall. Land contract 
terms. $9900. 

20 OR 30 ACRES on Judd Road $1500-acre. 


697-8021 


255 MAIN ST. BELLEVILLE 


Lottie Ostrowski, Barbara Halton, Stephanie Box. Edward Uchman, Royce Smith 


list with 

VENOY REALTY 
722 0700 


NO 

LISTINGS 
WE JUST PAY 

CASH 


Wc do NOT want to list your house 
W<’ Want to BUY It and 
OUTRIGHT FOR CASH No 
commission or Fees Call Wengro 
Co at PA 2 0606 and ask for Homo 
Buyer 


105. Houses for Sale 


WE PAY more It's a proven fact, 
no waiting ADVANCE REAL 
ESTATE 477 5400 


BLESCO 

INVESTMENT 


CO. 

We are Interested in purchasing 

HOMES 

COMMERCIAL 

PROPERTY 

VACANT ACREAGE & 
LOTS 

CASH WAITING 

697 8700 


D. R. 


SCHROEDER 


REALTOR 

'SEA VICE IS OL’R BCSINESS ’ 




LOVELY VIEW of Lake from this two bedroom home 
with full basement, fireplace in living room and 
formal dining room, boatwell ready for summer 
use. 


22.900 38717 Wade Street, Romulus, REDUCED: 3 
bedroom brick ranch, 2 yrs. old. 


Three bedroom ranch with garage on 100 x 168 lot. 
Large screened In patio, lovely landscaping. 


Building site 2 acres Canton Township, possible two 
homesites. 

Lake Lot: Beautiful Private Lake Columbia, Lot high 
on hill and some trees. 


EUREKA Road Light Industrial, 5 acres all utilities, 
near National Bank of Detroit. 


Local Business Lot on Huron River Drive, near 
Rawsonville Ford Plant. 

Martz Rd., Industrial zoning, near Rawsonville Road, 
possible homesite. 

10 20 Acres on Merrlman Road, near Metro Airport, 
owner anxious, small home for interim income, priced 
lower than market value of surrounding area. 


12 Acres Huron River Drive Romulus, zoned Heavy 
Industrial, with railroad frontage income producing 
property, an orchard. May be purchased with or 
without the home. 


Belleville Road frontage approximately 600 feet, very 
near I 94 Expressway, excellent location, may be sold 
in 100 foot lots, call for deails. 


515 Main St., Belleville, 697-4611 


after 5 30 and week ends: 
Joyce Rinaldi 697 4679 
Jean Warren 697 0959 


Gerald Strong 697-8741 
Benny Farr 697 1622 
Bob Brice 697-9671 



2202 N. Wayne Rd. 


721-0676 


Real Bargain 


927 Easley Drive Westland, 3 bedroom Brick, full 
basement, built in oven & range, newly decorated FHA 
terms at $22,500 Hurry. 


Beautiful Plymouth Twp. (2440 sq. ft.) 


6 bedroom, 5 year old brick Colonial, with Family 
room, (with natural fire place) attached 2 car garage 
H 2 baths, many many other fine features, Price at only 

542,900 


Gray Brick (makes for a brighter life) 


3 bedroom ranch full basement finished, 2Vj car 
ooroge, in the city of Wayne priced to sell $24,000 owner 
transferred, immed. occupancy. 


Real Sharp Ranch 


located in Westland. 3 bedroom, with full basement 
owner has lowered his price to suit you the buyer. 
Priced at $23,900 you will agree. 


Outdoor Living 


3 acres to roam, a large completely redecorated 3 
bedroom home to live a comfortable life, and enjoy 
nature, in the heat of Canton Twp. priced at $30,900, and 
you will get more Call us for all the details. 


Beautiful "Buy" Level 


Located in Tonquish village, featuring 3 bedrooms, 
possible fourth, large kitchen and family room, 2Vj car 
garage, on nice fenced lot. Priced at $29,500 


Best Buy in Inkster 


3 bedroom all brick ranch, full basement deep lot V/a 
car garage full price $19,500 FHA terms, no down 
payment, closing costs moves you and family into 28582 
Rosewood 


Cute and Fancy 


3 bedroom all face brick, nicely carpeted, 2’/ 2 car 
garage, reel sharp, priced at $20,900, 30108 Spring 
Arbor in Inkster, You better take a look. 


ASK FOR THE BOSS 


ONLY the boss can give your family this great buy, if 
your family needs large 3 bedroom with full basement, 
gas heat large lot. located 0050 South Wayne Rd , in 
Romulus near 194, priced at $18,900, If you see the boss 
Bob Russell. 


Wanted: 
Heal F.statt 


113. Wanted. 
Real Estate 


113. Wanted: 

Real Estate 


INSTANT CASH 
NoObllgaMon Estimate 
SELL NOW MOVE LATER 
E M GREGG 816F.900 


U5TINGS WANTED 
Buyers waiting Bc«vil Really and 
Investment Co 697 3381 


TWOOFFK.es 
TOSERVE YOU 
MEMBERSMULTI LIST 

ASTRO REALTY CO 

New Boston Ollier 

941-2400 
Romulus Oil 'CP 

941-4500 


WANTED 


ALL VACANT 
LOTS 


Willing to pay cath 

Any area, any slfe 
Tor fiu-lcler 
immediate AcKoo 


Mr. 


KAYE BROKER 
355-2414 











H 


All cash paid m ?4 hours (or your home or land 
contract We buy all types of properly Get our price 
and you will gel more money 


ADVANCE REAL ESTATE 


6876 Middlebelt GA 7-5400 


Att. DONTSELL YET!! 

Until you get my c«*h offer | will 
not be outbid ' m Convinced 
wHIery have proven) Call Mark 
755 1700 Norwood. 


LIST WITH BRIGMAN 

697 707! &99 2077 


WE BUY FOR CASH 
VENOY REALTY 
PA 2 0700 


■ HAVE ONE 
MILLION DOLLARS 
I WANT HOMES 


I Will Personally 
Guarantee You Too Dollar 
For Your House 


CASH IN 24 HOURS. 


Cash now or will list /bur 
house under the guaranteed 
sales program. See 



MEL". 


ADVANCE 


Ajk For- 

MEL WHITSELL 

427-5828 


105. Houses for Sale 


SPENCER REALTY 


4417 Beech Daly 
274-2242 


BEAUTIFUL 3-BEDROOM: full basement, garage, 
completely fenced. Inkster. $22,900 conv. terms. 

OLD FOLKS BOARDING HOME — Licensed, 3 
story brick. No violations. Substantial down 
payment on land contract $40,000. 

INCOME PROPERTY — 2 family flat, located 
downtown Detroit. FHA, VA, Land Contract Call 
us' Priced for quick sale $14,500. 

FHA REPOSSESSED: Medium income families. S'O' 
Dn. Call Us! 

ATTRACTIVE 3- BEDROOM-- Features paneled 
basement with wet bar, work shop, 8i music system. 
Yard completely fenced $21,900, conv. terms. 



STINEH0UR REAL ESTATE CO 

* 697-8093 


HOMES 

ACREAGE 

COMMERCIAL 


THIS WEEKS FEATURE: 


GET OUT OF TOWN. This is your chance to enjoy the 
rural life! 4 acres with a one year old ranch that is fully 
carpeted and lovely decorating. 3 bedrms, baths, 
family room, pretty kitchen & 2 car att. garage w electric 
door opener. $35,700 asking price. 



A WARM LIVED IN FEELING is what you get when you 
see this older 2 story home. There's 3 bedrms, large kit- 
chen, basement & beautiful corner lot East of Belleville. 
$24,900 


CUTE LOVE NEST for young marrleds. This 2 bedrm 
home is all newly painted, tiled and carpeted. The frame 
exterior has also been painted so you can move In and 
adjust to the "new life" without worrying about repairs. 
Only $16,200. 


STARTING OUT OR SLOWING DOWN in either case, 
your needs are limited so this home may be fust what you 
seek* There is 3 bedrms, kit, living room & bath and is 
furnished. The best part is the location which is on 
Belleville Lake even better is the price of $19,900. Call 
today. 


THE LIVING IS EASY in this all new alum ranch that is 
ready for occupancy! Very spacious rooms Including 
family room. 3 bedrms, 1 baths, large kit & living room. 
All carpeted. Lot is 100 x 343. $32,900. 


LIMITED INCOME? Still want to buy a home? See this 
cute 2 bedrm ranch in Romulus that sets on a 120 x 120 lot 
and is furnished Garage & breezeway. $18,500 asking 
price. 


GET THE FREE FEELING from this beautiful 111 x 250 
well treed lot just West of Belleville, included is an Im- 
maculate 3 bedrm home w-family room & IV* c. att. 
garage. Asking $29,900 


A PERFECT SETTING for family life when you buy this 4 
bedrm alum home that has a family room and IV* baths. 
V 7 c gar & nice 75 x 3Q0 lot. Fast occupancy Asking 
$25,900. A GOOD BUY 


ARE YOU LEAVING the area? Gee, we hate to see you go, 
but if you need a house in the Taylor area we have a 
pleaser! 2 bedrms in this ranch home and its all newly 
decorated and ready to move into. May we show you? 
$16,900. 


IF YOU'VE THOUGHT OF BUILDING there's no need to 
as this alluring brick ranch offers 4 bedrms, IV2 baths, 
dining room, fireplace in living room and full basmt, lV*c. 
aft gar PLUS 4 76 acres. Quality built! All offers con- 
sidered - asking $57,000. 


EXTRA INCOME which means a lot when the budget 
needs stretching! Live in the comfortable 3 bedrm unit of 
this brick duplex wrtiich has fireplace in the large paneled 
living room, and let the rent from the 2 bedrm unit give you 
relief on the payments. $26,900. 


CONVENIENCE IS THE MIDDLE MAN of this property 
that is close to City of Belleville and So. Jr. High and also 
has a lovely home for your living pleasure. The 
homemaker will love the decorating in this 3 bedrm IV2 
story home that has dining room & year-round sun room 
plus l» 2 baths May we show you? $28,500. 


PICTURE FRIENDLY FESTI VITES In this large 2 story 
home on 5 acres near Belleville and you'll want to buy it to 
make those dreams come true 7 rooms, V 2 baths & full 
basement. Let us introAjce you to the convenience of this 
spacious home. $50,000. 


SPACIOUSNESS IN THE CITY of Belleville. Big 100 x 218 
fenced lot w many trees goes with this 4 bedrm frame 
ranch near Edgemont School. Other features are 2 full 
baths, family room, dining room 8i 2 car gar. Gas heat & 
Central air conditioning. Asking $32,900. 


NEED A BASEMENT & 4 bedrooms? Be sure to see this 
brick home in the Belleville School District that has all 
utilities, paved streets 8. 2 car gar. and you'll stop looking 
elsewhere! Priced at $26,500 you can't go wrong! 


PRIVACY IN A COMPACT HOUSE. Not only that - It is In 
top condition Big carpeted living room, 2 bedrms 81 cheery 
kitchen. 2 car garage. Situated on 2 acres North of 

Belleville Asking $32,900. 


GO TO THE COUNTRY to view this alum ranch w-3 
bedrms, 2' 2 c. gar 8. 70 x 200 lot in a small sub south of 
Belleville. Only $21,500. Why wait? 


A LITTLE BIT OF YESTERDAYS CHARM in this 2 Story 
home on Belleville Lake that offers gracious living. 6 
bedrms, 2 baths, spacious hall w-open stairs, dining room, 
fireplace in living room, sun porch & full basmt. Let us 

show you. Asking $65,000 


SETTING AMONG THE TREES this appealing 3 bedrm 
home offers privacy to please your family 1.22 acres 2 car 
garage Located just West of Belleville. Make an appt 
today. $33,000. 


VACATION AT HOME this summer because this brick 
ranch is on Belleville Lake and also has an inground pool 
plus lovely shade trees! Why go to a resort when you can 
have your own at home! 3 bedrms, fireplace, dining room, 
pafio & garage. $40,000. 


DO YOUR OWN THI NG when you decorate this new brick 
Stalum ranch that has 3 large bedrms, country kitchen. 1' 2 
baths 81 2 car att. gar. Carpeted thru out Move in on 
closing. $32,900. 


UNIQUE FLOOR PLAN in this year old ranch will surely 
please every member of the family. 24 x 10 living room 24 
x 12 kitchen family room, 2 large bedrms, 1 ' 2 baths & 2 car 
att oar 100 x 345 lot. This home is a charmer! $33,000. 


M. Touse 699 3231 


J. Adams 697 7109 


R Suliman 697 6151 


M. Keller 697-8679 


500 E. HURON RIVER DRIVE, BELLEVILLE 



IF YOU'RE LOOKING FOR SOMETHING A LITTLE DIFFERENT IN HOMES 


SEE KIEM 


Near Westland Center 


Asking $19,200 for this cozy 
3 bedroom home with utility 
room. Bedrooms are large. 
Kitchen includes built in 
oven and range. l'/> car 
garage too Dead end 
street. Better hurry. 


Over An Acre 


Entertain on your patio 
with double gas barbecue. 
Immediate occupancy 
available on this 3 bedroom 
Westland brick ranch with 
full basement and 2’/2 car 
garage with electric door 
opener. Terms available at 
$23,900 Call now 


Romulus 

Owner transferred and 
must sell this beautifully 
decorated 3 bedroom brick 
ranch with full basement 
and large family room with 
wood burning fireplace. 
Living room and 3 
bedrooms are carpeted 
Oiick occupancy. $26,900 


Lookin' For Country? 


Colonials 


2 Years Old 


Such a deal for a custom 
built all brick home with 
completely finished 
basement and all brick 2* 7 
car garage The tremen 
dous living room has a 
natural fireplace. Kitchen 
includes range, 
refrigerator and dish 
washer There are also 2 
warm, enclosed porches 
9x31 and 8x13. Formal 
dining room is separate. 2 
baths Call us today about 
this 2 bedroom sparkler on 
landscaped lot with lotsa 
woods Wide frontage 
Adjoining lot avale also 
$33,900 is the price of this 
Westland listing 


The 17’ 2X17’ 7 fireplaced 
family room was added to 
this "down home" 1’ 2 story 
jewel with 2 bedrooms down 
and 2 up. Carpeted 
throughout, this cutie has 
built-in oven and range 2 
car garage is attached The 
80x135 lot has trees galore. 
Additional 80x135 vacant 
lot available too Asking 
$23,500 


Check these from $25,900 to 
$28,900 3 bedroom beauties 
with large country kit 
chens, wood cabinets, 
disposal, one with range 
and refrigerator. 1' j baths, 
carpetinq. family rooms, 
Florida rooms. pool, 
garage, call today to see 


And growing Truly an 
excellent buy available 
here on a 3 bedroom brick 
ranch with partly finished 
basement and brand new 
2' j car garage with solid 
drive Big family kitchen. 
Carpeting in the living 
room, hall and 3 bedrooms. 
Don't wait. Asking $25,900 


5 Bedrooms 


Finished Basement 


Thinbark 


Exceptional 


Exterior is stone and 
aluminum on this very nice 
2 bedroom ranch with con 
venient utility room This 
home has been completely 
remodled to a "T". 1’ 2 car 
garage is aluminum sided. 
In back there is a patio and 
a 24 ft pool with deck and 
floodlights FHA and VA 
buyers call on this Nor 
wayne beauty $17,500 


3 bedrooms down and 2 up 
in this big V 2 story castle 
with 2’ 2 car attached 
garage It has a natural 
fireplace in the 22 x 15 living 
room All bedrooms are 
super large, plus there is an 
18x20 family room and a 
14x15 room which is not 
completed yet Separate 
formal dining room and sun 
porch Lot is 210 x 195 Ideal 
for the large family at 
$31,900 


Be First 


Situated on a b«g corner lot 
is this Wayne 3 bedroom 
ranch with carpeting 
throughout Roomy dining 
ell is separated by 
practical snack bar 
Dishwasher is built in I'j 
car garage has novel sun 
room attached Let us 
Show you this $22,900 
home in a fantastic neigh 
borhood 


This pretty 3 bedroom 
ranch is located in Biltmore 
Manor Sub Only 10 years 
young, this home has 
carpeting throughout in 
eluding all 3 bedrooms and 
kitchen with built in oven 
and range and air con 
ditioner If you want a 
sharp ranch, call about this 
one priced at $25,900 


Better hurry cause this 3 
bedroom brick beauty is 
centrally air conditioned, 
has a full basement, car 
oeting throughout, built-in 
oven range and dishwasher 
and spacious 2*7 car 
garage Sliding doorwall 
leads to neatly landscaped 
back yard and 20x10 
terrace Don't miss this one 
priced at $26,900 


505 N. WAYNE RD., WESTLAND 729-2500 








Fs :e B 



Check Our Everyday Low Prices 


FARM-FRESH PRODUCE 


SELF-SERVE MEATS 


COURTEOUS SERVICE 


WEEKLY SPECIALS 



GOVERNMENT INSPECTED BELTSVILLE 

TURKEYS 


Foodville is Locally Owned 


FREE PARKING 

COMPLETE LINE OF FROZEN FOODS 


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COLD BEER 


Young Tender Roasters! 


ALL BEEF 


HAMBURGER 


Ground many 
times Daily! 





RIPE 


WATERMELONS 


GRADE "A” 


LARGE EGGS 


ASSORTED 


BANQUET DINNERS 


famfM- CAMPBELL’S 

HH TOMATO SOUP 


tomM° 


CAMELOT 


SALTINE CRACKERS 


MEADOWDALE 


MARGARINE 


DAD’S 


ROOT BEER 


HOLSUM BETTER MADE 


WHITE BREAD 


LADY CAMELOT 


PAPER TOWELS 


MEADOWDALE 


SHORTENING 


FOAM 


ICE CHESTS 


5 to 9-lb. Avg. 


LB. 


39 ’ 


OPEN 24 HOURS 


M HON . THRU 10 P.M. SAT. 


524 MAIN ST., BELLEVILLE 


3-LBS. 
OR MORE 


59 ’ 


18 to 22-lbs. Avg. 


89 ’ 


I 1 1 ii 


39 ’ 


11-oz. 

Pkg. 


3 /° 


00 


m-oi. 

CAN 


11 ’ 


16-OZ. 

BOX 


17 ’ 


* 


l-LB. 

SOLID PRINT 


15 


12-OZ. 

CAN 


7 ’ 




20-OZ. 

LOAVES 


’1 




2 


ROLL 

PKG. 


19 ’ 







99 ’ 


SUPER 

MARKETS 




Prices effective thru July 11. 1972 We reterve the ri^ht to limit quwititiei. NO SALE TO DEALERS. 







*•